2016-2018 Undergraduate and Graduate Bulletin (with addenda) 
    
    Jul 21, 2019  
2016-2018 Undergraduate and Graduate Bulletin (with addenda) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


A Brief Guide to Course Descriptions

Each program described in this catalog contains detailed descriptions of the courses offered within the program.

The first line gives the official course number for which students must register and the official course title. The letters indicate the discipline of the course and the first number of the official course numbers indicates the level of the course. The levels are as follows:

  • 1XXX - Freshman Level
  • 2XXX - Sophomore Level
  • 3XXX - Junior Level
  • 4XXX - Senior Level
  • 5XXX to 9XXX - Graduate level

Typically the last number of the course number indicates the number of credits. The breakdown of periods of the course is also listed.

When selecting a course for registration, the section of the course may include the following notations:

  • “LEC” - lecture section
  • “RCT” or “RC” - recitation section
  • “LAB” or “LB” - lab section

Additionally, any other letter or digit listed in the section will further identify the section and being liked to another section of the class with the same letter and/or digit combination. Further information on sections is available from academic advisers during registration periods.

The paragraph description briefly indicates the contents and coverage of the course. A detailed course syllabus may be available by request from the office of the offering department.

“Prerequisites” are courses (or their equivalents) that must be completed before registering for the described course. “Co-requisites” are courses taken concurrently with the described course.

The notation “Also listed…” indicates that the course is also given under the number shown. This means that two or more departments or programs sponsor the described course and that students may register under either number, usually the one representing the student’s major program. Classes are jointly delivered.

 

Civil Engineering

  
  •  

    CE-GY 8773 Dispute Avoidance and Resolution

    3 Credits
    This course analyzes the basic causes for construction disputes and introduces methods for dispute avoidance by proper risk allocation, management and control, as well as other techniques, including partnering. It uses the case study method to address litigation and provides an understanding of the process of arbitration and other alternative dispute resolution (ADR) methods such as negotiation, mediation, mini trials and dispute review boards.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Exec 21 Program or permission of a Construction Management Program Director.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-GY 8783 Construction Management and Planning

    3 Credits
    Strategic planning is indispensable to achieving superior management. This course in business planning provides practical advice for organizing the planning system, acquiring and using information and translating strategic plans into decisive action. This knowledge is an invaluable resource for top and middle-level executives.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Exec 21 Program or permission of a Construction Management Program Director.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-GY 8803 Infrastructure Planning for Public Works

    3 Credits
    This course deals with the process whereby infrastructure projects are conceived, studied and implemented. The focus will be on the management and leadership roles of the key players in public works agencies. Lectures, reading assignments and classroom discussions will deal with both routine procedures and controversial issues. Students will research and report on important public works projects and on special topics in infrastructure planning.

    Prerequisite(s): Admission to the Exec 21 Program or permission of a Construction Management Program Director.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-GY 9105 Principles of Professional Practice I: Ethics

    .5 Credits
    Principles of Professional Practice I provides graduate students with a foundation for success in the professional disciplines offered by the Department of Civil and Urban Engineering. This course combines (1) an online educational module related to Ethics, (2) an immersive internship in a civil engineering practice area.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate students with a minimum of 18 graduate credits and in good academic standing prior to the start of the internship. Permission of CUE Department.
  
  •  

    CE-GY 9205 Principles of Professional Practice II: Management

    .5 Credits
    Principles of Professional Practice II provides graduate students with a foundation for success in the professional disciplines offered by the Department of Civil and Urban Engineering. This course combines (1) an online educational module related to Management of engineering projects, (2) an immersive internship in a civil engineering practice area.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate students with a minimum of 18 graduate credits and in good academic standing prior to the start of the internship. Permission of CUE Department.
  
  •  

    CE-GY 9305 Principles of Professional Practice III: Leadership

    .5 Credits


    Principles of Professional Practice III provides graduate students with a foundation for success in the professional disciplines offered by the Department of Civil and Urban Engineering. This course combines (1) an online educational module related to Leadership, (2) an immersive internship in a civil engineering practice area.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate students with a minimum of 18 graduate credits and in good academic standing prior to the start of the internship. Permission of CUE Department.

     

     

     

     

     

  
  •  

    CE-GY 9903 Case Study in Urban Systems Engineering and Management

    3 Credits
    This comprehensive independent case study involves a specific urban infrastructure engineering and management project under faculty adviser guidance and generally is coordinated with a participating infrastructure agency. Case studies are submitted as formal reports and must be presented and defended formally. Students are expected to prepare a project report on a selected IMS in cooperation with an infrastructure agency.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-GY 9910 Seminar in Civil Engineering

    0 Credits
    Recent developments in civil engineering are presented by engineers from industry and academia.  Four semesters.

    Note: Open only to current PhD students

  
  •  

    CE-GY 9950 PhD Candidates Research Seminar

    0 Credits
    All PhD candidates (following the successful passage of the PhD Qualifying Examination) register for CE-GY 9950 (0 credits) - Research Seminar Course - every semester they are registered in PhD program.  The goals of this seminar program are to enhance the intellectual atmosphere of the department, to provide students opportunities to develop skills in publicly presenting research results, and to facilitate faculty monitoring of student research progress.

  
  •  

    CE-GY 9963 MS Project in Civil & Urban Engineering

    3 Credits
    This project involves analytical, design or experimental studies in civil engineering guided by a faculty adviser and following departmental guidelines. A written report is required.

    Prerequisite(s): Degree status and project adviser’s approval.
  
  •  

    CE-GY 9973 Thesis for MS in Civil Engineering

    3 Credits
    This course is an original investigation or design in the student’s principal field of study prepared and closely supervised by a faculty adviser. Candidates must successfully defend theses orally. Registration for a minimum of 6 credits is required.

    Prerequisite(s): Degree status and thesis adviser’s approval.
  
  •  

    CE-UY 499X BS Thesis in Civil Engineering

    Var. 1-3 Credits
    Honors Program students can produce a BS Thesis on a topic of interest to them under faculty advisement.  A research project is carried out in traditional and emerging areas of civil engineering.  Students are required to submit a bound thesis to the Office of Undergraduate Academics.

    Prerequisite(s): Honors Program status and permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
  
  •  

    CE-UY 1002 Introduction to Civil Engineering

    2 Credits
    This course introduces the student to the profession and practice of civil engineering. The course has four primary components: (1) a review of the principal sub disciplines of civil engineering and their relationship to urban and regional infrastructure; (2) a review of professional ethics and the responsibilities of engineers to their profession and to the general public, which includes a detailed study and discussion of the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) and National Society of Professional Engineers (NSPE) codes of practice, and the use of case studies for illustration and discussion; (3) the use of AutoCAD as a tool for computer-based drawings, and the use of spreadsheets to develop analytic algorithms to solve simple engineering problems; and (4) an introduction to the use of GIS. The course includes a laboratory on the use of AutoCAD, as well as on GIS. Each laboratory is 6-7 weeks long.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 1502 Leadership and Foundations of Construction Management

    2 Credits
    This course introduces the student to the profession of construction management. It focuses on the role of the construction manager and the fundamental concepts and terminology employed in planning, developing and constructing projects. Leadership, professional development, ethics and safety are emphasized.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 2113 Statics

    3 Credits
    This course covers: Vector treatment of static and dynamic equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies; equivalent forces and couple systems; distributed forces; static analysis of determinate trusses, frames and machines; friction; centroid and center of gravity, and moment of inertia.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 1013  (grade of C or higher) and MA-UY 1024  and MA-UY 1324  or equivalent (grade of C or higher).
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 1
  
  •  

    CE-UY 2123 Mechanics of Materials

    3 Credits
    This course introduces basic principles of stress and strain in axial loading, shear, torsion and bending, along with principles of transformation of stress for design. Laboratory experiments provide hands-on experience.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 1013  and CE-UY 2113  or equivalents with a grade of C or better.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 2213 Fluid Mechanics and Hydraulics

    3 Credits
    This course examines the basic principles of fluid mechanics with beginning applications to hydraulic design. Topics include fluid properties, fluid statics, elementary fluid dynamics and Bernoulli equation, continuity, energy and momentum equations and fluid kinematics. Additional topics are laminar and turbulent flow, boundary layer characteristics, drag and lift concepts (flow over immersed bodies), dimensional analysis and fluid measurements.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 2113  or equivalent.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 2323 Traffic Engineering I

    3 Credits
    This course covers the fundamentals of traffic engineering.  The characteristics of traffic streams, and how they are quantitatively described is included.  The course covers an overview of traffic control and operations, including the timing and design of pre-timed and actuated signals.  An introduction to highway capacity and level of service analysis is included, and the analysis of basic freeway segments and multilane highways is covered as an example of this type of analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1002   or CE-UY 1502  or permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
    Also listed under: CE-UY 3303
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 2343 Transportation Engineering

    3 Credits
    This course provides an introduction to transportation engineering.  The course will cover travel demand forecasting, road user and vehicle characteristics, traffic engineering studies, engineering economic analysis, and highway design.  The highway design element will focus on the basic design concepts of horizontal and vertical alignment, superelevation, and cross-section design.  The course will also cover flexible pavement design, design of parking facilities, as well as bikeway and walkway design.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1002   or CE-UY 1502  or permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 2504 Construction Modeling and Data Structures I

    4 Credits
    This course introduces architectural drafting and computer graphics. It capitalizes on state-of- the-art computer applications in managing construction. The course familiarizes the student with two-dimensional construction drawings that represent the current industry standard, and it propels the student towards the future by teaching the basics of three-dimensional (3-D) computer modeling. This course also introduces the use of the 3-D model with associated databases to manage construction.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1502  or CE-UY 1002  or permission of the Construction Management Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 2513 Construction Materials and Methods

    3 Credits
    This course introduces students to traditional and emerging materials and methods employed in building and civil infrastructure projects. The course will also address safety, regulation, constructability and sustainability from planning through design and construction.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1502  or CE-UY 1002  or permission of the Construction Management Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 2523 Contracts and Construction Documents

    3 Credits
    This course covers the documents used in design and construction, including design and construction agreements, drawings and specifications, general and special conditions and others used for procurement and construction administration. The course also examines the relationships among the owner, designers, contractors and suppliers. Students have the opportunity to discuss quality, safety and business and professional ethics.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1502  or CE-UY 1002  or permission of the Construction Management Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3122 Structural Dynamics

    2 Credits
    This course covers: Three-dimensional treatment of the kinetics of particles and rigid bodies using various coordinate systems; Newton’s law, work, energy, impulse and momentum; and an introduction to dynamics of one, two and multi-degree of freedom systems, with and without damping.

    Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 2034  (or MA-UY 2012 ) and CE-UY 2113  or equivalent. Corequisite(s): CE-UY 3133  or equivalent.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3133 Structural Analysis

    3 Credits
    This course offers in-depth coverage of structural analysis techniques. Topics: analysis of statically determinate structures; deflection calculations using energy methods; analysis of statically indeterminate structures using superposition; influence lines; and slope deflection, moment distribution and matrix analysis of structures. Computer applications are included.

    Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 2034   and  CE-UY 2123  or CE-UY 2113  with a grade of B+ or better (for Brooklyn Engineering Students) or MATH-AD 116 and MATH-AD 121 and ENGR-AD 237 or ENGR-AD 111 (for Abu Dhabi Students).
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 1
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3143 Steel Design

    3 Credits
    This course examines structural design principles and techniques. Topics: Design of steel tension members, beams and columns; design of beam-columns; and design of bolted and welded connections for steel design. The course includes a design laboratory in which students, working in groups, develop design projects.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 3133  or equivalent.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3153 Geotechnical Engineering

    3 Credits
    This course covers: Introduction to soil mechanics and foundation engineering, including origin of soils; phase relationships; classification of soils; permeability; effective stress; seepage; consolidation; shear strength; slope stability; and bearing capacity.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 2123  and CE-UY 2213  or equivalents (for Brooklyn Engineering Students) or ENGR-AD 237 and ENGR-AD 231 (for Abu Dhabi Students).
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3161 Materials Engineering Laboratory

    1 Credits
    This laboratory course consists of a series of experiments to test various engineering properties of common civil engineering materials including metals, aggregates, concrete, timber, and polymer composites.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 2123  or equivalent.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 0 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3162 Materials Engineering

    2 Credits
    This course covers all commonly used civil engineering materials: metals, concrete, masonry, timber, asphalt, and polymer composites. It emphasizes fundamental materials science, production and processing, engineering properties, chemical durability, and practical applications. Materials sustainability and latest development in innovative materials and technology are also covered.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 2123  or equivalent. Corequisite(s): CE-UY 3161  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3173 Structural Design

    3 Credits
    This course covers steel and reinforced concrete structural design principles and practices, including: reinforced concrete beams, columns, slabs and footings, steel tension, compression and flexural members, beam-columns, and bolted connections

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 3133  or equivalent (for Brooklyn Engineering Students) or ENGR-AD 336 (for Abu Dhabi Students).
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3223 Environmental Engineering I

    3 Credits
    This course introduces water and wastewater treatment. Topics: Stream assimilation and public health; introduction to air pollution and solid waste management; and laboratory analysis of water and wastewater samples and treatment process tests.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2033  and   or equivalent (for Brooklyn Engineering Students) or ENGR-AD 231 and permission of department (for Abu Dhabi Students).
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3243 Water Resources Engineering I

    3 Credits
    This course provides a detailed overview of water resources engineering, including both analysis and design elements. Topics covered: open-channel flow; pipe networks; reservoir balances; hydrologic techniques; surface water and ground-water supplies; water demand; and development of water resources for multiple purposes.

    Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 2224  and CE-UY 2213  or equivalent (for Brooklyn Engineering Students) or ENGR-AD 231 and permission of department (for Abu Dhabi Students).
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3303 Traffic Engineering

    3 Credits
    This course covers the fundamentals of traffic engineering. The characteristics of traffic streams, and how they are quantitatively described is included. The course covers an overview of traffic control and operations, including the timing and design of pre-timed and actuated signals. An introduction to highway capacity and level of service analysis is included, and the analysis of basic freeway segments and multilane highways is covered as an example of this type of analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1002  or CE-UY 1502  or permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3313 Introduction to Transportation Systems

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on the fundamental conceptual elements of transportation systems and describes the approaches used to analyze and design transportation systems. The course covers the basic material about transportation systems, the context within which they operate and a characterization of their behavior.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1002   or CE-UY 1502  or permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3333 Transportation Systems and Software

    3 Credits
    This course covers transportation software and its applications in understanding the impacts of traffic demand on the transportation system.  Simulation software will be used to test the impacts of various signal timings and progressions on an arterial and a network.  Fundamental concepts of signal coordination and progression will be treated.  The Highway Capacity Software (HCS) package will be used to examine the effects of traffic on individual intersection delay and level of service.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1002   or CE-UY 1502  or permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3353 History of the New York City Transit System

    3 Credits
    This course traces the technological history of public transportation in New York City and investigates its role in the development of the city, its economy and its social fabric. From the early days of horse-drawn public carriages to the modern subway system, the role of the public transit in the historical development patterns of New York City is treated. The course covers trolley systems, the age of the elevated railways and the subway system. Political, social and economic issues involved in the development of these critical infrastructures are discussed. Students develop independent project reports on aspects of the NYC public transit system, or on public transit systems in other major world cities.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1002   or CE-UY 1502  or permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3363 Transportation Economics

    3 Credits
    This course introduces the principles of engineering economic analysis and applies them to the analysis of transportation alternatives. The cost elements of transportation systems are presented and discussed.  The course also reviews existing measures and legislation that provide funding for transportation projects, and discusses potential new approaches for the future.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1002   or CE-UY 1502  or permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3373 Transportation Systems Analytics

    3 Credits
    This course teaches students introductory methods to design transportation systems and informatics to evaluate the behavioral response of travelers. It trains students in fundamental problem solving skills needed to manage cyber-physical transportation networks in a smart cities era. The course is divided into three parts: (1) framework for analyzing urban systems under congestion and queueing, (2) intelligent transportation systems (ITS) to connect traveler decisions to system operations, and (3) constrained optimization methods to design and manage complex urban systems.

    Prerequisite(s): (MA-UY 2224  or an approved equivalent) or Adviser’s approval
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3383 Urban Informatics for Social Good

    3 Credits
    The vast amount of data generated from diverse data sources provides both an opportunity and a challenge to urban managers and decision-makers. The application of data-driven analytics to parse the detailed data that city agencies continually collect offers the opportunity to identify new areas for operational efficiencies, enhanced service delivery, and better informed policy design and implementation. When combined with other, correlative data sources - pulled from social media feeds, transit cameras, and myriad sensors - the potential increases significantly to understand and improve quality-of-life in cities. This course introduces students to computing methods in informatics and data science, and their applications to civil and urban engineering, urban policy, city management. Topics include structured and unstructured data, big data, urban sensing and IoT, predictive modeling, data cleaning and analysis, data visualization, and specific domain use cases.

    Corequisite(s): (MA-UY 2224  or an approved equivalent) and (CS-UY 1114  or an approved equivalent) or department permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3503 Cost Estimating

    3 Credits
    Students learn the classification of work, quantity surveying techniques and basic estimating principles applied to construction projects. Also addressed are contracts; specifications and other construction documents; and the identification and allocation of direct and indirect project costs, overhead and profit. Students are introduced to computer-based estimating techniques and software.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1502  or CE-UY 1002  or permission of the Construction Management Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3513 Construction Scheduling

    3 Credits
    Students learn to apply the Critical Path Method (CPM) to construction projects, using precedence diagram networks. The course covers sequencing, cost allocation, updating, cash flow, resource constraints and scheduling, manpower leveling and distribution, time-scale networks, lead and lag-time constraints, time-cost tradeoffs, overlap and other specific leading edge scheduling techniques. Students direct an entire project from planning through scheduling and control, both manually and through software.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1502  or CE-UY 1002  or permission of the Construction Management Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3533 Construction Site Layout and Surveying

    3 Credits
    This course studies the practical applications of surveying and its relationship to site planning and design.  The first portion of the course concentrates on land surveying concepts, including mathematics, horizontal and vertical control, and angle measurement.  The second portion of the course applies surveying data to site layout using traverses, area computations, property surveys, topography, and construction layout for highway and building applications.  This course also includes a field laboratory which introduces students to basic surveying practice, including the use of surveying equipment (wheels, tapes, levels, and theodolites), measurements theory and computation, data accuracy and precision, and the use of the field book to properly record data.
     

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1502  or CE-UY 1002  or permission of the Construction Management Program Advisor.
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3553 Non-Structural Building Systems

    3 Credits
    This course introduces the students to mechanical, electrical and vertical transportation systems for buildings. It examines fundamental aspects of the design, procurement and construction of heating, ventilating and air conditioning (HVAC), supply and sanitary plumbing, fire detection and suppression, high- and low-voltage electrical, security, elevator and escalator and building management systems.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1502  or CE-UY 1002  or permission of the Construction Management Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 3563 Construction Modeling and Data Structures II

    3 Credits
    This course is the continuation of the student’s exploration of construction management through building information modeling (BIM). The students will apply their understanding of construction assemblies, trade scheduling and estimating through studies of a larger project. Emphasis will be placed on the student’s ability to model complex assemblies while coordinating and scheduling multiple trades. This progressive approach incorporates the 3D model and the associated databases in the management of construction by developing unit pricing, detailed scheduling and procurement attributes associated with a design.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 2504 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 4033 Introduction to Urban Infrastructure Systems Management

    3 Credits
    This course provides students with an overview of key issues involved in the planning, management, operations and maintenance of urban infrastructure systems, including transportation, water supply, power, communications and information systems. It includes elements of engineering and technology, management, economics, finance, regulatory and public policy that have an impact on the sustainable development of the urban environment. The course features several distinguished guest lecturers from infrastructure industries and public agencies who share significant case studies with students. The course includes a component on GIS, with a focus on how to collect, integrate and share spatial data in urban infrastructure management. Group projects are required.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1002   or CE-UY 1502  or permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 4043 Sustainable Cities

    3 Credits
    The course provides an overview of issues that need to be addressed to make a city sustainable, beginning with a definition of what is intended by the concept of sustainability and a discussion of what is the essence of a city. Students are asked to become familiar with the major challenges in making a city sustainable, and to provide, as part of their homework, a paper addressing a topic covered by the course through research and, where necessary, proposed solutions.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1002   or CE-UY 1502  or permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 4053 Biosoma - Environmental Design of the City of the Future

    3 Credits
    The goal of this course is to improve the engineering design of a city and its components. The course focuses on the city as an entity that concentrates living organisms, societal organizations and activities and machines, interacting with the environment both outside and inside the city. A number of essential questions about the future of cities will be examined, such as: (1) what does urbanization mean for the future of humankind in terms of resources, capabilities, ideologies and culture? (2) How can the design of cities affect their future? (3) What should be the role of the engineer? (4) How can the engineer of the future be prepared for that role? (5) What critical engineering interventions are needed to influence the future of today’s cities? Each student will select a project that deals with some aspects of the course and present its results to the class.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1002   or CE-UY 1502  or permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 4092 Leadership, Business Principles, Policy and Ethics in Civil Engineering

    2 Credits
    This course is in seminar form and is required of all senior students in Civil Engineering. It focuses on various aspect of professional practice in civil engineering, and it augments and enriches the student’s educational experience, including the capstone design course. Topics include professional roles and responsibilities, professional registration and its importance, continuing education, engineering ethics, procurement of work, competitive bidding, quality-based selection processes and construction management. Students are also introduced to the design and construction processes used by federal, state and local agencies, as well as private owners. The course includes a no-credit recitation that prepares students for the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) examination, which Civil Engineering students must take before graduation.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing or permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 3
  
  •  

    CE-UY 4153 Structural Design Project

    3 Credits
    This course covers the modeling, analysis and design of a steel or concrete building structure. Fundamental concepts of structural analysis and design are reinforced and applied. Computer-aided structural analysis and design software is introduced and utilized as in professional practice. Students may work individually or in groups to prepare interim and final reports.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 3173  (for Brooklyn Engineering Students) or ENGR-AD 337 and ENGR-AD 338 (for Abu Dhabi Students).
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 1.5
  
  •  

    CE-UY 4173 Foundation Engineering

    3 Credits
    This course introduces the development of foundation engineering, including: site exploration; soil sampling; interpretation of boring logs; bearing capacity of footings; settlement of structures; lateral earth pressure; design of retaining walls, braced excavations and sheet pile walls; and design of deep foundations.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 3153   or equivalent (for Brooklyn Engineering Students) or ENGR-AD 342 (for Abu Dhabi Students).
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 4193 Timber and Masonry Structures

    3 Credits
    This course covers: Properties and classification of structural lumber; design of timber connectors; design and construction of residential and industrial timber buildings; beams, frames, columns and trusses of sawn lumber and glued laminated construction; manufacture and properties of concrete masonry units; properties of mortar and grout; and design and construction of load-bearing, reinforced and unreinforced masonry structural elements.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 3133   or equivalent
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 4253 Hydraulic Systems

    3 Credits
    The application of basic principles of fluid mechanics and water resources in hydraulic engineering and design. Topics covered include: laminar and turbulent flow; boundary layer characteristics; subcritical and super critical flow; applications to pipe and open channel flow; pipe networks; hydraulic machinery and structures; river and canal systems and flood plains; safety; and reliability issues.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 3243  or equivalent.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 4263 Environmental Geotechnology

    3 Credits
    This course benefits students who are entering the consulting industry. It is difficult to separate environmental and geotechnical concerns in the urban environment. This course teaches students what environmental concerns to expect when planning construction projects, investigating sites and overseeing construction. The course covers methods for addressing these concerns. Topics covered include clay mineralogy, soil/water/contaminant interactions, interfacial tension and capillarity and remediation techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 3153  and CE-UY 3223  or equivalents.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 4273 Environmental Engineering II

    3 Credits
    This course offers detailed coverage of water and wastewater treatment unit operations and includes a laboratory on processes and process design. Experiments are performed to evaluate laboratory-scale conventional water and waste treatment processes. Lectures cover detailed theory, design and advanced concepts.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 3223   or equivalent.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    CE-UY 4443 Sensing the City: Methods for Urban Health Monitoring

    3 Credits
    Considering cities as networks of people, infrastructure and the natural environment, this course introduces approaches for monitoring the function and state of wellness of the urban environment including energy, waste, air quality, land use, patterns of activity and mobility. As the world’s urban population grows equivalent to four time the population of New York City every year, the quantitative analysis of key attributes of cities and characterization of the chronological changes has become the engine for advancing urban operations and policies. We will examine methods for tracking the state of health of a city’s infrastructure, environment, the ecosystem, and its inhabitants. This is achieved by introducing the students to fundamental of sensing and data acquisition, followed by exercises and case studies with applications.

    Prerequisite(s): (PH-UY 1013  or equivalent) and (CM-UY 1004  or equivalent) or adviser’s approval
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    CE-UY 4503 Construction Engineering

    3 Credits
    This course covers engineering fundamentals and developing trends in the use of excavating and earth-moving equipment, trucks, pumps, drilling and blasting equipment and cranes. Also considered are shoring and bracing and other temporary site construction operations.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1502  or CE-UY 1002 , and junior standing or permission of the Construction Management Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    CE-UY 4513 Construction Project Administration

    3 Credits
    This course examines the roles of the project participants in executing a construction project, focusing on delegating administrative duties and responsibilities and managing and coordinating the physical work and administrative control of project information and records. Students use computer-based project administration techniques and software.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1502  or CE-UY 1002 , and junior standing or permission of the Construction Management Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    CE-UY 4523 Structural Building Systems

    3 Credits
    This course introduces the general principles of loads on buildings and the design and analysis of conventional structural building systems in steel, concrete, wood and masonry. It also addresses the construction of such systems.

    Prerequisite(s): CN major, CE-UY 2123 , and junior standing or permission of the Construction Management Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 4533 Construction Law

    3 Credits
    The course introduces students to areas of the law that they are likely to encounter in construction. Following an introduction to the legal system and form of legal analysis, areas addressed include contracts, procurement, scope definition, delays and acceleration, site conditions, warranties, termination, tort claims, dispute resolution and ethics.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1502  or CE-UY 1002 , and junior standing or permission of the Construction Management Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    CE-UY 4543 Construction Management Project

    3 Credits
    This course is the senior capstone experience in construction management which requires students to demonstrate the skills acquired through the undergraduate construction management curriculum. Students work individually or in groups as determined by the instructor and other participating industry advisers. Students attend regularly scheduled lectures and workshops, participate in interim and final presentations, and are responsible for periodic written submissions.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and permission of the Construction Management Program Director.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    CE-UY 4613 Selected Topics in Structural and Geotechnical Engineering

    3 Credits
    This course discusses unique topics of current interest in structural and geotechnical engineering. The course may feature a detailed look at a single topic or a series of focused topical presentations.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    CE-UY 4623 Selected Topics in Environmental and Water Resources Engineering

    3 Credits
    This course examines unique topics of current interest in environmental and water resources engineering. The course may feature a detailed look at a single topic or a series of focused topical presentations.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    CE-UY 4633 Selected Topics in Transportation Engineering

    3 Credits
    This course explores unique topics of current interest in transportation engineering. The course may feature a detailed look at a single topic or a series of focused topical presentations.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    CE-UY 4643 Selected Topics in Construction Management

    3 Credits
    This course covers unique topics of current interest in construction management. The course may feature a detailed look at a single topic or a series of focused topical presentations.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Construction Management Program Advisor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 4710 Readings in Civil Engineering

    variable credit (1-4) Credits
    These readings in subjects related to the civil engineering curriculum are individually guided. Topics arise from a regular course and must extend and transcend material covered in the traditional curriculum. Students need prior approval of the instructor with whom he or she is to work and a topic approved by that instructor before registering for a readings course. Such courses require a written report on the subject of the student’s readings before a grade is given.

    Note: A student may take this course more than once.

  
  •  

    CE-UY 4812 Civil Engineering Design I: Site Planning and Design

    2 Credits
    This is the first part of a two-semester capstone design project course for Civil Engineers.  Each year a specific project will created.  Student groups will be formed, and each group will develop its plan and design for the assigned project.  Formal progress reports will be required, and a full design report will have to be prepared, submitted, and orally defended each semester.  The first semester focuses on site planning and design issues.  The main facility will be located on the site, and all site issues addressed:  grading and earthwork, traffic access and parking, water supply and sewage disposal, power supply and related issues.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 1002 CE-UY 2113 , CE-UY 2343 , CE-UY 2213 CE-UY 2123 
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 2.5 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CE-UY 4822 Civil Engineering Design II

    2 Credits
    This is the second part of a two-semester capstone design project course for Civil Engineers. Each year a specific project will be created. Student groups will be formed, and each group will develop its plan and design for the assigned project. Formal progress reports will be required, and a full design report will have to be prepared, submitted, and orally defended each semester.

    Prerequisite(s): CE-UY 4153   Corequisite(s): CE-UY 4812  (with advisor’s consent)
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2.5
  
  •  

    CE-UY 4990 Fundamentals of Engineering Exam Registration for CUE

    0 Credits
    This is a non-credited course that verifies registration by CUE students in required Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) exam. Department Consent required.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior standing and permission of the Civil Engineering Program Advisor.

Computer Science

Undergraduate Courses

Students are advised to consult the Schedule of Classes for changes in prerequisites effective after publication of this catalog. Students may not register for any junior- or senior-level courses until they complete all freshman requirements.

Graduate Courses

Graduate courses in computer science are regularly offered either every semester, annually or in two or three year cycles.

  
  •  

    CS-GY 997X MS Thesis in Computer Science

    Variable credits Credits
    Exceptional students may elect to write a master’s thesis for which no more than 6 credits may be earned toward the degree. Such research should demonstrate adequately the student’s proficiency in the subject material. Also required: oral thesis defense before at least three professors, plus a formal, bound thesis volume. Thesis registration must be continuous.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and satisfactory grades in prescribed courses.
  
  •  

    CS-GY 999X PhD Dissertation in Computer Science

    Variable credits Credits
    The dissertation is an original investigation of a computer-science problem. The dissertation must demonstrate creativity and include features of originality and utility worthy of publication in a recognized journal. Candidates must orally defend their dissertations successfully. Registration of 21credits and continuous dissertation registration are required.

    Prerequisite(s): Passing grade for RE 9990 PhD Qualifying Exam, graduate standing, and dissertation advisor approval
  
  •  

    CS-GY 5303 Introduction to Programming and Problem Solving

    3 Credits
    This course introduces discrete mathematics, computers and programming; Running C/C++ programs under Unix; algorithmic language; pseudo code; problem solving and program structure. Topics include constants, variable, data types, assignments, arithmetic expressions, input and output; object-oriented and top-down design and procedures, selection and loops; functions; enumerations; arrays, structs and searching and sorting.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status.
    Note: Online version available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 5403 Data Structures and Algorithms

    3 Credits
    This course introduces data structures. Topics include program specifications and design; abstract data types; stacks, queues; dynamic storage allocation; sequential and linked implementation of stacks and queues; sequential and binary search methods; binary trees and general trees; hashing; computational complexity; sorting algorithms: selection sort, heap sort, mergesort and quicksort; comparison of sorting techniques and analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and CS-GY 5303 .
    Note: Online version available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6003 Foundations of Computer Science

    3 Credits
    This course covers logic, sets, functions, relations, asymptotic notation, proof techniques, induction, combinatorics, discrete probability, recurrences, graphs, trees, mathematical models of computation and undecidability.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status. Corequisite(s): CS-GY 5303 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6005-6025 Variable Credit Project/ Course


    For students who need .5, 1, 1.5, 2 and 2.5 credit hours to meet graduation requirements, a project or special course is available with faculty approval.

  
  •  

    CS-GY 6033 Design and Analysis of Algorithms I

    3 Credits
    This course reviews basic data structures and mathematical tools. Topics: Data structures: priority queues, binary search trees, balanced search trees. Btrees. Algorithm design and analysis techniques illustrated in searching and sorting: heapsort, quicksort, sorting in linear time, medians and order statistics. Design and analysis techniques: dynamic programming, greedy algorithms. Graph algorithms: elementary graph algorithms (breadth-first search, depth-first search, topological sort, connected components, strongly connected components), minimum spanning tree, shortest path. String algorithms. Geometric algorithms. Linear programming. Brief introduction to NP completeness.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status, CS-GY 5403  and CS-GY 6003 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6043 Design and Analysis of Algorithms II

    3 Credits
    This course covers techniques in advanced design and analysis. Topics: Amortized analysis of algorithms. Advanced data structures: binomial heaps, Fibonacci heaps, data structures for disjoint sets, analysis of union by rank with path compression. Graph algorithms: elementary graph algorithms, maximum flow, matching algorithms. Randomized algorithms. Theory of NPcompleteness and approach to finding (approximate) solutions to NPcomplete problems. Additional selected topics.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and CS-GY 6033 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6063 Software Engineering

    3 Credits
    The course emphasizes the full software-engineering approach with alternative approaches. Technical emphasis is on requirements, design, development, and modeling. Management issues include software cost estimate and project management. Understanding the processes applicable to the software development/ integration cycle and maintenance along with technology changes on quality and development activities is highlighted.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and CS-GY 5403 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6073 Software Engineering II

    3 Credits
    The course covers modern, advanced software engineering approaches with theory and practice orientations. Important design and management issues are analyzed and evaluated. Technical and management tradeoffs in distributed software systems are emphasized. An extensive number of real world case studies are assessed. A class project is required.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and CS-GY 6063 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6083 Principles of Database Systems

    3 Credits
    This course broadly introduces database systems, including the relational data model, query languages, database design, index and file structures, query processing and optimization, concurrency and recovery, transaction management and database design. Students acquire hands-on experience in working with database systems and in building web-accessible database applications.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status, CS-GY 6003  or equivalent, familiarity with basic data structures and operating system principles.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6093 Advanced Database Systems

    3 Credits
    Students in this advanced course on database systems and data management are assumed to have a solid background in databases. The course typically covers a selection from the following topics: (1) advanced relational query processing and optimization, (2) OLAP and data warehousing, (3) data mining, (4) stream databases and other emerging database architectures and applications, (5) advanced transaction processing, (6) databases and the Web: text, search and semistructured data, or (7) geographic information systems. Topics are taught based on a reading list of selected research papers. Students work on a course project and may have to present in class.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and CS-GY 6083  or equivalent, including experience with a relational database system.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6133 Computer Architecture I

    3 Credits
    Computer architecture design: Instruction set design techniques, performance and cost; Extensions to traditional instruction sets. An instruction set studied in detail. Processor implementations: Unpipelined execution and its improvement by means of pipelining. Advanced pipelining, including branch prediction, out-of-order execution and superscalar execution, is introduced. Alternatives to traditional computing, such as VLIW and vector computation are described. Improving computer capacity, by improving the memory hierarchy is studied, including advanced cache memory, main memory and virtual memory implementations. An introduction to high-performance computing, including multi-core processors.

    Prerequisite(s): CS-UY 2214 
    Note: Online version available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6143 Computer Architecture II

    3 Credits
    An overview of state-of-the-art single-core systems, including advanced pipelining, super-scalar, vector processors, VLIW and vector processing. High-performance computing systems: Computer systems that improve performance and capacity by exploiting parallelism. Selected topics in parallel computing are introduced, such as interconnection networks, parallel algorithms, GPUs, PRAMs, MIMD and SIMD machines. Alternatives to traditional computing are discussed, including GPUs, TPUs, systolic arrays, neural networks and experimental systems.

    Prerequisite(s): CS-GY 6133 
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6183 Fault-Tolerant Computers

    3 Credits
    This course introduces a variety of hardware and software techniques to design and model fault-tolerant computers. Topics include coding techniques (Hamming, SECSED, SECDED, etc.); majority voting schemes (TMR); software redundancy (Nversion programming); software-recovery schemes; network reliability design and estimation. The course introduces probabilistic methods for reliability modeling. Other topics: Examples from space fault tolerant systems, networks, commercial nonstop systems (TANDEM and STRATUS). RAID memory systems. Fault-tolerant modeling tools such as HARP, SHURE and SHARPE.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and CS-GY 6133 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6233 Introduction to Operating Systems

    3 Credits
    This course introduces basic issues in operating systems. Topics: Threads, processes, concurrency, memory management, I/O Control and case studies.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6243 Operating Systems II

    3 Credits
    This course surveys recent important commercial and research trends in operating systems. Topics may include virtualization, network server design and characterization, scheduling and resource optimization, file systems, memory management, advanced debugging techniques, data-center design and energy utilization.

    Prerequisite(s): CS-GY 6233 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6253 Distributed Operating Systems

    3 Credits
    This course introduces distributed-networked computer systems. Topics: Distributed control and consensus. Notions of time in distributed systems. Client/Server communications protocols. Middleware. Distributed File Systems and Services. Fault tolerance, replication and transparency. Peer-to-peer systems. Case studies of modern commercial systems and research efforts.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6273 Performance Evaluation of Computer Systems

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on modeling and performance analysis of computer systems. It concentrates on testing and evaluation of three-tiered distributed client/server and WEB-based systems and generally on distributed networking systems. The course presents and evaluates various systems architectures from a macro and micro viewpoint.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and EL-GY 5363  or MA-UY 2212 /MA-UY 2222  and instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6313 Information Visualization

    3 Credits
    An introductory course on Information Visualization based on a modern and cohesive view of the area. Topics include visualization design, data principles, visual encoding principles, interaction principles, single/multiple view methods, item/attribute, attribute reduction methods, toolkits, and evaluation. Overviews and examples from state-of-the-art research will be provided. The course is designed as a first course in information visualization for students both intending to specialize in visualization as well as students who are interested in understanding and applying visualization principles and existing techniques.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6323 Large-Scale Visual Analytics

    3 Credits
    Visual analytics combines interactive visual interfaces and information visualization techniques with automatic algorithms to support analytical reasoning through human-computer interaction. People use visual analytics tools and techniques to synthesize information and derive insight from massive, dynamic, ambiguous, and often conflicting data, and to communicate their findings effectively for decision-making. This course will serve as an introduction to the science and technology of visual analytics and will include lectures on both theoretical foundations and application methodologies. The goals of this course are for students to develop a comprehensive understanding of this emerging, multidisciplinary field, and apply that understanding toward a focused research problem in a real-world application or a domain of personal interest.

    Prerequisite(s): CS 6313
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6333 Massive Data Analysis

    3 Credits
    Big Data requires the storage, organization, and processing of data at a scale and efficiency that go well beyond the capabilities of conventional information technologies. In this course, we will review the state of the art in Big Data analytics. In addition to covering the specifics of different platforms, models, and languages, we will also look at real applications that perform massive data analysis and how they can be implemented on Big Data platforms. Topics we will discuss include: Map reduce/Hadoop, NoSQL stores, languages such as Pig Latin and JAQL, large-scale data mining and visualization. The course will primarily consist of technical readings and discussions. It will also include programming projects where the participants will prototype data-intensive applications using existing Big Data tools and platforms. |

    Prerequisite(s): CS 6083
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6373 Programming Languages

    3 Credits
    This course covers the structures, notations and semantics of programming languages. Topics: Issues of scope, type structure and parameter passing. Control structures, including support for exception handling and concurrency. Abstract data types and object oriented languages. Programming in the large. Implementation issues. Functional, logic programming languages. Examples from a variety of languages.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and CS-GY 5403 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6413 Compiler Design and Construction

    3 Credits
    This course covers compiler organization. Topics: Lexical analysis, syntax analysis, abstract syntax trees, symbol table organization, code generation. Introduction to code optimization techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): CS-GY 5403 , CS-GY 6133  and CS-GY 6033 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6513 Big Data

    3 Credits
    Big Data requires the storage, organization, and processing of data at a scale and efficiency that go well beyond the capabilities of conventional information technologies. In this course, we will study the state of art in big data management: we will learn about algorithms, techniques and tools needed to support big data processing. In addition, we will examine real applications that require massive data analysis and how they can be implemented on Big Data platforms. The course will consist of lectures based both on textbook material and scientific papers. It will include programming assignments that will provide students with hands-on experience on building data-intensive applications using existing Big Data platforms, including Amazon AWS. Besides lectures given by the instructor, we will also have guest lectures by experts in some of the topics we will cover.

    Prerequisite(s): Students should have experience in programming: Java, C, C++, Python, or similar languages, equivalent to two introductory courses in programming, such as “Introduction to Programming” and “Data Structures and Algorithms.
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6533 Interactive Computer Graphics

    3 Credits
    This course introduces the fundamentals of computer graphics with hands-on graphics programming experiences. Topics include graphics software and hardware, 2D line segment-scan conversion, 2D and 3D transformations, viewing, clipping, polygon-scan conversion, hidden surface removal, illumination and shading, compositing, texture mapping, ray tracing, radiosity and scientific visualization.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and CS-GY 5403  or equivalents and knowledge of C or C++ programming.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6543 Human Computer Interaction

    3 Credits
    Designing a successful interactive experience or software system takes more than technical savvy and vision–it also requires a deep understanding of how to serve people’s needs and desires through the experience of the system, and knowledge about how to weave this understanding into the development process. This course introduces key topics and methods for creating and evaluating human-computer interfaces/digital user experiences. Students apply these practices to a system of their choosing (I encourage application to prototype systems that students are currently working on in other contexts, at any stage of development). The course builds toward a final write-up and presentation in which students detail how they tackled HCI/user experience design and evaluation of their system, and results from their investigations. Some experience creating/participating in the production of interactive experiences/software is recommended.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6553 Game Design

    3 Credits
    This course is about experimental game design. Design in this context pertains to every aspect of the game, and these can be broadly characterized as the game system, control, visuals, audio, and resulting theme. We will explore these aspects through the creation of a few very focused game prototypes using a variety of contemporary game engines and frameworks, high-level programming languages, and physical materials. This will allow us to obtain a better understanding of what makes games appealing, and how game mechanics, systems, and a variety of player experiences can be designed and iteratively improved by means of rapid prototyping and play-testing. The course combines the technology, design, and philosophy in support of game creation, as well as the real-world implementation and design challenges faced by practicing game designers. Students will learn design guidelines and principles by which games can be conceived, prototyped, and fully developed within a one-semester course, and will create a game from start to finish. The course is a lot of (team)work, but it’s also a lot of fun. Programming skills are helpful, but not a hard requirement. Artistic skills, or a willingness to learn them are a plus.

    Prerequisite(s): CS-GY 6533  or OART-UT 1600 and OART-UT 1605 or instructor permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6573 Penetration Testing and Vulnerability Analysis

    3 Credits
    This advanced course in computer and network security focuses on penetration testing and vulnerability analysis. It introduces methodologies, techniques and tools to analyze and identify vulnerabilities in standalone and networked applications.

    Prerequisite(s): CS-GY 6823 .
    Note: Online version available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6613 Artificial Intelligence I

    3 Credits
    Artificial Intelligence (AI) is an important topic in computer science and offers many diversified applications. It addresses one of the ultimate puzzles humans are trying to solve: How is it possible for a slow, tiny brain, whether biological or electronic, to perceive, understand, predict and manipulate a world far larger and more complicated than itself? And how do people create a machine (or computer) with those properties? to that end, AI researchers try to understand how seeing, learning, remembering and reasoning can, or should, be done. This course introduces students to the many AI concepts and techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and CS-GY 5403 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6643 Computer Vision and Scene Analysis

    3 Credits
    An important goal of artificial intelligence (AI) is to equip computers with the capability of interpreting visual inputs. Computer vision is an area in AI that deals with the construction of explicit, meaningful descriptions of physical objects from images. It includes as parts many techniques from image processing, pattern recognition, geometric modeling, and cognitive processing. This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts and techniques in computer vision.

    Prerequisite(s): CS-GY 5403  or equivalent and proficiency in programming and familiarity with matrix arithmetic.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6673 Neural Network Computing

    3 Credits
    This course introduces neural network models and their applications. Topics: Discussion of organization and learning in neural network models including perceptrons, adalines, backpropagation networks, recurrent networks, adaptive resonance theory and the neocognitron. Implementations in general and special purpose hardware, both analog and digital. Application in various areas with comparisons to nonneural approaches. Decision systems, nonlinear control, speech processing and vision.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status and CS-GY 5403 ; some familiarity with matrix notation and partial derivatives is recommended.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    CS-GY 6703 Computational Geometry

    3 Credits
    This course introduces data structures and algorithms for geometric data. Topics include intersection, polygon triangulation, linear programming, orthogonal range searching, point location, Voronoi diagrams, Delaunay triangulations, arrangements and duality, geometric data structures, convex hulls, binary space partitions, robot motion planning, quadtrees, visibility graphs, simplex range searching.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
 

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