2016-2018 Undergraduate and Graduate Bulletin (with addenda) 
    
    Jan 28, 2020  
2016-2018 Undergraduate and Graduate Bulletin (with addenda) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


A Brief Guide to Course Descriptions

Each program described in this catalog contains detailed descriptions of the courses offered within the program.

The first line gives the official course number for which students must register and the official course title. The letters indicate the discipline of the course and the first number of the official course numbers indicates the level of the course. The levels are as follows:

  • 1XXX - Freshman Level
  • 2XXX - Sophomore Level
  • 3XXX - Junior Level
  • 4XXX - Senior Level
  • 5XXX to 9XXX - Graduate level

Typically the last number of the course number indicates the number of credits. The breakdown of periods of the course is also listed.

When selecting a course for registration, the section of the course may include the following notations:

  • “LEC” - lecture section
  • “RCT” or “RC” - recitation section
  • “LAB” or “LB” - lab section

Additionally, any other letter or digit listed in the section will further identify the section and being liked to another section of the class with the same letter and/or digit combination. Further information on sections is available from academic advisers during registration periods.

The paragraph description briefly indicates the contents and coverage of the course. A detailed course syllabus may be available by request from the office of the offering department.

“Prerequisites” are courses (or their equivalents) that must be completed before registering for the described course. “Co-requisites” are courses taken concurrently with the described course.

The notation “Also listed…” indicates that the course is also given under the number shown. This means that two or more departments or programs sponsor the described course and that students may register under either number, usually the one representing the student’s major program. Classes are jointly delivered.

 

Electrical Engineering (Graduate)

  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6233 System Optimization Method

    3 Credits
    Formulations of system optimization problems. Elements of functional analysis applied to system optimization. Local and global system optimization with and without constraints. Variational methods, calculus of variations, and linear, nonlinear and dynamic programming iterative methods. Examples and applications. Newton and Lagrange multiplier algorithms, convergence analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and ECE-GY 5253  or ECE-GY 6253  or equivalent.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6243 System Theory and Feedback Control

    3 Credits
    Design of single-input-output and multivariable systems in frequency domain. Stability of interconnected systems from component transfer functions. Parameterization of stabilizing controllers. Introduction to optimization(Wiener-Hopf design).

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and ECE-UY 3064 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6253 Linear Systems

    3 Credits
    Basic system concepts. Equations describing continuous and discrete-time linear systems. Time domain analysis, state variables, transition matrix and impulsive response. Transform methods. Time-variable systems. Controllability, observability and stability. SISO pole placement, observer design. Sampled data systems.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and ECE-UY 3054  or ECE-GY 5253 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6263 Game Theory

    3 Credits
    The goal of this class is to provide a broad and rigorous introduction to game-theoretic methods and algorithms for complex systems. The material spans disciplines as diverse as engineering (including control theory and signal processing), computer science (including artificial intelligence, algorithms and distributed systems), micro-economic theory, operations research, public policies, psychology and belief systems. A primary focus of the course is on the application of cooperative and non-cooperative game theory for both static and dynamic models, with deterministic as well as stochastic descriptions.  The coverage will encompass both theoretical and algorithmic developments, with multi-disciplinary applications.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Status
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6303 Probability and Stochastic Processes

    3 Credits
    Continuous and discrete random variables and their joint probability distribution and density functions; Functions of one random variable and their distributions;  Independent random variables and conditional distributions;  One function of one and two random variables; Two functions of two random  variables and their joint density functions; Jointly distributed discrete random variables and their functions; Characteristic functions and higher order moments; Covariance, correlation, orthogonality;  Jointly Gaussian random variables; Linear functions of Gaussian random variables and their joint density functions. Stochastic processes and the concept of Stationarity; Strict sense stationary (SSS) and wide sense stationary (WSS) processes; Auto correlation function and its properties; Poisson processes and Wiener processes;  Stochastic inputs to linear time-invariant (LTI)  systems and their input-output autocorrelations;   Input-output power spectrum for linear systems with stochastic inputs; Minimum mean square error estimation (MMSE) and orthogonality principle; Auto regressive moving average (ARMA) processes and their power spectra.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status
    Also listed under: BE-GY 6453 .
    Note: Online version available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6333 Detection and Estimation Theory

    3 Credits
    Binary hypothesis testing and Bayes’ criteria; Receiver operating characteristics; Composite hypothesis testing. Parameter estimation theory - Random parameter estimation; Minimum mean square error (MMSE) estimation; Maximum a-posteriori (MAP) estimation; Nonrandom parameter estimation; Minimum variance unbiased estimators; Cramer-Rao bound and Rao-Blackwell theorem; Multiple parameter estimation and Fisher information matrix. Series representation of stochastic processes; Karhunen Loeve (K-L) expansion of a stochastic process over a finite time. Stationary stochastic processes; Autocorrelation function and power spectrum; Spectrum extension problem from finite autocorrelations; Maximum entropy solution and auto regressive processes. Direction of arrival (DoA) estimation using multiple sensors; Detection of distinct signals in white noise and colored noise.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE-GY 6303 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6363 Data Center and Cloud Computing

    3 Credits
    Data center and cloud computing are key technologies in building large-scale Internet services. Many service providers rely on data center and cloud computing platforms to provide applications, storage, computation, etc. This course covers the fundamental knowledge of data center and cloud computing and offers hands-on experience. Topics to be discussed include data center and cloud platform architecture, data center network designs, software-defined networks, data center security, traffic engineering, resource management, green data centers, and multi-access edge computing. The course provides a series of labs for students to learn various tools used in data centers and cloud computing.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE-GY 5373  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6383 High-Speed Networks

    3 Credits
    This course covers the basics, architectures, protocols and technologies for high-speed networks. Topics: synchronous optical network (SONET), asynchronous transfer mode (ATM), ATM adaptation layer (AAL), 10/100/1000/10G Ethernet, Ethernet over SONET (EOS), quality of service control, packet scheduling, network processor, buffer management, flow and congestion control, TCP, high-speed TCP and XCP, Routing and IP fast rerouting, WDM networks, MPLS and GMPLS. Each student is required to complete a project that can be reading, software design or hardware design.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE-UY 3613  or ECE-GY 5373  or equivalent.
    Note: Online version available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6403 Fundamentals of Analog Integrated Circuit Design

    3 Credits
    The course will begin by providing a device-oriented overview of integrated circuits and silicon fabrication processes and their ramifications on the transistor models. Subsequently, we will discuss various amplifier topologies in ICs using these devices, and also examine in detail topics such as frequency response, linearity, biasing, feedback, operational amplifiers, compensation, and noise. The blocks and circuit architectures discussed in this course are the core components of most integrated systems and essential in applications such as communications, multimedia, imaging, sensors, and biomedical.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing or ECE-UY 3124   and GPA of at least 3.0 (for Undergraduate students)
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6443 VLSI System and Architecture Design

    3 Credits
    This course continues from ECE-GY 6473  and covers top-down VLSI design using VHDL including structural design, modeling, algorithmic and register level design, synthesis, prototyping and implementation using FPGAs and methods to design for test (DFT). This course provides a solid background and hands-on experiences with the CMOS VLSI design process in which custom design techniques (covered in ECE-GY 6473 ) are married with HDL synthesis to produce complex systems. Students complete a project covering design partitioning, placement and routing, automated synthesis and standard cell design and use. The course explores how these techniques are used in designing ASICs, System-on-Chips (SoC) and advanced microprocessors.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE-GY 6473 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6453 Advances in Reconfigurable Systems

    3 Credits
    Reconfigurable hardware platforms are in widespread use for telecommunications, video processing, cryptography, control and biomedical applications. The course will provide a detailed understanding of the real world reconfigurable hardware design methodologies using Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGA). A complete system will be implemented from specification to physical implementation on a FPGA. In the process, the course will discuss (1) designing a complex digital system using a hardware description language; (2) implementing, testing and validating the design on a reconfigurable hardware platform; and (3) providing all relevant design information to be able to integrate the reconfigurable hardware platform in any higher level system.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE-GY 6463  
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6463 Advanced Hardware Design

    3 Credits
    This course shows how a hardware-description language (for example, VHDL) can be used for computer hardware modeling, logic synthesis, register-level synthesis and simulation. The resulting design with hundreds or thousands of gates is then ready to be downloaded to form FPGA chips or silicon cells. Programs used: QuickVHDL, modeling and simulation tools from Mentor Graphics or similar large-scale programs. A design project is required and students make a written and oral presentation.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6473 Introduction to VLSI System Design

    3 Credits
    This course covers CMOS processing technology, MOS transistor theory, static/dynamic circuit and logic design techniques, circuit performance estimation, standard cells and gate arrays, clocking strategies, input/output structures, data path, memory and control logic design. Advanced VLSI CAD tools are used for schematic capture, layout, timing analysis and simulations for functionality and performance.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status
    Note: Online version available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6483 Real Time Embedded Systems

    3 Credits
    This course provides an overview of the unique concepts and techniques needed to design and implement computer systems having realtime response requirements in an embedded environment. It contrasts the concepts and techniques of real time and embedded systems with those of more traditional computer systems. Topics include: Basic concepts of real time and embedded systems, hardware features, programming languages, real time operating systems, synchronization techniques, performance optimization and current trends in real time and embedded systems such as incorporating internet connectivity.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6493 Design and Test of Digital Systems

    3 Credits
    Logic simulation methods, structural hazards; Manufacturing test fundamentals, fault modeling and simulation, automatic test pattern generation algorithms; Enhancing testability of digital systems: Design for testability; Advanced testing techniques: Test data compaction and compression techniques; Integrated circuits vs System-on-A-Chip (SOC) design styles and their manufacturing test implications.

  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6513 Fundamentals of Solid-State Electronic Devices

    3 Credits
    Introduction to semiconductor materials, energy band structures, and carrier transport; p-n junctions and Schottky barriers; heterostructures; bipolar and field-effect transistors; and introduction/survey of some electronic/optoelectronic devices that utilizes above device concepts.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing or Undergraduate Standing with 3.0 GPA or higher and completion of MA-UY 2034  and PH-UY 2023  .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6523 Nanoelectronic Devices

    3 Credits
    Introduction to quantum mechanics (Schroedinger’s equation); energy-band diagrams in semiconductors, quantum effects in MOS transistors; analytical description of ultra-thin body (UTB) MOSFETs, FinFETs and tunnel FETs; introduction to mesoscopic transport; MIT virtual source model; novel channel materials for transistors (InGaAs, graphene, carbon nanotubes), alternate state variable devices (design in sub-nanometer nodes, spintronics).

    Prerequisite(s): ECE-GY 6513   or has taken an undergraduate course in solid state devices. Undergraduate students must have a 3.0 cumulative GPA or higher.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6553 Quantum Mechanics I

    3 Credits
    Quantum mechanics with applications to atomic systems. The use of Schrodinger’s equations. Angular momentum and spin. Semi-classical theory of field-matter interaction.

    Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 2122  and PH-UY 3234  or equivalents.
    Also listed under: PH-GY 6673 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6583 Fiber Optic Communications

    3 Credits
    This course deals with the operating principles of optical communications systems and fiber-optic communication technology. The main elements of systems are presented in block diagrams and discussed individually. The advantages and disadvantages and the applications of Fiber Optic Communications Systems are discussed. Topics include: overview of optical communication systems, review of optics, review of analog and digital communications, the characteristics of optical fibers, optical waveguides, optical sources and transmitters, optical detectors and receivers, optical amplifiers, noise and detection, impairment in optical communication systems and optical network design issues. Upon completion of this course, students are familiar with the principles and technology of optical communication systems, and are able to design a simple point-to-point optical communications link, including bandwidth, loss, signal to noise ratio (S/N) and bit error rate considerations.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status or ECE-UY 3604 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6603 Power Electronics

    3 Credits
    The course centers on principles of thyristor devices, GTOs, MOSFETs, IGBTs; dynamic characteristics of DC/DC converters; forced commutation circuits; switched-mode power supplies; full- wave and half-wave rectifiers; phase controlled converters; effect of the load characteristics; pulse-width modulated inverters.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and ECE-UY 3824  or equivalent.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6613 Electrical Transmission & Distribution Systems

    3 Credits
    Introduction to T&D systems. Choice of voltage and frequency. Radial and meshed networks. Aerial lines: construction, parameters and thermal rating. Cables: installations, impedance and thermal ring. Transformers and reactors: types, connections and parallel operation. Capacitors: construction and application to transmission, distribution and industrial systems. Grounding systems. Characteristics of loads: customer classes, voltage sensitivity, duty cycle, and load growth. Loss minimization by system reconfiguration and capacitor switching. Modern grids: nano-, micro-, mini-, smart-, and super-grid.

    Prerequisite(s):   and   
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6623 Smart Grids: Control, Economics, Planning and Regulation

    3 Credits
    This course teaches multi-disciplinary fundamentals of power engineering, economics, optimization, and policy analysis that constitute modern power system economics and planning. These fundamentals make it possible to understand and study the concept of smart grids as a particular case of large-scale, network-constrained infrastructure that can be simulated by using various optimization techniques. The course also provides knowledge to pursue advanced work on transmission- and distribution-level smart grid technologies, e.g. renewable generation, demand response, energy storage.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and ECE-GY 5613  or equivalent.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6633 Transients, Surges and Faults in Power Systems

    3 Credits
    Analysis of lumped-circuit, normal and abnormal transients in power equipment and systems. Short-circuit fault analysis and transient recovery of three-phase circuits. Analysis of traveling-wave surges on transmission lines, windings and integrated systems.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and ECE-GY 5613  or equivalent.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6653 Power System Stability

    3 Credits
    The course introduces power-system dynamics: mathematical modeling of prime movers, power plants, synchronous machines, field exciters transmission lines, relay loads and stabilizers.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status, ECE-UY 3824  and ECE-GY 5613 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6663 Distributed Generation Systems

    3 Credits
    Benefits and limitations and classification of small generating systems; principles of operation and electrical equivalent circuits of fuel cells, solar cells, micro-turbines, reciprocating engines, wind turbines and gas turbines; fault conditions; reactive power support; power quality issues.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE-UY 3824  and ECE-GY 5613  or equivalent.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6673 Resonant Power Converters

    3 Credits
    Class D and E rectifiers.  Class D inverters.  Class E inverters.  Phase-controlled resonant inverters.  Class DE inverters.  Resonant dc-dc converters. Soft switching.  Quasiresonant and multiresonant converters.  Control and modeling of resonant converters.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE-UY 3824  or an approved equivalent
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6683 Electric Drives

    3 Credits
    Reduction of load performance characteristics to the motor shaft. Electromechanical energy conversion. Acceleration and deceleration time. Construction of load diagram. Choice of motor type and size for different duty cycles. Four quadrant operation. Basics  of Direct-Current and Induction motor drives. Permanent magnet and synchronous drives. Electrical braking. Conventional and modern speed control of DC and AC drives. Also included are many worked examples taken from practical electric drive systems.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and ECE-UY 3824  or equivalent.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6693 Electronic Power Supplies

    3 Credits
    This course covers following topics: Review of power relationships. Power semiconductor switching devices. Rectifiers. Basic PWM dc-dc switching cells. Non-isolated and isolated PWM dc-dc converters. Control of PWM converters. Resonant and softswitching converters. Low drop-out (LDO) voltage regulators. Switched capacitor charge pumps. PWM inverters. Applications to computer equipment, portable units, distributed power systems, uninterruptible power supplies and electric drives. Power quality and EMI issues. American and International power-supply standards.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE-UY 3824  or equivalent.
    Note: Online version available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6713 Electromagnetic Theory and Applications

    3 Credits
    This course introduces Maxwell’s equations, wave equation, vector potentials, boundary conditions and Poynting vector. Time-harmonic fields and phasor approach are introduced. The properties of freely propagating plane waves in uniform and layered media are derived, as well as waves guided by structures, including various transmission lines, hollow waveguides and dielectric waveguides. A unified treatment of wave propagation is given with general theorems and examples drawn from microwaves, integrated circuits and optics.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and ECE-UY 3604 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6723 Electromagnetic Radiation and Antennas

    3 Credits
    The electromagnetic fields radiated by current elements are derived from Maxwell’s equations. From these results, the fields radiated by many types of antennas are derived, including various types of dipoles, arrays, aperture, and frequency independent and traveling wave antennas. Concepts introduced include radiation resistance and pattern, directivity, gain, effective area, reciprocity, bandwidth, noise temperature, mutual coupling and array scanning impedance.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and ECE-GY 6713 , or   with grade B or better.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6813 Medical Imaging

    3 Credits
    This course introduces the physics, instrumentation and signal processing methods used in X-ray imaging (projection radiography), X-ray computed tomography, nuclear medicine (SPECT/PET), ultrasound imaging, magnetic resonance imaging and optical imaging. Co-listed with BE-GY 6203.

    Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate level courses in multivariable calculus (MA-UY 2112  & MA-UY 2122  or MA-UY 2114  ), physics (PH-UY 2033  ), probability (MA-UY 3012  ), signals and systems (ECE-UY 3054  ).  Students who do not have prior courses in signals ans systems must take ECE-GY 6113  / BE-GY 6403  - Digital Signal Processing I as a prerequisite or must obtain instructor’s approval; ECE-GY 6123  - Image and Video Processing is also recommended but not required.
    Also listed under: BE-GY 6203 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 6913 Computing Systems Architecture

    3 Credits
    This course provides students with an understanding of computer systems architectures and fundamental computer- performance and capacity-improvement techniques. An assembly language and an instruction set are presented and a uniprocessor computer is built to implement the instruction set. Processor implementation with a data path and hardwired and microprogrammed control is introduced, and pipelining is described as a strategy to improve throughput. Memory-hierarchy alternatives are introduced to improve the capacity of the computing system. The concept of virtual memory and its hardware implementation is introduced. Out-of-order processors, and associated instruction scheduling algorithms and techniques are described and evaluated. Branch prediction is introduced. The main memory system is described and pre-fetching is discussed as a technique to improve main memory access latency. The course concludes with an introduction to single chip multi-core computing technology. Hands-on programming exercises to illustrate the concepts are inter-woven throughout the course.

    Prerequisite(s): Undergraduate degree in EE/CE/CS
    Note: Cannot earn credits for both CS-GY 6133 and EL-GY 6913.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 7133 Digital Signal Processing II

    3 Credits
    Filter design via optimization. Spectral factorization. Minimum-phase FIR filter design. Multirate systems. Interpolation. Short-time Fourier transform (STFT). Filter banks. Wavelet transforms (in one and two dimensions). Lattice filters for filter banks. Sparse signal processing (optimization algorithms and applications). Signal/image models (mixture models, non-Gaussian, etc.). Inverse problems (de-blurring, missing data estimation). Matlab programming exercises.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE-GY 6113  or equivalent.
    Note: Online version available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 7143 Advanced Machine Learning

    3 Credits
    This course presents the main concepts, techniques, algorithms, and state-of-the-art approaches in modern machine learning from both theoretical and practical perspective. Students will be exposed to new mathematical proof techniques and up-to-date machine learning coding environments and benchmark datasets. The program of the course includes empirical risk minimization, support vector machines, kernels, optimization techniques for machine learning, clustering, principal component analysis, Expectation-Maximization, online learning algorithms, boosting, decision trees, graphical models, and deep learning. The course contains tutorials on selected most popular machine learning software environments. The course finally emphasizes interesting and important open problems in the field. Mathematical maturity (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mathematical_maturity) is required from students registering for the course.

    Prerequisite(s): CS-GY 6923 Machine Learning  with minimum grade B+ or ECE-GY 6143 Machine Learning  with minimum grade B+ and ECE-GY 6303 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 7253 State Space Design for Linear Control Systems

    3 Credits
    Topics covered in this course include canonical forms; control system design objectives; feedback system design by MIMO pole placement; MIMO linear observers; the separation principle; linear quadratic optimum control; random processes; Kalman filters as optimum observers; the separation theorem; LQG; Sampled-data systems; microprocessor-based digital control; robust control and the servocompensator problem.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and ECE-GY 6253 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 7353 Network Modeling and Analysis

    3 Credits
    The course introduces the analytical techniques used in the design and performance analysis of networks. Building on their knowledge of networking technology and applied mathematics, especially probability, students learn basic queuing theory, to be applied to performance analysis of multiplexers, switches and multiple access networks. Newer techniques such as the network calculus, the study of non-Poissonian long range dependent traffic sources and applications to TCP, admission control, advanced packet switches and IEEE 802.11 networks are introduced.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE-UY 3613   or ECE-GY 5373  (or equivalent) and ECE-GY 6303  (acceptable as a co-requisite)
    Note: Online version available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 7363 Network Design and Algorithms

    3 Credits
    The course covers network design, which consists of topology design and traffic routing taking into account dynamics in network states, such as link/node failures and traffic demand variations. Efficient design models and optimization methods are crucial to simultaneously achieve good network user performance and high savings in network deployment and maintenance. This course introduces mathematical models, design problems and optimization algorithms that can be used to guide network design practice. Subjects include: Network Design Problem Modeling, Optimization Methods, Multi- Commodity Flow Routing, Location and Topological Design, Fair Networks, Resilient Network Design, Robust Network Design, Multi-Layer Networks.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE-UY 3613   or ECE-GY 5373  or equivalent.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 7373 High Performance Switches and Routers

    3 Credits
    This course addresses the basics, the theory, architectures and technologies to implement high-performance high-speed large-scale routers and switches. The fundamental concepts and technologies of packet forwarding, classification and switching learned in the class are useful and practical when designing IP routers, Ethernet switches and optical switches. Topics: IP Route Lookup, Packet Classification, Packet Scheduling, Buffer Management, Basics of Packet Switching, Output-buffered Switches, Shared-memory Switches, Crosspointbuffered Switches, Input-buffered Switches, Clos-network Switches, Multi-Stage Buffered Switches, Two-Stage Load-Balanced Switches, Optical Packet Switches and ASIC for IP Routers.

    Prerequisite(s): ECE-UY 3613   or ECE-GY 5373  or equivalent.
    Note: Online version available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 8223 Applied Nonlinear Control

    3 Credits
    Stability and stabilization for nonlinear systems; Lyapunov stability and functions, input-output stability and control Lyapunov functions. Differential geometric approaches for analysis and control of nonlinear systems: controllability, observability, feedback linearization, normal form, inverse dynamics, stabilization, tracking and disturbance attenuation. Analytical approaches: recursive back stepping, input-to-state stability, nonlinear small-gain methods and passivity. Output feedback designs. Various application examples for nonlinear systems including robotic and communication systems.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and ECE-GY 6253  or ECE-GY 7253 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 8233 Optimal Control Theory

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on optimal control problem for deterministic systems with various constraints. Topics: solution for both continuous and discrete-time systems using the maximum principle and dynamic programming. Singular arcs. Neighboringoptimal solutions. Fuel and time optimal control problems. Computational methods.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status, ECE-GY 6233  and ECE-GY 6253 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 8253 Large-Scale Systems and Decentralized Control

    3 Credits
    This course introduces analysis and synthesis of large-scale systems. Topics: systemorder reduction algorithms, interconnected system stability, series expansion and singular perturbation. Lyapunov designs. Applications to traffic networks, power systems and transportation networks. Decentralized control: decentralized fixed-mode, LQR, frequency-shaped cost functional and overlapping decompositions. Stability of interconnected systems and Vector Lyapunov analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and ECE-GY 7253  or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 9473 Sel Tpcs in Computer Electronic Devices & Systems


    Special topics of current interest to staff in the field of electronic devices, circuits and systems. (See departmental mailing for detailed description of each particular offering.) Prerequisite: Specified when offered.

  
  •  

    ECE-GY 9900 Seminar in Electrical and Computer Engineering

    0 Credits
    This course consists of seminar presentations on recent developments in electrical and computer engineering by speakers from industry, research and education institutions. to receive a satisfactory grade, a student must attend at least two thirds of the seminars during the semester registered. A PhD student must register and obtain satisfactory grade for at least four semesters.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 0 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 9933 Readings in Electrical and Computer Engineering I

    3 Credits
    This course requires a student to read advanced literature in a research field relevant to electrical and computer engineering, under guidance of a faculty member who is expert in the field. Oral presentation and a written report is required. Not more than 3 credits may be taken toward the master’s degree. A student must secure a project adviser before registration.

    Prerequisite(s): Degree status.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 9941 Advanced Projects III

    1.5 Credits
    Theoretical and/or experimental projects in various research areas in electrical and computer engineering. Projects assigned on basis of specialized interest and preparation of the student and conducted under guidance of a faculty member who is expert in the chosen subject. Oral presentation and/or a written report is required at the discretion of the adviser.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate degree status
    | Weekly Lab Hours: 4.5
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 9943 Readings in Electrical and Computer Engineering II

    3 Credits
    This course requires a student to read advanced literature in a research field relevant to electrical and computer engineering, under guidance of a faculty member who is expert in the field. Oral presentation and a written report are required. No more than 3 credits may be taken toward the master’s degree. A student must secure a project adviser before registration.

    Prerequisite(s): Degree status.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 9953 Advanced Projects I

    3 Credits
    This course requires a student to conduct a theoretical and/or experimental project in a research area in electrical and computer engineering. The project is chosen based on the student’s specialized interest and preparation and is guided by a faculty member who is expert in the chosen subject. Oral presentation or a written report is required at the adviser’s discretion. A student must secure a project adviser before registration.

    Prerequisite(s): Degree status.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 9963 Advanced Projects II

    3 Credits
    This course requires a student to conduct a theoretical and/or experimental project in a research area in electrical and computer engineering. The project is chosen based on the student’s specialized interest and preparation and is guided by a faculty member who is expert in the chosen subject. Oral presentation or a written report is required at the adviser’s discretion. A student must secure a project adviser before registration.

    Prerequisite(s): Degree status.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ECE-GY 9980 Electrical Engineering Area Exam



English

  
  •  

    EN-UY 2114/W Poetry as Structure and Design

    4 Credits
    Following and challenging William Carlos Williams’ definition of a poem as “a machine made of words,” this course examines how poems are made. The course explores questions of invention and innovation in poetic form and how “form” and “content” interact in a wide range of poetry - from the earliest English ballads to contemporary work.

    Prerequisite(s): EXPOS-UA 1
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4
  
  •  

    EN-UY 2124/W The Short Story

    4 Credits
    This course fulfills the requirements for a writing-intensive course. It is an introduction to the themes, structures, and techniques of the short story. Objectives: to introduce the short story as a literary form; promote research and critical reading and thinking skills; to promote written and oral communication skills; and to enhance cultural, social, and aesthetic understanding through intensive reading of and writing about short fictional texts written by American authors and by authors from other countries.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements.
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    EN-UY 2134/W The Novella: Between the Short Story and the Novel

    4 Credits
    This course introduces the origins, characteristics and innovative qualities of the novella from several countries and historical periods. The course compares this genre with the novel and short story. Students discuss and write about assigned works.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    EN-UY 2174W The World’s Greatest Journeys

    4 Credits
    In this introduction to the literature of the journey, from several countries and historical periods, the focus is on the place of science, innovation and invention in these works. This writing-intensive course emphasizes revision.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    EN-UY 2194/W The Rise of the Graphic Novel

    4 Credits
    This course explores the recent emergence of the graphic narrative as a literary genre. How has the comic book, once exclusively identified with popular culture, developed into a mode for sophisticated literary and artistic creation?

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    EN-UY 2204/W Science Journalism

    4 Credits
    Introduction to a field of specialized writing that includes science and technology articles geared to an informed lay audience and published in newspapers, business magazines, niche publications, and online journals and blogs. Students will read and comment on classic pieces written since the field began to take shape as a major sector of the media following World War II. Students will research and write news and feature articles on science, technology, and medical issues, with the clear purpose of publishing their work in the school newspaper. Emphasis will be on research, development of interviewing skills, accuracy and clarity in reporting, and writing style. Each student will also compose a major “think” piece that explores and interprets a complex, controversial public-policy issue besetting one of the science/technology disciplines today.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    EN-UY 2244 Shakespeare and the Creative Imagination

    4 Credits
    In this course, students learn how Shakespeare’s writings were influenced by his literary forebears and how he has inspired artists since his own time. Through this approach, the course explores the author’s particular creative genius and his legacy.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    EN-UY 2254/W Literature and War

    4 Credits
    This course explores how literary depictions of war have changed over time. We begin with early examples such as Virgil’s “Aeneid,” “Beowulf,” and Shakespeare’s “Henry” plays, in which war is closely identified with heroism and coming of age and move onto later examples such as Vonnegut’s “Slaughterhouse-Five” and O’Brien’s “The Things They Carried,” in which participating in war is portrayed as a more troubling activity. In addition to literature, we will address theoretical readings on the impact of new technology on the language of war.

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    EN-UY 2324/W Technologies of Literary Production

    4 Credits
    This course examines how the changing status and technologies of written language have shaped and continue to transform literary culture. Beginning with works first conceived and transmitted as part of rich oral traditions, the course will end with works of literature produced primarily for online readers.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    EN-UY 2334/W Literary Inventiveness

    4 Credits
    This course explores not the subject of “innovation” in literature, but the fact of it. Students read a range of literary texts that invented utterly new ways of writing: new forms and new approaches to consciousness and language itself. The course focuses on two clusters of literary and linguistic innovation: (1) writing in the ancient world, where narrative, drama and lyric-and indeed, the technology of writing itself-were first invented, and (2) works by pioneering literary modernists who radically reinvented the forms forged by their earliest predecessors.

    Prerequisite(s): EXPOS-UA 1
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4
  
  •  

    EN-UY 2354/W Inventing America: Nation, Culture, Self

    4 Credits
    This course explores the ways American writers have imagined-and participated in- the invention of nation, culture and self, from the Colonial period through the Civil Rights era. Special attention is paid to how American writers have engaged with questions surrounding the “newness” of American culture and how literature has reflected and affected “change” in American culture.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    EN-UY 2414/W The City and Literature

    4 Credits
    This course examines the role of a major international city in works of poetry, drama, and fiction.  By way of contrast, we will take a brief look at what happens in works set outside of a city.  Attention will be paid to historical context. 

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: This course satisfies HUSS elective requirements and HUSS writing intensive requirements.

  
  •  

    EN-UY 2424 Medicine and Literature

    4 Credits
    This course examines the implications of medicine, mental or physical illness, and death in works of poetry, drama and fiction.  Some attention will be paid to historical context.  This course satisfies HUSS elective requirements.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    EN-UY 2424W Medicine and Literature

    4 Credits
    This course examines the implications of medicine, mental or physical illness, and death in works of poetry, drama and fiction.  Some attention will be paid to historical context.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: This course satisfies HUSS elective requirements and HUSS writing-intensive requirements

  
  •  

    EN-UY 3000W English Special Topics

    4 Credits
    An advanced course in English literature, open to all students, including those pursuing the cross-school English minor.

    Prerequisite(s): EXPOS-UA 2 
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4
  
  •  

    EN-UY 3104 Science Fiction Workshop

    4 Credits
    A workshop in writing Science Fiction, with extensive reading in the genre. | Prerequisites: Completion of first year writing requirements.  Notes: Satisfies a HuSS elective.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    EN-UY 3144/W Analytical Approaches to Poetry and Art

    4 Credits
    The poems of John Ashbery and the art of Richard Serra confront the respective reader/viewer: find a methodology based upon the structural configuration of the poem and sculpture to enable a “reading” of the work. The works that will be addressed reject impressionistic, subjective commentary. The beauty of word or artifact is not applicable. Post-1900 non-referential sculptures and paintings will be juxtaposed with poems that disassociate themselves from narrative content, poems whose only subject matter is language configuration - even when there is apparent thematic material - poems of Robert Creeley, John Ashbery, Emily Dickinson, Robert Frost, Wallace Stevens, Amy Clampitt, Susan Howe, Michael Palmer, Clark Coolidge, and Louis Zukofsky. The poets so listed complement preoccupations of artists such as Mark di Suvero, David Smith, Richard Serra, Anthony Caro, Donald Judd, Carl Andre, Vito Acconci, Robert Smithson, and Marcel Duchamp.
     

    Prerequisite(s): EXPOS-UA 1 and EXPOS-UA 2
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4
  
  •  

    EN-UY 3154 Fantasy Workshop

    4 Credits
    A workshop in writing fantasy, with extensive reading in the genre.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    EN-UY 3164W Special Topics in English Literature

    4 Credits
    An advanced course in English literature, open to all students, including those pursuing the cross-school English minor.

    Prerequisite(s): EXPOS-UA 2  
    Note: Satisfies a HuSS elective.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4
  
  •  

    EN-UY 3194 Ethical Questions in Literature

    4 Credits
    This course examines the implications of ethical questions posed in works of poetry, drama, and fiction.  Attention will be paid to historical context.  This course satisfies HUSS elective requirements.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    EN-UY 3194W Ethical Questions in Literature

    4 Credits
    This course examines the implications of ethical questions posed in works of poetry, drama, and fiction.  Attention will be paid to historical context.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements.
    Note: This course satisfies HUSS elective requirements and 3000-level writing intensive requirements for all Poly majors.

  
  •  

    EN-UY 3434W Machines Made of Words II: Designing Poetry

    4 Credits
    In this seminar/workshop, students read a wide range of poetic forms or structures and practice making poems, focusing on the reading and composition of poems as forms of design.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements and EN-UY 2114/W  or permission of instructor.
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    EN-UY 3814/W The Environment and Literature

    4 Credits
    Nature as an inspiration for writers is not new. Concern for the environment, both indoors and out-of-doors, is not new. Recently, however, the critical discipline of ecocriticism has emerged as a way to study the relation between the environment and poetry, drama, fiction, and non-fiction drawn from the traditional literary canon. This course will study some of those works and the many implications of this relationship. Works of art may supplement the readings.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements.
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    EXPOS-UA 1 Writing the Essay

    4 Credits


    This is the foundational writing course. It provides instruction and practice in critical reading, creative thinking, and clear writing. It provides additional instruction in analyzing and interpreting written texts, the use of written texts as evidence, the development of ideas, and the writing of both exploratory and argumentative essays. The course stresses exploration, inquiry, reflection, analysis, revision, and collaborative learning.

    Previously referred to as EW 1013.

  
  •  

    EXPOS-UA 2 The Advanced College Essay

    4 Credits


    This course follows EXPOS-UA 1  and provides advanced instruction in analyzing and interpreting written texts from a variety of academic disciplines, using written texts as evidence, developing ideas, and writing argumentative essays. It stresses analysis, argument, reflection, revision, and collaborative learning.

    Previously referred to as EW 1023.

    Prerequisite(s): EXPOS-UA 1 .

  
  •  

    EXPOS-UA 4 International Workshop Writing 1

    4 Credits
    Previously designated by section number under EW 1013.

  
  •  

    EXPOS-UA 9 International Workshop Writing 2

    4 Credits
    Previously designated by section number under EW 1023.


Finance

Undergraduates in Graduate FRE Courses

The Department of Finance and Risk Engineering does not permit undergraduates to take courses with the prefix “FRE”; these are graduate courses reserved for graduate students. Exceptions are made only for sub-matriculated undergraduates; undergraduates who have applied to and been accepted to the MS FE program at NYU-Poly in their Senior year of undergraduate studies. No other exceptions are made.

  
  •  

    FIN-UY 2003 Economic Foundations of Finance

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on the fundamental economic concepts underpinning modern financial theory. Material includes consumer behavior; utility theory; analysis of production and costs; competitive markets; monopolistic and monopsonistic markets; time value of money; game theoretic analysis of oligopoly; asymmetric information in markets; externalities; market efficiency and more. The calculus is used to develop these concepts.

    Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 1124  or MA-UY 1154   or MA-UY 1424   and Sophomore Standing or higher.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    FIN-UY 2103 Creating and Understanding Financial Statements

    3 Credits
    This course provides a solid understanding of the creation and interpretation of modern financial statements. Topics include the compelling reasons for financial statements, Sarbanes- Oxley, U.S. accounting principles and how they differ abroad, quality of financial information, financial ratios and their uses, cash-flow analysis, measurement of corporate performance, credit analysis and introduction to managing financial risk.

    Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 1124  or MA-UY 1154   or MA-UY 1424   and Sophomore Standing or higher.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    FIN-UY 2203 Corporate Finance and Financial Markets

    3 Credits
    This course covers the fundamentals of corporate finance, valuation, risk, capital budgeting and market efficiency. Students who complete this class acquire a solid foundation needed for intermediate and advanced topics in finance. This class is a prerequisite for all FIN classes at the 3000 level.

    Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 2054  or MA-UY 2212  (or MA-UY 2224  ) or MA-UY 3012 , 8 credits of calculus, and Sophomore Standing or higher. 
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    FIN-UY 3213 Financial Management and Risk Engineering

    3 Credits
    The course introduces the elements and techniques of risk engineering spanning the following: Probabilities and their distributions and data analysis and statistics as well as Monte Carlo simulation. Throughout, these techniques are demonstrated through special problems and cases providing the necessary tools and concepts for dealing with major problems in risk engineering, decision-making under uncertainty, and financial management and pricing. The course is based on multiple sessions in a Financial Laboratory environment, using computational- risk software, statistical and financial econometric software, and simulation programs and software.

    Prerequisite(s): FIN-UY 2203 . Corequisite(s): FIN-UY 2003  and FIN-UY 2103 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    FIN-UY 3233 Derivatives and the Options Market

    3 Credits
    This course builds on mathematical models of bond and stock prices and covers two major areas of mathematical finance with significant impact on operating-model financial markets, namely, Black-Scholes arbitrage pricing of options, and other derivative securities and interest rates together with their term structure. The course makes significant use of probability and calculus, covering the material in a mathematically rigorous and complete manner.

    Prerequisite(s): FIN-UY 2203 . Corequisite(s): FIN-UY 2003  and FIN-UY 2103 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    FIN-UY 3403 Entrepreneurship and Financial Management

    3 Credits
    This course introduces the finance of entrepreneurship and venture capital. It considers the perspectives of the start-up firm and the venture capitalist and develops a framework for understanding the laws, contracts and issues involved in reaching mutually profitable contracts.

    Prerequisite(s): FIN-UY 2203 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    FIN-UY 3503 Operational Risk Modeling and Analytics

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on how to optimize business strategies, qualitatively and quantitatively with respect to operational risk. The course is organized around the principle that operational risk analysis consists, in part, of data collection and the building of mathematical models to describe the risk of failures in human resources, processes and technology. Beginning with a foundation for operational risk modeling and a focus on the modeling process, the course discusses probabilistic tools for operational risk modeling and statistical methods to calibrate models of operational risk. The quantitative assessment of operational risk uses the tools of probability, statistics and actuarial science.

    Prerequisite(s): FIN-UY 2203 . Corequisite(s): FIN-UY 2003  and FIN-UY 2103 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    FIN-UY 4903 Special Topics in Finance and Risk Engineering

    3 Credits
    The course considers unique topics of interest in Finance and Risk Engineering. It may feature a detailed look at a single topic or a series of focused topical presentations.

    Prerequisite(s):   ,   and  

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    RSK-UY 3593 Probabilistic Risk Assessment

    3 Credits
    This undergraduate course in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) introduces students to a deep, comprehensive methodology for risk evaluation associated with complex engineered technological designs. Four fundamental questions are addressed: what can go wrong, what are the indications of potential failure, what is the potential magnitude of the failure, and with what probability will failure occur. We will also explore human reliability analysis and common-cause-failure analysis. This course can be applied towards the requirements for NYU-Poly’s minor in Nuclear Science and Engineering but not towards the minor in Finance.

    Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 2054  or MA-UY 2212  or MA-UY 3012 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0

Finance and Risk Engineering

Undergraduates in Graduate FRE Courses

The Department of Finance and Risk Engineering does not permit undergraduates to take courses with the prefix “FRE”; these are graduate courses reserved for graduate students. Exceptions are made only for sub-matriculated undergraduates; undergraduates who have applied to and been accepted to the MS FE program at NYU-Poly in their Senior year of undergraduate studies. No other exceptions are made.

  
  •  

    FRE-GY 5010 FRE Bootcamp I

    0 Credits
    This summer bootcamp online experience for the incoming MS Financial Engineering cohort prepares students for coursework in Financial Engineering and for summer internship interviews.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to MS Financial Engineering
    Note: No fees or tuition for admitted, deposited incoming students.

  
  •  

    FRE-GY 5020 FRE Bootcamp II

    0 Credits
    This summer bootcamp online experience for the incoming MS Financial Engineering cohort prepares students for coursework in Financial Engineering and for summer internship interviews.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to MS Financial Engineering
    Note: No fees or tuition for admitted, deposited incoming students.

  
  •  

    FRE-GY 5030 FRE Bootcamp III - From Brain Teasers to Black-Scholes

    0 Credits
    This summer bootcamp experience for the incoming MS Financial Engineering cohort prepares students for coursework in Financial Engineering and for summer internship interviews.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to MS Financial Engineering Corequisite(s): FRE-GY 5040 
    Note: No fees or tuition for admitted, deposited incoming students.

  
  •  

    FRE-GY 5040 FRE Bootcamp IV - Risk, Applied Statistics, and Probability

    0 Credits
    This summer bootcamp experience for the incoming MS Financial Engineering cohort prepares students for coursework in Financial Engineering and for summer internship interviews.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to MS Financial Engineering Corequisite(s): FRE-GY 5030 
    Note: No fees or tuition for admitted, deposited incoming students.

  
  •  

    FRE-GY 5500 Bloomberg Certification

    0 Credits
    This course tracks the requirement for the self-paced, self-taught Bloomberg certification to be completed through a Bloomberg terminal.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Financial Risk Engineering students only.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 0 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    FRE-GY 5990 Capstone Assessment

    0 Credits
    The Master of Science in Financial Engineering program offers four types of Capstone experiences to its graduate students: theses, projects, special topics, and internships. This Capstone Assessment will serve as a centralized measure for the various types of Capstone experiences to identify whether students have successfully completed this experience and garner feedback about graduating students’ skills and professional readiness. Note: course should be completed during final semester of studies.

    Prerequisite(s): FRE-GY 9973  or FRE-GY 7023  or FRE-GY 7043  or two special topics courses of 1.5 credits each, with a capstone paper submitted to the faculty.
  
  •  

    FRE-GY 6003 Financial Accounting

    3 Credits
    This course provides a solid foundation in the construction and interpretation of financial statements. Topics include accounting terminology; financial statement preparation and analysis; liquidity and credit risk ratios; depreciation calculations; revenue recognition; and accrued liabilities and asset valuation. Also covered are the effects of equity transactions; cash flows; and various accounting methods on financial statements.

    Prerequisite(s): Matriculation into a graduate program sponsored by the Department of Finance & Risk Engineering, or permission of the Department.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    FRE-GY 6021 Financial Insurance and Credit Derivatives

    1.5 Credits
    Financial insurance and Derivatives have moved to the center of modern corporate finance, investments and the management of financial institutions. Option pricing concepts are applied to price complex structured financial products and to price portfolios of equity-linked life insurance. This course also introduces modeling and the pricing of credit derivatives such as CDOs and the many other vehicles used to securitize portfolios of MBS, Loans, etc. Applications to Fixed Income problems, interest rates and bond derivatives, the management of portfolio risks and their like are considered.

    Prerequisite(s): FRE-GY 6103  and matriculation into a graduate program sponsored by the Department of Finance & Risk Engineering, or permission of the Department.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    FRE-GY 6023 Financial Economics

    3 Credits
    This course provides a rigorous introduction to the principles and application of the theory of financial economics. Following a review of foundational theories of markets and competition, this course covers the following areas: certainty and perfect capital markets, the institutional setting of financial economics, risk and contingent claims theory, and capital market imperfections and the limits to arbitrage that these impose on financial systems.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    FRE-GY 6031 Money, Banking and Financial Markets

    1.5 Credits
    Studies how the interactions among money, the financial system and the economy determine interest rates and asset returns. It utilizes a consistent approach based in economics to explain the role of the financial system in matching savers and borrowers and in providing risk-sharing, liquidity and information services in efficient financial markets. Students study why and how financial markets and financial instruments evolve as a function of transactions and information costs, adverse selection and moral hazard problems, and summarize economic arguments for and against regulation. Finally, they examine the money supply process and monetary policy, in particular the link between monetary authorities and the macro-economy through a transmission mechanism involving banks and the non-financial public.

    Prerequisite(s): Matriculation into a graduate program sponsored by the Department of Finance & Risk Engineering, or permission of the Department.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    FRE-GY 6041 Extreme Risk Analytics

    1.5 Credits
    The course covers failures of financial theory in risk management, deriving from fundamental definitions and assumptions in modeling, including pricing formulae; convexity; stochasticity and volatility; “fat tails”; and risk. Other topics: Portfolio robustness and extreme markets and moral hazard; datamining biases and decision error; and decision- making with incomplete information.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    FRE-GY 6051 Insurance Finance and Actuarial Science

    1.5 Credits
    This course highlights essential facets of actuarial science, insurance and the finance-insurance convergence. The course assumes that students are familiar with basic notions of expected utility and stochastic processes, and options pricing. Topics include Insurance Business and Insurance Firms Management; Principles of Actuarial Science and Risk Pricing in Insurance and in Finance (Complete Markets); Expected Utility Approach to Insurance Risk Pricing and Management; Derivatives and the Financial Approach to Insurance Pricing; Insurance Products (Life Insurance, Casualty, Pension Funds and Defined Benefits); Principles of Insurance Management in a Dynamic and Global Setting. Throughout, the course uses numerous cases centered on actuarial and insurance problems and analyzes them from a financial perspective. Of particular interest are those related to insurance pricing, reserve policies, insurance pension funds, CATBOND and weather (insurance) derivatives and regulation.

    Prerequisite(s):   
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    FRE-GY 6071 Derivatives, Financial Markets and Technology

    1.5 Credits
    This course covers basic derivatives, including futures contracts, forward contracts, option contracts and swap contracts. The principal focus is on the use of these instruments by financial institutions. Basic valuation concepts are discussed, as are the use of derivatives for speculation, hedging and arbitrage. The specifics of the contracts and the markets in which they trade are also discussed. The main focus gives students in the Financial Technology track a general understanding of the derivatives market and risk management.

    Prerequisite(s): FRE-GY 6003 , FRE-GY 6023  and FRE-GY 6103  and matriculation into a graduate program sponsored by the Department of Finance & Risk Engineering, or permission of the Department.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    FRE-GY 6073 Introduction to Derivative Securities

    3 Credits
    This course explains in detail various models and methods for pricing and hedging derivatives including: European, American, exotic options, swaps, and convertible bonds. Presentation is done using equity, interest rate, and volatility derivative products. A short introduction to computational methods necessary for pricing derivatives is provided.

    Prerequisite(s): Matriculation into MS Financial Engineering or permission of the department.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    FRE-GY 6083 Quantitative Methods in Finance

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on quantitative methods and financial modeling. Probability theory, stochastic processes and optimization are studied and applied to a broad variety of financial problems and their derivatives. Topics include probability spaces; conditional probability; densities; distributions; density estimators; multivariate probability; moment generating functions; random walks; Markov processes; Poisson processes; and the Brownian-motion process.

    Prerequisite(s): Students are expected to know calculus and elementary probability, and Graduate Standing.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
 

Page: 1 <- 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 -> 15