2016-2018 Undergraduate and Graduate Bulletin (with addenda) 
    
    Jul 21, 2019  
2016-2018 Undergraduate and Graduate Bulletin (with addenda) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


A Brief Guide to Course Descriptions

Each program described in this catalog contains detailed descriptions of the courses offered within the program.

The first line gives the official course number for which students must register and the official course title. The letters indicate the discipline of the course and the first number of the official course numbers indicates the level of the course. The levels are as follows:

  • 1XXX - Freshman Level
  • 2XXX - Sophomore Level
  • 3XXX - Junior Level
  • 4XXX - Senior Level
  • 5XXX to 9XXX - Graduate level

Typically the last number of the course number indicates the number of credits. The breakdown of periods of the course is also listed.

When selecting a course for registration, the section of the course may include the following notations:

  • “LEC” - lecture section
  • “RCT” or “RC” - recitation section
  • “LAB” or “LB” - lab section

Additionally, any other letter or digit listed in the section will further identify the section and being liked to another section of the class with the same letter and/or digit combination. Further information on sections is available from academic advisers during registration periods.

The paragraph description briefly indicates the contents and coverage of the course. A detailed course syllabus may be available by request from the office of the offering department.

“Prerequisites” are courses (or their equivalents) that must be completed before registering for the described course. “Co-requisites” are courses taken concurrently with the described course.

The notation “Also listed…” indicates that the course is also given under the number shown. This means that two or more departments or programs sponsor the described course and that students may register under either number, usually the one representing the student’s major program. Classes are jointly delivered.

 

Technology Management and Innovation

  
  •  

    MG-GY 7703 Entrepreneurship

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on entrepreneurship and venture creation as key engines for wealth creation and successful business strategy in the modern, innovation-intensive, high-tech economy. The course deals with key issues such as: (1) assessing attractiveness of opportunities; (2) launching a new venture; (3) nurturing, growing and entrepreneurial venture; (4) obtaining the necessary financial, human and technology resources; (5) managing the transition from a small entrepreneurial firm to a large, sustainable, professionally managed but still entrepreneurial corporation; and (6) being an entrepreneur and promoting entrepreneurship in a large corporation.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7733 Services Innovation

    3 Credits
    This course deals with services innovation. Services have eclipsed manufacturing and dominate a modern, advanced economy. According to some estimates, services account for close to 80 percent of U.S. employment. This course examines how value creation occurs in a range of fast-growing services sectors, including retailing, hospitality, financial services, professional services, travel, logistics and healthcare. The course emphasizes that services are diverse, and distinguishes explicitly between traditional and high-value services. This course focuses especially on high-value services. A key objective of this course is introducing best practices for nurturing modern services innovation.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7743 Advanced Trends in Technology Management and Innovation

    3 Credits
    This course explores several emerging trends in the technology management and innovation arena in the past decade. These trends include the advent of digital-based innovation in the late 1990s, which has affected profoundly how many firms conduct business; the effect of the crash of the NASDAQ in March 2000 and the September 11 attack that affected corporations, which then had to operate within major economic and creative constraints; the development of the concept of networks as it relates to a firm’s organization and strategy; the development of the wireless technology platform and its effect on technology innovation; and the development of a new innovation paradigm that suggests a relationship between information technology, creativity and business practices. The course emphasizes classroom discussions and team-based and individual projects.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7811 Selected Topics in Networking and Information Technologies

    1.5 Credits
    This course explores in-depth selected modern networking and information technologies. Specific topics vary year to year. Examples are mobile communications, IP telephony, enterprise data systems. The course builds on previous TIM courses. Students receive a solid technology grounding in a learning context that also emphasizes how these selected technologies affect markets, industries, providers, integrators and users. The course’s technical content is supplemented by case examples and guest speakers.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7841 Negotiation in Technology Intensive Sectors

    1.5 Credits
    Negotiation is the art and science of creating good agreements. This course covers the science of negotiation by discussing and applying theories of negotiation. The art of negotiation is learned by practice. Students develop the art by negotiating with each other in realistic cases. A wide variety of negotiation applications is covered, including one-time and repeated negotiation, single and multi-issue negotiations, and two-party and multiparty bargaining. The class emphasizes negotiations in technology-intensive environments. This class is taught using the case method. Many examples are cases that students negotiate with each other. Students’ grades are based on their performance in these negotiations and on class participation.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7851 Leadership

    1.5 Credits
    Leaders set a vision, communicate it well and influence and inspire others to achieve their vision. However, leaders face many challenges in effectively meeting these objectives and can be aided or handicapped by effective and ineffective methods. This course develops the student’s leadership approach by analyzing individual styles, understanding their impact and then enabling each student to create the right leadership style. This course addresses fundamental leadership issues and frameworks, drawing on current organizational research, but most of all it provides students with ways of getting insights on their own leadership style. The course emphasizes hands-on experience and focuses on experiential learning. Course objectives include assessing leadership styles; developing leadership skills; and understanding the role of leadership coaching in managing teams.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7861 High-technology Entrepreneurship

    1.5 Credits
    This course focuses on entrepreneurship as a critical engine for wealth creation in the high-technology, innovation-intensive economy. It covers such key issues as: (1) assessing attractiveness of opportunities; (2) launching a new venture; (3) obtaining the necessary financial, human and technology resources; (4) managing the transition from a small entrepreneurial firm to a large, sustainable professionally managed but still entrepreneurial corporation; and (5) being an entrepreneur and promoting entrepreneurship in a large corporation.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7871 Intellectual Property for Technology and Information Managers

    1.5 Credits
    This course focuses on the role of intellectual property (e.g., patents, trade secrets, copyrights and trademarks) as a major element in modern technology and information strategy. Relevant concepts and case studies are used, with examples representing classical and digital innovations.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7873 Managing Intellectual Property and Intellectual Capital

    3 Credits
    Intellectual property and intellectual capital constitute major strategic and financial assets of a modern business and can be employed to protect existing products, services and business methods and to accelerate development of new products, services and business methods. Firms can leverage intellectual property and intellectual capital to enhance their competitiveness, value and profitability. This approach is true in the physical world and in the online world of the Internet and e-business (where traditional principles of Intellectual Property Rights are often stretched and may need reinterpretation and even modification). Intellectual property is becoming increasingly complex as emerging digital technologies advance. This course is a broad and full survey of the main areas and issues associated with managing intellectual property and intellectual capital. The course concludes by examining how firms can best manage their intellectual capital.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7881 Modern Supply Chain Management: Integration Through Technology

    1.5 Credits
    This course introduces the role of information technology in supply-chain management. Both qualitative and quantitative aspects of supply chain management are covered. Students discuss and analyze articles pertaining to leading-edge research and management thought. The underlying objective is to prepare participants to develop useful skills for analyzing technology, marketing, logistics, operations and broader channel management issues. Classes use the case method. A high level of class interaction is expected.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7883 Information Security and Privacy: Systems

    3 Credits
    This course centers on management issues in information security and privacy in systems planning and development. Students learn to take a risk-based approach to integrating security into the planning and development of information systems at organization and enterprise levels. Topics covered: Risk analysis and management; integrating security into system design processes; security policies; legal, ethical, and privacy issues; and security in the software design process.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7891 Special Elective Topics for EMOT and EIM

    1.5 Credits
    This course covers selected key emerging trends and issues in the MOT and IM domains. The course involves discussion with industry leaders and specialists from business, government and academia. The course includes topical treatment of technologies, markets, business practices, government regulations and the relationships among them.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7953 Global Innovation

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on global technology-enabled innovation. Topics covered include accessing global sources of innovation, coordination and organization of activities worldwide, new product development globally, the role of revitalized global R&D, growing prominence of IT and e-Business in global innovation and the role of alliances and linkages with customers, suppliers and other third parties.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7963 Modern Financial Institutions and Their Competitive Environment

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on managing modern financial enterprises, innovation and technology management in these organizations, and the risk-return tradeoff from a financial institution perspective. It deals with the theory and practice of financial institutions by analyzing the regulatory, technological and competitive factors that define the dynamics of this rapidly changing industry. Knowledge in this course is developed primarily with a mix of textbook reading and discussions of concepts in real business contexts through case studies. The objective is to provide technology managers with a firm knowledge of the normative consequences on financial-management decision making to create shareholder value.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7971 Financing for Value Creation

    1.5 Credits
    This course focuses on creating strategies and financial skills required by managers of entrepreneurial and innovative firms at various stages of evolution: from new, stand-alone entrepreneurial ventures to innovative, technology driven projects of established corporations.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7983 Managing Technological Innovation and Emerging Technologies in Financial Services

    3 Credits
    This course, for current and future managers, introduces emerging information technologies and their applications in financial services industries. It covers three major financial services industries: banking, investment and insurance. Students develop a deeper understanding of concepts and analyze real-business context through case studies. The course provides adequate technical knowledge and discusses related managerial issues in depth.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8203 Project Management

    3 Credits
    This course examines the management of technology-based projects, ranging from individual research and development to large scale and complex technological systems. Topics: Feasibility and risk analyses. Project selection and portfolio optimization. Functional and administrative structures, coordination and scheduling of activities, personnel planning, negotiations and contracts, cost estimation, capital budgeting, cost controls, effective matrix management.

    Also listed under:  

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8213 Information Security and Privacy for Managers

    3 Credits
    This course addresses the principles of information security and privacy from a risk management perspective. Students learn why security is important to the enterprise and the potential impacts of security and privacy failures. Attacks will be discussed in terms of the goals of the attackers, their capabilities and the concept and high-level technical aspects of the attack’s operation. Each of the leading security controls is discussed in terms of the kinds of attacks it is meant to thwart, the concept of the defensive operations of both technologies and related processes, and management issues concerning the control.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8253 Project Management for Construction

    3 Credits
    The course covers topics specific to developing and coordinating large projects, including organizational structures, management functions, pricing and estimating project costs, bidding and contracting, risk allocation, scheduling, time and cost control, labor relations, quality management and project life-cycle activities.

    Also listed under:  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8263 Construction Cost Estimating

    3 Credits
    This course covers estimating and cost control from the viewpoint of contractors and construction engineers; details of estimating with emphasis on labor, materials, equipment and overhead.

    Also listed under:  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8273 Contracts and Specifications

    3 Credits
    This course covers principles of contract law as applied to the construction industry and legal problems in preparing and administering construction contracts.

    Also listed under:  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8333 Information Security and Privacy: Operations

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on management issues related to information security and privacy in operations. Students design security programs and processes that foster strong lifecycle security. Topics addressed include security organization structure, security program models, economics of security, security management of operations, incident response, contingency planning, compliance, security considerations of outsourcing and global operations, and security audits.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8573 Managing Cleantech and Renewable Energy Innovation

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on the rise of cleantech/ renewable energy (aka sustainability green, etc.) as a possible major locus of Twenty- First-Century innovation. The course deals with the diverse ways innovation is taking pace in the broadly defined cleantech arena. The course covers technology management in several distinct cleantech/renewable technology regimes and varied company venues (e.g. small, medium size and large firms). The encompasses local and global modes of cleantech/renewable energy innovation. The course requires single-firm, multi-firm and “systems” perspectives for understanding with cleantech/renewable energy innovation. The course employs both intellectual and practitioner- oriented orientations. Throughout, this course maintains a primarily managerial perspective. Students are often asked to assume the role of managers charged with the responsibility of designing, supporting and implementing a cleantech/renewable energy innovation strategy. An overarching concern is on discovering ways to improve the effectiveness of cleantech/renewable energy innovation and technology management and, where appropriate, entrepreneurship.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8603 Financial Planning and Control

    3 Credits
    This course examines the latest and most relevant approaches for modern financial planning and control. Specific examples of best practices are studied. Topics covered include an overview of financial planning and control, operational-level financial planning and control, management reporting, forecasting, the application of technology and analytics, the relationship between strategic planning and operational-level financial planning and control, the challenges of implementation and emerging trends in the financial planning and control area. The course emphasizes trade-offs and balance, e.g., a need for financial planning and control and a desire to also have employee empowerment in modern firms.

    Prerequisite(s): MG-GY 6093 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8633 Market Research

    3 Credits
    This course deals with the role of market research in modern firms and with the ways market research can help to make business decisions. The focus is on how market data and information is gathered, analyzed and used. Topics include experimental and questionnaire design, use of various analytical tools, interpretation of findings and development and execution of plans based on market research results. The strengths and drawbacks of various techniques are examined.

    Prerequisite(s): MG-GY 6073 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8643 New Product Development

    3 Credits
    The dynamics of technology and the pressures of competition drive enterprises to make their product development and production processes strategically more effective and economically more efficient in time and cost. The course deals with the state of the art in new product activities for services and manufacturing firms and examines in-depth the marketing, technology and manufacturing technology linkages.

    Also listed under: MN-GY 8643 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8653 Managing Technological Change and Innovation

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on how to employ a dual perspective to manage technological change and innovation effectively. One perspective is based on individual, group and organizational theory, research and practice. This body of literature, viewpoints and experience provide essential guides to manage successfully the introduction of new technologies. Realizing the full potential of new technologies requires effectively managing change to assure the commitment of all stakeholders. The second perspective is based on innovation theory, research and practice. This body of literature, viewpoints and experience provide key insights to manage effectively the process of innovation and its impact on an enterprise. The course explicitly considers a firm’s need to manage and inspire people so they can communicate and innovate effectively.

    Also listed under: MN-GY 8653 .

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8663 Technology Policy

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on the macro-environment that influences and is relevant to technology decision making, strategy and innovation in firms, government agencies, non-profit institutions and other organizations. Primary concerns include introducing effective approaches to analyze and evaluate societal-wide factors that influence innovation; to assess various attempts and policies to stimulate innovation in a city, region, nation or globally; to explore the role of technology and innovation in diverse managerial, economic and social contexts (e.g., advanced economies, rapidly emerging economies and Third World economies); to examine the relationship between business-government and NGOs in promoting and sustaining innovation; to explore the impact of global rivalry and global cooperation in the technology and innovation arena; and to understand the place of technology and innovation in the post-Cold War era and in the early 21st century.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8673 Technology Strategy

    3 Credits
    This course examines indepth the strategic technological decisions that a general manager faces. From entrepreneurial start-ups to established companies, in dynamic as well as mature environments, a firm must create a conscious process of formulating and implementing a technology strategy to serve its business interests. Such a strategy guides investments in research and development, selection among and timing of alternate technologies, organization and communications, formation of alliances and funding of ventures.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8693 Special Topics

    3 Credits
    This course requires Individualized readings on special topics assigned by instructor.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8703 Introduction to Modern Information Technology Strategy

    3 Credits
    This course deals with applied competitive strategy. Students completing this course master a basic understanding of the competitive implications of information technology and the strategies for using information technology in business. This competence in analysis is arrived at through understanding how availability of information (through technology or otherwise) affects the basic strategic options available, and how firms and industries are likely to be affected. In addition, students are introduced to the process of evaluating potential systems innovations. They then are able to participate in strategic and systems planning from a managerial point of view.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8711 Introduction to Entrepreneurial Finance

    1.5 Credits
    This course is briefly introduces the financial requirements of entrepreneurial ventures and different sources of finance available to entrepreneurs. The course presents fundamentals for assessing various entrepreneurial financial strategies. The program will consider offering this course only at the request of other departments.

    Note: This course is not open to MSM and continuing MBA students.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8713 Entrepreneurial Finance

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on the financial requirements of entrepreneurial ventures and on different sources of finance available to entrepreneurs. The course develops an understanding on how to assess various entrepreneurial financial strategies. The course also examines the unique roles in the entrepreneurial finance arena of such factors as retail banks, investment banks, VCs, angels, internal sources of capital, and incubators.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8721 Introduction to Managing Growing Enterprises

    1.5 Credits
    This introductory course deals with a critical challenge that potentially confronts all successful entrepreneurial small- or medium-size firms: how to sustain and accelerate major growth. At some point in the life of all growing enterprises, a firm usually must change. This course introduces several ways a growing firm can transform itself from a small to a larger enterprise. The course explores how such companies can maintain the benefits of an entrepreneurial commitment and spirit while
    obtaining needed skills associated with professionally managed larger firms. The program will consider offering this course only at the request of other departments.

    Note: This course is not open to MSM and continuing MBA students.

  
  •  

    MG-GY 8723 Managing Growing Enterprises

    3 Credits
    This course deals with a critical challenge that potentially confronts all successful entrepreneurial small or medium-size firms: how to sustain and accelerate major growth. At some point in the life of all growing enterprises, a firm usually must change. The firm no longer can operate on a scale that is small, possibly ad hoc and overly responsive. to adapt, the firm needs to exploit successfully its success in the marketplace and the future attractiveness of its innovative products and services. This course examines how a growing firm can transform itself from a smaller to a larger enterprise. The course focuses particularly on how companies can maintain the benefits of an entrepreneurial commitment and spirit while still obtaining needed skills associated with professionally managed larger firms. In this way, fast-growing firms can take advantage of innovation-based opportunities while scaling up.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8731 Introduction to Corporate Entrepreneurship

    1.5 Credits
    Large firms require professional management. to innovate, however, large corporations often must also practice entrepreneurship. This course briefly introduces how large corporations nurture and sustain entrepreneurship.

    Note: Not open to MSM, MSOB and continuing MBA students. The program will consider offering this course only at the request of other departments.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8733 Corporate Entrepreneurship

    3 Credits
    Large firms require professional management. to innovate, however, large corporations often must also practice entrepreneurship. This course focuses on how large corporations nurture and sustain entrepreneurship and on how entrepreneurship is an integral part of a successful large firm’s strategy and structure today. This course examines forms of internal entrepreneurship, corporate venture capital, and the obtaining of entrepreneurial capabilities via acquisition.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8741 Introduction to Entrepreneurial Marketing and Sales

    1.5 Credits
    This course introduces entrepreneurial marketing and sales and covers various topics about entrepreneurial marketing and sales. The program will consider offering this course only at the request of other departments.

    Note: This course is not open to MSM and continuing MBA students.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8743 Entrepreneurial Marketing and Sales

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on critical marketing and sales challenges facing entrepreneurial firms. The course examines an underlying theme of entrepreneurship: that successful innovative enterprises must deeply understand relevant markets and must effectively cultivate and reach those markets. Topics include market identification, segmentation, sales, overall market planning, niche and viral marketing, and customers as sources of innovative ideas.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8753 Information Technology: Systems

    3 Credits
    This course prepares the student to be an educated consumer of information technology systems, thereby maximizing the strategic advantage of IT to an organization. Information technologies, architectures and products are categorized and analyzed with a view to develop and maintain the most favorable IT asset portfolio to carry out successfully business goals and strategies. Students learn techniques for making group decisions in assessing technology, outsourcing decisions, bidding on projects and negotiating contracts. Students also learn to manage a reliable, high-quality portfolio of information-technology systems, based on new insights into the relationship between the technology and business needs.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8763 Information Technology: Operations

    3 Credits
    This course covers IT operations and services. Students learn to deliver reliable, high-quality IT services through an automated, optimized IT infrastructure and operation, based on new insights into the relationship between those services and business needs. Topics covered: IT governance, data center automation, infrastructure optimization, service management, application performance management, and security management.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8763 Knowledge Management

    3 Credits
    Knowledge workers, employed primarily in professional and technical occupations, are increasingly becoming an important segment of the U.S. labor force. The success of innovative organizations today often results from the knowledge and skills applied by their professional and technical employees. Effective management of such a work force has become one of the most critical problems faced by organizations in the private and public sectors. Reflecting this problem, the course addresses issues relating to creating, sharing and applying knowledge in organizations. The course examines knowledge management from various perspectives, focusing primarily on the organizational, managerial and technological perspectives.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 8783 Managing Cloud Computing

    3 Credits
    Many corporations and governments around the world are either planning or are in the process of migrating into a “Cloud”. Cloud computing as a technology is proliferating at a rapid pace, and as such, there are myriad definitions, architectures, and models that are being developed. Cloud is a significant part of information management, and business managers should become well versed in managing and leading this cutting edge technology. They need to clearly understand how IT components such as virtualization, automation and security fit into and define a Cloud. This course provides a Comprehensive overview of managing cloud computing. The course starts by developing a comprehensive technology foundation and then deals with the economics of cloud computing by analyzing its benefits, risks and obstacles. The course then examines Virtualization, Automation, and Security, the three essential components of cloud computing. Specific case studies on private and public clouds are illustrated. The course concludes with the development of specific templates and roadmaps that help an organization migrate from managing traditional IT into a cloud based infrastructure.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 9013 Design Thinking for Creative Problem Solving

    3 Credits
    This course explores creativity and design-led innovation, important notions in today’s world where companies are looking for creative, innovative and collaborative employees. This course deals in an applied and original way with the topic of creativity.  The assumption underlying the course is that there is no such thing as creativity as a concept but that there is a creative process involving people, materials and a context. The emphasis in the course is on experiencing different methods and techniques that can help us be more creative in our work practices, careers and lives. In sum, you will learn creative problem solving techniques and design thinking skills  to come up with new ideas and turn problems into opportunity while developing key skills for today’s organizations when they are looking at hiring people: communication and collaboration skills, project experience and a portfolio of innovative techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    MG-GY 9203 Seminar in Managing Knowledge-Workers in Innovative Organizations

    3 Credits
    Knowledge workers, who are primarily in professional and technical occupations, now represent the most important segment of the U.S. labor force. The success of innovative organizations today results largely from the knowledge and skills applied by their professional and technical employees. The effective management of such a work force is one of the most critical problems faced by innovative organizations in the private and public sectors. This seminar closely examines theory and research and various management techniques to improve the use and development of knowledge workers in innovative organizations.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 9213 Seminar in Information Systems Management

    3 Credits
    This course provides PhD-TM students and those in other related fields with a perspective on modern information-systems methodologies, technologies and practices. State-of-the-art research on frameworks for analysis, design and implementation of various types of information systems is presented. Also covered are economic and strategic issues related to information technology; the emphasis is on research in organizational, inter-organizational and strategic settings. The course follows a seminar format, and students are assigned paper-based and Web-based readings. Student’s contributions are expected during class sessions, both as participant and, for one class, as moderator.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 9223 Seminar in Business Process Innovation

    3 Credits
    This doctoral seminar explores dimensions and issues pertaining to the technology-business process interface that are critical to superior performance in today’s modern networked corporations. Students discuss how technology has affected everything from common business tasks to complex and global supply-chain integration. Qualitative and quantitative aspects in these areas are addressed. The class also discusses articles on leading-edge research and management thought. The underlying objective is to expose the student to the rich and emergent literature in modern supply-chain management, technology integration and business model evolution. Major seminar themes include technology integration, product and process innovation, marketing, logistics, operations, IT and channel management issues in supply chains across various industries. The seminar emphasizes understanding the role of technology in the supply chain and its relation to business processes and innovation.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 9233 Seminar in Managing Technological Change and Innovation

    3 Credits
    The objectives of this seminar are to familiarize students with the key viewpoints in the literature on technological innovation. Readings are selected to highlight the most important contributions to the literature by past and current academics. A critical analysis and review of this body of literature set the stage for future research work in this important management area.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 9243 Technology Management and Policy

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on the research related to macro-environment that influences and that is relevant to technology decision making, strategy and innovation in firms, government agencies, nonprofit institutions and other organizations. Primary concerns include introducing effective approaches for analyzing and evaluating societal-wide factors that influence innovation; assessing various attempts and policies for stimulating innovation in a city, region, nation or globally; exploring the role of technology and innovation in diverse managerial, economic and social contexts (e.g., advanced economies, rapidly emerging economies and Third World economies); the relationship between business-government and NGOs (non-government organizations) in promoting and sustaining innovation; the impact of global rivalry and global cooperation in the technology and innovation arena; and the place of technology and innovation in the post–Cold War era and in the early 21st century.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 9253 Technology Strategy, Structure and Decision Making

    3 Credits
    This course explores the most important and relevant theories and concepts related to technology strategy, structure and decision making. The emphasis is on understanding the useful application of such ideas for modern technology management and for designing effective scholarly research that deals with the strategic, structural and decision-making aspects of innovation and technology management.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 9263 Strategic Marketing Seminar

    3 Credits
    This course examines strategic marketing issues that face firms and industries from theoretical and empirical perspectives. The seminar looks at product design, positioning and strategy, distribution, sales force, design of the marketing organization, competition, market structure, problems of information, signaling and pricing, corporate reputation and branding, advertising and promotion, and recent advances in product and service development.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9273 Doctoral Seminar in Technology Adoption and Diffusion

    3 Credits
    This seminary familiarizes students with the key viewpoints in the literature of technology adoption and diffusion. Readings are selected to highlight the most important contributions to the literature by past and current academics. A critical analysis and review of this literature sets the stage for future research in this important management area.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9283 Doctoral Seminar on Entrepreneurship

    3 Credits
    This seminar familiarizes students with key viewpoints in the literature on entrepreneurship. Readings highlight the most important contributions to the literature by past and current academics. A critical analysis and review of this literature sets the stage for future research in this important management area.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9293 Seminar on Content Innovation

    3 Credits
    Because the Internet has evolved to provide a robust technology platform on which to create content, the notion of what comprises content has expanded to include not only one-dimensional content, (print newspapers, books and music recordings, the core output of traditional media companies) but also multidimensional, nonlinear content that can reside in physical, digital or hybrid (physical and digital) spaces. The popularization and proliferation of this new content has affected profoundly the development of the creative industries (e.g., publishing, newspapers, video games, fashion and music) and thus significantly challenges managers. This seminar explores the evolution of content innovation and focuses on several major issues, including the restructuring of creative industries and related managerial challenges resulting from developments in content innovation; the impact of restructuring creative industries on the development of urban centers of creativity and technoculture, such as Silicon Alley in New York City and Hollywood, California; the role of technology companies, particularly hybrid telecommunications/ content companies and how they intersect with the creative industries and influence content innovation; the media and its symbiotic relationship with politics.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9303 Advanced Topics—Organizational Behavior and Organizational Theory

    3 Credits
    This course familiarizes students with a broad range of theoretical perspectives in contemporary organization theory and organizational behavior. The course spans levels of analysis. It adopts mostly a practice perspective and focuses on meso-levels of analysis (inter-group collaboration and competition) and micro-levels of interpersonal and social psychological processes within organizations.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9313 Introduction to Behavioral Sciences

    3 Credits
    This interdisciplinary seminar is limited to doctoral students. The seminar focuses on behavioral sciences, the areas of inquiry relating to the human condition or human behavior. This definition encompasses a wide variety of disciplines, from the social sciences and humanities to a corner of the biological sciences. The fields of study are as diverse as comparative literature, geography, psychiatry and mathematics (to name just a few). The course focuses on sociology, anthropology, history and political science; the emphasis is on sociology. The course explores a number of topics (social order, social solidarity, conflict, social classes, status) that have generated strong interest among social scientists. The course and the final paper pay special attention to the process of developing original theoretical arguments, suitable for empirical exploration.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9321 Special Topics

    3 Credits
    This course requires individualized readings on special topics.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Note: Research methods seminars

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9323 Special Topics

    3 Credits
  
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    MG-GY 9343 Research Project in Organizational Behavior

    3 Credits
    This project integrates and applies advanced research techniques used in studies of organizations. Students develop and carry out individual applied research projects.

    Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing and MG-GY 6333  or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9403 Business Research Methods

    3 Credits
    This course introduces theory and techniques of business research methods. The course introduces the philosophy of science and the principles of investigation in the social sciences. Students learn to design a study, sample and choose a research design. Also discussed are basic data preparation, measurement and analysis procedures, focusing on univariate and multivariate statistics.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9413 Quantitative Methods Seminar I

    3 Credits
    The introductory PhD-level course covers quantitative analysis. Topics include specification, estimation and inference in the context of models that start with the standard linear regression framework. After reviewing the classical linear model, students develop the asymptotic distribution theory necessary for analyzing generalized linear and nonlinear models. Students then analyze estimation methods such as instrumental variables, maximum likelihood, generalized method of moments (GMM) and others. Inference techniques used in the linear regression framework (such as t and F tests) is extended to Wald, Lagrange multiplier, likelihood ratio and other tests. Finally, the linear regression framework is extended to models for panel data, multiple equation models and models for discrete choice.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9423 Quantitative Methods Seminar II

    3 Credits
    In this seminar, students gain an understanding of the theories underpinning economic and quantitative analysis in business. The seminar examines three different but interrelated academic disciplines to achieve this end: the axiomatic foundations of economics, the assumptions and methods that create the basis for game-theoretic analysis and the deviations from the economic rationality required by these methodologies that have been identified by the behavioral decision-making literature.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9433 Qualitative Research Methods

    3 Credits
    The course covers methods that allow students to enter natural social settings to capture data about human behavior in the actual contexts in which people pursue their daily lives. These methods include observation and interviewing. The emphasis is on studying close-up the worlds of other people. The course helps participants learn to make sense of data inductively, i.e., from the bottom up. This course is not about hypothesis testing. Rather, it is about building grounded theory. The focus is on coding and categorizing qualitative data (observational notes and interview transcripts). Students learn to go beyond journalistic description of data and use the analysis that characterizes good inductive social science.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Note: Independent Research

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9501 eMOT Capstone-1

    1.5 Credits
    First half of the eMOT Capstone course. Please see MG-GY 9503 MOT Capstone Project Course  for full description. Both MG 9501 and MG-GY 9511  courses may be taken in same semester.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9503 MOT Capstone Project Course

    3 Credits
    This course provides an integrative and state-of- the-art intellectual experience for participants at the conclusion of the program. The course is divided into two half semesters. The first half semester enables participants to focus on discerning the overarching trends which are driving innovation in various industry sectors. The class is divided into small groups each of which develops a comprehensive view of a particular industry sector. In the second half of the course, participants focus on the culminating project of the IM Program. Participants can choose to do their final projects on firms, issues related to technology management or as an outgrowth of the emphasis on entrepreneurship in the program, a business plan. Participants are encouraged to employ relevant concepts and insights that they have acquired during the course of the program.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9511 eMOT Capstone-2

    1.5 Credits
    Second half of the eMOT Capstone course. Please see MG-GY 9503 MOT Capstone Project Course  for full description. Both MG-GY 9501  and MG9511 courses may be taken in same semester.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9601 eIM Capstone-1

    1.5 Credits
    First half of the eIM Capstone course. Please see MG-GY 9603 eIM Capstone Project Course  for full description. Both MG 9601 and MG-GY 9611  courses may be taken in same semester.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9603 eIM Capstone Project Course

    3 Credits
    This course provides an integrative and state-of-the-art intellectual experience for participants at the conclusion of the program. The course is divided into two half semester. The first half semester enables participants to focus on discerning the overarching trends which are driving innovation in various industry sectors. The class is divided into small groups each of which develops a comprehensive view of a particular industry sector. In the second half of the course, participants focus on the culminating project of the eIM program. Participants can choose to do their final projects on firms, issues related to technology management or as an outgrowth of the emphasis on entrepreneurship in the program, a business plan. Participants are encouraged to employ relevant concepts and insights that they have acquired during the course of the program.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9611 eIM Capstone-2

    1.5 Credits
    Second half of the eIM Capstone course. Please see MG-GY 9603 eIM Capstone Project Course  for full description. Both MG-GY 9601  and MG 9611 courses may be taken in same semester.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9651 The Modern CIO: Challenges and Opportunities

    1.5 Credits
    The Chief Information Officer (CIO) role has evolved from keeper of the infrastructure under the CFO, to an executive managing the organization’s information and sitting at the executive table. The CIO is the key strategic agent for the organizational use of technology and is the key agent in the creative-destructive process mediated by technology. Today technology is the single greatest factor in strategic change in a firm. The CIO is the executive best positioned to manage the creative-destructive power of technology and effect firm sustainability in the face of massive changes in markets. This course helps aspiring CIOs investigate this new and evolving role, using presentations, research and interviews of industry and public sector CIOs and CTOs as well as studying the market demands for CIOs and CTOs.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9683 Internship and Action Learning

    3 Credits
    This course provides graduate students the opportunity to work in an organization relevant to their field of interest in an action-learning context under faculty supervision. It exposes graduate students to relevant, state-of-the-art and best practices in modern management from the perspective of reflective involvement and interaction in the field. Students submit a paper and oral presentation based on work accomplishments as well as a review of written evaluation by the onsite supervisor. This course may be taken only once.

    Prerequisite(s): Approval of the Program Director
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9691 The Modern Chief Information Security Officer: Challenges and Opportunities

    1.5 Credits
    The role of Chief Cyber Security Officer or Chief Information Security Officer has evolved from securing computer systems under the CIO to an executive managing the organization’s information security and sitting at the executive table. The officer is a key strategic agent for the organizational use of cyberspace. The CISO has become the key player in the increasingly dangerous and insecure area of cyberspace, where firms must operate for maximum competitive advantage. The CISO is the executive best positioned to manage the security of the firm’s assets/infrastructure and operations in cyberspace. This course helps aspiring CISOs investigate this new and evolving role, using lectures, research, and interviews of industry and public sector CISOs, as well as by studying the market demand for CISO positions.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9703 Project in Strategy and Innovation

    3 Credits
    This course integrates concepts and theories from several other courses. The course usually considers issues from a holistic and top-management perspective; employs case studies and projects to focus on key interrelationships between strategy, technology, innovation, corporate culture, organization structure and human factors; and covers domestic and global corporations, small, medium and large firms; and established and new enterprises.

    Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9753 Selected Topics in Management

    3 Credits
    Students analyze and discuss current topics in various fields.

    Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing and Department’s Chair’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9763 Readings in Management

    3 Credits
    This directed individual study of supervised readings explores advanced areas of management.

    Prerequisite(s): Department Chair’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9771 Readings in Management

    1.5 Credits
    This directed individual study of supervised readings discusses advanced areas of management.

    Prerequisite(s): Department Chair’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9781 Selected Topics in Management

    1.5 Credits
    Students analyze and discuss current topics in various fields.

    Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing and Department Chair’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9853 Selected Topics in Organizational Behavior

    3 Credits
    This course discusses and analyzes current topics in organizational behavior.

    Prerequisite(s): Advanced standing and instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9861 Readings in Organizational Behavior

    1.5 Credits
    Students undertake directed individual study or supervised readings in advanced areas of organizational behavior.

    Prerequisite(s): Academic Director’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9873 Readings in Organizational Behavior

    3 Credits
    This course emphasizes directed individual study or supervised readings in advanced areas of organizational behavior.

    Prerequisite(s): Program Director’s permission.
    Note: Course descriptions for other than Organizational Behavior courses can be found in the MS in Management [MSM] section of this catalog.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-GY 9913 Independent Research

    3 Credits
    In this course, students undertake directed individual study or supervised readings in advanced areas of the thematic electives and are advised by the doctoral adviser. Three credits required.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-UY 1002 Foundations of Management

    2 Credits
    This course introduces the principles and practices of management. Management is viewed as a system of tasks and activities, including environmental scanning, planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Within each major task, is a series of processes, which show how to do what has to be done. Management is a science and an art; both aspects of management are covered in this course. Major emphasis is on management history, philosophy and the theory and practice of management planning, decision making, organizing, motivating and leading.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-UY 2004 Management of Information Technology and Systems

    4 Credits
    This course provides a foundation to understand the role and potential contributions of information technologies and systems in business organizations–what they are, how they affect the organization and its employees, and how they can make businesses more competitive and efficient. The course focuses on the current state of IT in organizations; challenges and strategic use of IT; IT infrastructure and architecture; building, implementing and managing IT applications; and emerging issues such as intelligent systems, business-process reengineering, knowledge management and group-support systems.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-UY 2014 Operations Management

    4 Credits
    A firm has the opportunity to create competitive advantage through proficient operations management. To do so, the firm first must recognize and establish the strategic role of its operations within the organization. Then, at the more detailed operational level, the firm must execute effectively and efficiently. This course examines the strategic role that the operations function can play and offers specific tools and techniques that a firm can use during implementation.

    Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 1024  or MA-UY 1054  or MA-UY 1324  or any NYU Tandon Department of Mathematics approved Calculus I course.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-UY 2104 Organizational Behavior

    4 Credits
    This course focuses on the study of human behavior in innovative organizations. Emphasis is on teams, leadership, communication theory and organizational culture and structure. The course includes analyses of organizational behavior problems through case studies and participation in experiential learning.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-UY 2204 Financial Accounting

    4 Credits
    This course provides a solid foundation in constructing and interpreting financial statements. Topics include: accounting terminology, financial-statement preparation and analysis, liquidity and credit-risk ratios, depreciation calculations, revenue recognition, accrued liabilities and asset valuation. Also covered are the effects of equity transactions, cash flows and various accounting methods on financial statements.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-UY 2304 Marketing

    4 Credits
    This course is an undergraduate introduction to marketing. It discusses the fundamentals of marketing; e.g., the marketing mix, the role of the customer, marketing research and survey techniques. In addition, emerging marketing paradigms, like relationship marketing and online marketing, are introduced.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-UY 2524 Microeconomics

    4 Credits


    The course is an introduction to microeconomics. It assumes no prior knowledge of the subject. The course examines the fundamentals of microeconomics needed by technologists, relying to a considerable extent upon mathematical expression and representation. The principle topics covered are price theory, production and cost theory, the theory of the firm and market theory, including the practical relevance of these to the management of technology-intensive enterprises. The role of the state and of government regulation will be considered as a special topic.

    Note: Students who take this course cannot receive credit for ECON-UA2 or FIN-UY 2003.

     

    Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 1024  or MA-UY 1054  or MA-UY 1324  or an approved equivalent.
    Also listed under: SEG-UY 2524
    Note: MG-UY 2524 may count toward the Tandon HuSS elective requirement. There is no link at this time to SEG-UY 2524.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4

  
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    MG-UY 3002 Project Management

    2 Credits
    This course provides students with practical and best-practice project management theory, concepts and (hands-on) practical experience so that they may contribute effectively to and lead multicultural team projects framed for the new global economy. The practical component includes a team-based project that spans the duration of the course.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-UY 3024 Management of Data Communications and Networking

    4 Credits
    This course introduces the fundamentals of modern telecommunications and networking such as components of data communication, data transmission, open-system interconnection (OSI), TCP/IP and other models, data link and network layers and local area networks (LANs). The course focuses on managerial issues related to the management of data communications and networking technologies.

    Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 1024  or MA-UY 1054  or MA-UY 1324  and MA-UY 1124  or MA-UY 1154  or MA-UY 1424  or any NYU Tandon Department of Mathematics approved Calculus I (4 cr) and Calculus II (4 cr) courses. Also MG-UY 2004 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-UY 3204 Introduction to Finance

    4 Credits
    This course introduces business finance for BTM majors. It emphasizes the financing and investment decisions of the financial manager, with special emphasis on examples from technological environments. Included are topics such as time value of money, asset valuation, risk analysis, financial statement analysis and capital budgeting.

    Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 1024  or MA-UY 1054  or MA-UY 1324  and MA-UY 1124  or MA-UY 1154  or MA-UY 1424  or any NYU Tandon Department of Mathematics approved Calculus I (4 cr) and Calculus II (4 cr) courses. Also MG-UY 2204 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-UY 3214 Advanced Corporate Finance

    4 Credits
    This course builds on the principles of basic corporate finance covered in MG-UY 3204 . It prepares students to understand financial theory and how firms use modern finance for strategic and tactical decision-making. The critical issue of how these decisions affect the value of a firm and the returns of assets is addressed. Major topics include bond valuation, the CAPM model, portfolio design and modeling and option pricing using the Black-Scholes model. A strong emphasis is placed on using spreadsheets as a financial-modeling tool.

    Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 1024  or MA-UY 1054  or MA-UY 1324  and MA-UY 1124  or MA-UY 1154  or MA-UY 1424  or any NYU Tandon Department of Mathematics approved Calculus I (4 cr) and Calculus II (4 cr) courses. Also MG-UY 3204 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-UY 3304 Introduction to Supply Chain Management

    4 Credits
    This course provides an undergraduate-level introduction to supply-chain management. The underlying objective is to introduce key supply-chain management concepts and examine relevant business practice. This course enables students to develop useful skills, in an increasingly global context, to analyze marketing, logistics, operations and channel management issues.

    Prerequisite(s): MG-UY 2004 , MG-UY 2304  and MA-UY 2054  or MA-UY 2224  or MA-UY 2212  with MA-UY 2222 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-UY 3404 Innovation Management

    4 Credits
    This course examines the key managerial features of technology-enabled innovation and new product development. It focuses on accessing innovative capabilities through R&D, acquisition, alliances, joint ventures and innovation- friendly cultures and organizations. The key perspective underlying this course is managerial. Although the innovation activities studied are overwhelmingly technology enabled ones, success is largely determined by managerial factors. The interplay between the technology and management leading to innovation is a major concern of the discussion and work in this course.

    Prerequisite(s): Junior student status.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-UY 4004 Management Strategy in Technology Sectors

    4 Credits
    This course provides an overview of the process of implementing a successful management strategy in an information-technology and knowledge-intensive environment. Fundamental topics include the development of strategic vision, objectives and plans; implementation of strategy and the evaluation of performance; industry and competitive analysis; SWOT analysis and competitive advantage and sustained advantage. Advanced concepts include strategic positioning in global markets, Internet strategy, strategy in diversified firms and interactions between organizational structure and strategy and between ethics and strategy.

    Prerequisite(s): MG-UY 3204  and MG-UY 3404 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-UY 4014 Introduction to E-Business

    4 Credits
    Since its introduction, the Internet has changed how businesses work. In addition to creating new opportunities, the Internet has revolutionized existing businesses and entire industries. This course provides an undergraduate- level introduction to e-business. The main objectives of this course are to (1) provide a hands-on introduction to the emerging area of e-Business, (2) discuss the major business concepts and issues in this domain and (3) develop high-quality content based on team discussion and individual/group research.

    Prerequisite(s): MG-UY 3204 , MG-UY 3002 , MG-UY 3214  or MG-UY 3304  and MG-UY 3404 . Note: Required course for BTM majors matriculated before Fall 2014. For post-Fall 2014 matriculants, course may only be used as a Free Elective towards the 127/128 BTM degree.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-UY 4111 Special Topics in Management (1 Cr)

    1 Credits
    Focus on a special topic in Management under the guidance of TM&I faculty member.

    Note: Pre-approval required by BS BTM Program Director or TM&I Department Chair.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-UY 4112 Special Topics in Management (2 Cr)

    2 Credits
    Focus on a special topic in Management under the guidance of TM&I faculty member.

    Note: Pre-approval required by BS BTM Program Director or TM&I Department Chair.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-UY 4113 Special Topics in Management (3 Cr)

    3 Credits
    Focus on a special topic in Management under the guidance of TM&I faculty member.

    Note: Pre-approval required by BS BTM Program Director or TM&I Department Chair.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    MG-UY 4114 Special Topics in Management (4 Cr)

    4 Credits
    Focus on a special topic in Management under the guidance of TM&I faculty member.

    Note: Pre-approval required by BS BTM Program Director or TM&I Department Chair.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
 

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