2016-2018 Undergraduate and Graduate Bulletin (with addenda) 
    
    Jul 21, 2019  
2016-2018 Undergraduate and Graduate Bulletin (with addenda) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


A Brief Guide to Course Descriptions

Each program described in this catalog contains detailed descriptions of the courses offered within the program.

The first line gives the official course number for which students must register and the official course title. The letters indicate the discipline of the course and the first number of the official course numbers indicates the level of the course. The levels are as follows:

  • 1XXX - Freshman Level
  • 2XXX - Sophomore Level
  • 3XXX - Junior Level
  • 4XXX - Senior Level
  • 5XXX to 9XXX - Graduate level

Typically the last number of the course number indicates the number of credits. The breakdown of periods of the course is also listed.

When selecting a course for registration, the section of the course may include the following notations:

  • “LEC” - lecture section
  • “RCT” or “RC” - recitation section
  • “LAB” or “LB” - lab section

Additionally, any other letter or digit listed in the section will further identify the section and being liked to another section of the class with the same letter and/or digit combination. Further information on sections is available from academic advisers during registration periods.

The paragraph description briefly indicates the contents and coverage of the course. A detailed course syllabus may be available by request from the office of the offering department.

“Prerequisites” are courses (or their equivalents) that must be completed before registering for the described course. “Co-requisites” are courses taken concurrently with the described course.

The notation “Also listed…” indicates that the course is also given under the number shown. This means that two or more departments or programs sponsor the described course and that students may register under either number, usually the one representing the student’s major program. Classes are jointly delivered.

 

History

  
  •  

    HI-UY 2514/W Introduction to New York City History

    4 Credits
    This course looks at the history and development of the City of New York, from Verazzano’s exploration to the present. Major themes include the evolution of the city’s political economy, political and economic influences on land and space use, and ethnic and class conflict in the urban environment.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    HI-UY 2534 History of Computing

    4 Credits
    This is a course about the history of the Computer Revolution and its causes, consequences, and meanings for modern society. Our goal is to provide students with the tools necessary for critically evaluating claims made about the role and in uence of computer technology in modern social, economic, and political life. By the end of the course, the students will have developed a nuanced understanding of the relationship between technology and society that moves beyond simplistic claims that “the computer changes everything” to encompass models of innovation that include not only technological invention but also social, legal, and economic developments as well.

    Prerequisite(s): EXPOS-UA 1 
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4
  
  •  

    HI-UY 2724 Urban Environmental History

    4 Credits
    This course will examine the development of cities, primarily in North America, the evolution of the technologies used for that development, and their effect on the natural environment of cities and their regions, and the effects of the modernization and electrification of rural America on cities. Students will use a broad toolkit of historical methods and modes, including environmental history, social history, world history and history of technology.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    HI-UY 3034 Introduction to Urban Infrastructure History

    4 Credits
    This survey of urban infrastructure history concentrates on water, sanitation and public health, electrical and communications systems, the development of housing and real estate, the security infrastructure and plans for the future, with one or two cities as a case study. The course explores how the urban political economy has shaped its physical environment and how technological innovations have made the city modern and postmodern.

    Prerequisite(s): EXPOS-UA 1 
    Note: Satisfies a HuSS elective.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4
  
  •  

    HI-UY 3034/W History of New York’s Urban Infrastructure

    4 Credits
    This survey of New York City’s infrastructure concentrates on water, sanitation and public health, electrical and communications systems, the development of housing and real estate, the security infrastructure and plans for the future. The course explores how the city’s political economy has shaped its physical environment and how technological innovations have made the city modern and postmodern.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    HI-UY 3244/W The History of Light

    4 Credits
    What is the nature of light? How does it relate to magnets, electric circuits, TVs, radioactivity and the fundamental forces of nature? More importantly, what really happens to your burrito when you microwave it? This course answers these and similar questions by following the historical development of three apparently distinct and unrelated phenomena- electricity, magnetism and light. Topics range from descriptions of these phenomena by the Greeks to Maxwell’s 19thcentury unification of them into a single phenomenon to Einstein’s theory of special relativity to their incorporation into the Standard Model of contemporary physics. The course considers theoretical descriptions of the phenomena and technologies derived from them.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    HI-UY 3254/W History of Mass Media

    4 Credits
    This mass-media history course examines broadsides, newspapers, cinema, radio, TV and the Internet, from the advent of cheap print in the early modern period to the turn of the 21st century. Themes include the history of mass-media technology, the mass dissemination of news and its effects on popular culture and gender relations, sensationalism, and the role of the media in developing advertising and consumer culture.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    HI-UY 3304 Science and Technology as a Strategic Resource in World War II

    4 Credits
    This course examines the role of technology and science during World War II. Among the technologies that are considered are some that were inherited from World War I and much improved (e.g., tanks, airplanes, aircraft carriers and submarines). Others were completely new and required considerable scientific input to be developed (e.g., radar, code breaking by the use of computers, jet engines, ballistic missiles, antibiotics and the atomic bomb).

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements  and One level 2 STS cluster course.
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    HI-UY 3434 History of Intellectual Property in America

    4 Credits
    This course, a history of successive regimes of patent, trade secret, copyright and trademark law from the early modern period to the present, introduces undergraduates to basic intellectual property concepts, language, the political and distributive implications of intellectual property regimes, and the possibility or even inevitability of alternative regimes.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
  •  

    HI-UY 4334W Seminar in Urban Infrastructure History

    4 Credits
    This seminar investigates the urban and environmental history of New York City’s infrastructure, including water, sewage, transportation, housing and office construction. The course investigates these systems in the context of the environmental, political and economic concerns that shape the city’s infrastructure. The course looks at the transnational circulation of ideas about designing and constructing urban systems. Questions include: How and why are infrastructure systems built? Why are they built the way they are? How do the technologies used affect the environment? Are the systems sustainable and interoperable? How do ideas about infrastructural needs, design and financing circulate transnationally?

    Prerequisite(s): HI-UY 3034/W  or instructor’s permission.
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4

Industrial Engineering

  
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    IE-GY 6003 Engineering Economics

    3 Credits
    Engineers are responsible for the design, development, deployment of products and projects and should evaluate alternatives when available.  Solutions run from the simple where the decisions are made quickly to detailed analysis of complex alternatives. Student will learn the necessary accounting terms, financial concepts, costing, investment analysis, time-value of money, equipment, and how material specifications are used in the investment decisions processes. Upon completion of the course, students will be able to quantity the alternatives used as part of the decision process in recommending what course of action to be taken.  The most economical choice may not be the recommended alternative based on other considerations i.e. political, past experience with suppliers, equipment standardization.

  
  •  

    IE-GY 6063 Work Design and Measurement


    Principles and techniques of designing work methods and work simplification programs.  Theory and techniques of workplace design, work measurement, time study, work sampling, standard data systems, methods analysis, rating, and work allowances.  Applications of ergonomics and anthropometrics to promote worker health and safety in lean manufacturing environments.

  
  •  

    IE-GY 6113 Quality Control and Improvement

    3 Credits
    This course provides students with a solid foundation in the cost of quality, quality assurance and quality management. Emphasis is on the basic tools of quality control such as control charts and their use, the concept of “out of control,” acceptance sampling, variables and attributes charts and producer’s and consumer’s risk. A unique aspect of this course is the demonstration of the power of teams of people with different expertise to improve quality. A course project is required.

    Prerequisite(s): MA-GY 6513  or familiarity with the concepts of probability and statistics.
    Also listed under: MN-GY 6113 .
    Note: Online version available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 6123 Quality Engineering Using Robust Design

    3 Credits
    This course provides a broad review of procedures to improve manufacturing quality. By employing both Taguchi techniques, such as the use of signal-to-noise ratio representations and other techniques less sensitive to parameter interactions, a full spectrum of robust design methods are presented. Applications of these procedures are reviewed, including online trouble-shooting methods to assure manufacturing quality.

    Prerequisite(s): IE-GY 6113 .
    Also listed under: MN-GY 6123 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 6163 Job and Workplace Design

    3 Credits
    This course examines theory, research and applications of job and workplace design. Job design is presented from an interdisciplinary perspective, focusing on how job design influences attitudes and work behavior within organizations. Students are exposed to diagnostic tools for measuring and evaluating jobs and the psycho-social aspects of the workplace environment, as well as the principles of work redesign. Topics include influences on work design by innovations in information technology, modern manufacturing, virtual work arrangements and open office systems; design and support of effective work teams; re-engineering and total quality management; and privacy and communication in the workplace.

    Also listed under: MG-GY 6163 .
    Note: Online version available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 6183 Inventory Models


    This course is offered irregularly in Response to industry demand.

  
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    IE-GY 6193 Production Planning and Control

    3 Credits
    This is a survey course in basic and advanced manufacturing planning and control systems, covering short-term forecasting systems, master production scheduling, material requirements planning, inventory management, capacity management, production activity control and just-in-time.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 6203 Project Planning and Control (Project Management)

    3 Credits
    This course discusses the knowledge and process required to manage a project through its life cycle, from concept to completion. Topics include engineering analysis, screening and selection, configuration and total quality management, scheduling using Program Evaluation and Review Technique (PERT) and Critical Path Method (CPM), budgeting and resource management, computer support and software. Case studies are used to illustrate the process.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 6213 Facility Planning and Design

    3 Credits
    Topics in this course include facilities design for global competitiveness, strategic master site planning, site selection, factory layout and design, facility-management systems and materials handling and storage planning. Also presented are guidance on selecting alternative facility plans and application of queuing methods and computer modeling for facility design and evaluation.

    Note: Online version available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 6273 Operations Research: Deterministic Models

    3 Credits
    Development of mathematical models for solving decision problems of deterministic nature. Classical optimization, Lagrange multipliers, linear programming, transportation method, network procedures, games. Dynamic programming.

    Prerequisite(s): Calculus.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 6273 Operations Research: Deterministic Models


    This course is offered irregularly in Response to industry demand.

  
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    IE-GY 6283 Operations Research: Stochastic Models

    3 Credits
    Mathematical models for solving decision problems of stochastic nature. Queuing, Markov processes, inventory models, reliability, probabilistic dynamic programming. IE-GY 6273  and IE 6283 constitute standard one-year survey course in operations research.

    Prerequisite(s): MA-GY 6813 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 6283 Operations Research: Stochastic Models


    This course is offered irregularly in Response to industry demand.

  
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    IE-GY 6453 Productivity Management

    3 Credits
    This course examines modern approaches to productivity measurement, evaluation, planning and improvement in both manufacturing and service industries. Participants develop productivity models for various types of organizations.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 6503 Queuing Systems I


    This course is offered irregularly in Response to industry demand.

  
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    IE-GY 6823 Factory Simulation

    3 Credits
    This course examines modeling and simulation of complex industrial, commercial and service systems, such as factories and hospitals. Students develop, run and test several simulation models using different software packages.

    Prerequisite(s): Computer literacy.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 6853 System Reliability


    This course is offered irregularly in Response to industry demand.

  
  •  

    IE-GY 7113 Engineering Applications in the Business Environment

    3 Credits
    This course fills the gap between theory and practice by immersing the student into actual engineering problems in operating businesses. Students work with an engineering manager in the client company and under the academic supervision of a faculty member to solve real engineering problems. Student will apply the knowledge acquired through course work to solving current industrial problems. By identifying a single project for the student, the course will focus on applying theory and academic knowledge to the analysis and improvement of the clients’ processes, products and operations. Students will experience the difference between the class room setting and business setting in applying engineering skills to problem solving. Students will experience the demands of meeting deadlines and providing cost – benefit solutions as professional engineers in the practice of engineering. This course provides the student with an opportunity to bridge the gap between theory and practice while still in school.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Instructor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 7213 Engineering Applications in the Business Environment

    3 Credits
    This course fills the gap between theory and practice by immersing the student into actual engineering problems in operating businesses. Students work with an engineering manager in the client company and under the academic supervision of a faculty member to solve real engineering problems. Student will apply the knowledge acquired through course work to solving current industrial problems. By identifying a single project for the student, the course will focus on applying theory and academic knowledge to the analysis and improvement of the clients’ processes, products and operations. Students will experience the difference between the class room setting and business setting in applying engineering skills to problem solving. Students will experience the demands of meeting deadlines and providing cost – benefit solutions as professional engineers in the practice of engineering. This course provides the student with an opportunity to bridge the gap between theory and practice while still in school.

    Prerequisite(s): Permission of the Instructor.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 7653 Human Factors in Engineering Design


    Human Factors is a body of knowledge about human abilities, human limitations, and other human characteristics that are relevant to design. Human factors engineering is the application of human factors information to the design of products, tools, machines, systems, tasks, jobs, and environments for safe, comfortable, and effective human use.

  
  •  

    IE-GY 7753 Industrial Safety Engineering


    This course is offered irregularly in Response to industry demand.

  
  •  

    IE-GY 7763 Manufacturing Resources Planning

    3 Credits
    This course studies computerized systems to effectively run a manufacturing business. Also covered is the process of software specification, evaluation, selection and implementation. Topics include Manufacturing Resources Planning (MRP) logic, enterprise resource planning, manufacturing execution systems, inventory management and bill of materials. Several software systems and their features are highlighted.

    Also listed under: MN-GY 7763 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 7853 computer Integrated Manufacturing Systems

    3 Credits
    This course examines the basic concepts of manufacturing complex products with complex processes. It relies heavily on computer and data processing technologies, which are introduced. Also a variety of perspectives are addressed from all aspects relative to products and processes-planning, design, manufacturing and shipping. Students explore techniques for managing and optimizing manufacturing productivity.

    Also listed under: MN-GY 7853 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 7873 Lean Manufacturing

    3 Credits
    This course provides an overview to the basic principles, and theories of lean manufacturing which involves identifying and eliminating non-value-adding activities in design, production, and supply chain management. Students will learn an integrated approach to efficient manufacturing with emphasis on synchronized product, quick changeover, cell design, visual factory, value stream, one-piece flow and understand the metrics used to monitor performance.

    Also listed under: MN-GY 7873 .
    Note: Online version available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 7883 Manufacturing Systems Engineering

    3 Credits
    Topics in this course concentrate on contemporary techniques for product design and manufacture, including financials of the manufacturing firm, quality, reliability, Taguchi methods of product and process design, scaleup and partitioning, production flows, modern manufacturing methods such as JIT/TQC, pull and synchronized manufacturing. Cultural factors are also discussed.

    Also listed under: MN-GY 7883 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 7923 Design for Manufacturability

    3 Credits
    This course introduces concepts and techniques for economical, functionally sound and high-quality product design for manufacture. Emphasis is on designing for easy assembly, manually and with robotics and on the effective use of plastics to reduce manufacturing costs. Managerial and organizational approaches and case studies of successful designs are reviewed.

    Also listed under: MN-GY 7923 .
    Note: Online version available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 7933 Environmental Health and Safety

    3 Credits
    This course presents an overview of environmental, health and safety management, and introduces students to management systems within a manufacturing operation. The course explores motivations and strategies for environmental, health and safety management. Students learn about the mandatory standards understanding the technical and legal rationale for insuring that workers are provided with a safe and healthy workplace. These skills are needed to work effectively in operations, human resources and employee development as well as in industrial relations, since the law provides workers specific safety and health rights.

    Also listed under: MN-GY 7933 .
    Note: Online version available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 7993 Supply Chain Engineering

    3 Credits
    Students in this course gain an understanding of how companies plan, source, make and deliver their products with a global competitive advantage. The course stresses the engineering components in developing an integrated supply chain that covers the entire manufacturing enterprise. It looks at the supply-chain infrastructure and the velocities of different models. The focus is on understanding and detecting the constraints of the infrastructure and the lowest common denominator of the information system used. Students also gain an understanding of logistical networks and the optimizing of the various traffic and location alternatives. Synchronization of supply and demand is examined in detail, looking at variability in both processes with the objective of maximizing throughput and capacity, emphasizing partnering, e-commerce and the bullwhip effect. Finally, the course establishes global performance measurements that compare companies in different industries.

    Also listed under: MN-GY 7993 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 9113 Selected Topics in IE

    3 Credits
    These topics cover areas not covered in other courses. Specific topics vary according to instructor, who may be a visiting professor. Topics and prerequisites announced during the term before classes.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 9123 Selected Topics in IE

    3 Credits
    These topics cover areas not covered in other courses. Specific topics vary according to instructor, who may be a visiting professor. Topics and prerequisites announced during the term before classes.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    IE-GY 9303 Readings in Industrial Engineering I

    3 Credits
    In this course, students individually read selected papers and current literature in specialized area and are guided by a faculty member.

    Prerequisite(s): Approval of adviser, instructor and department head.
  
  •  

    IE-GY 9313 Readings in Industrial Engineering II

    3 Credits
    In this course, students individually read selected papers and current literature in specialized area and are guided by a faculty member.

    Prerequisite(s): Approval of adviser, instructor and department head.

Journalism

  
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    JW-GY 6003 Introduction to Technical Communication

    3 Credits
    This course is an overview of the research, writing, editing and design principles of technical communication. Particular attention is paid to writing for new media. Students learn to gather, organize and present information effectively, according to audience and purpose. Interviewing skills, technical presentation skills and writing for the Web are covered.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    JW-GY 6313 Proposal Writing

    3 Credits

Technology Management and Innovation

  
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    MG-GY 997X MS Thesis in Technology Management

    3 Credits
    Students choose original investigation topics for their theses. While they conduct research and draft their theses, students are required to confer with their advisers and to submit progress reports. A final written report is required at completion. The department may request an oral examination.

    Prerequisite(s): Degree status and approval of supervising professor, MSM Program Director and TM department chair.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 999X PhD Dissertation in Technology Management

    3 Credits
    Students are required to complete 24 credits of doctoral dissertation research.

    Prerequisite(s): Doctoral standing or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 5050 Probability and Managerial Statistics

    0 Credits
    This course starts with the basic concepts of random phenomena and goes on to advanced applications of statistics relevant to managers. Topics include probability theory, discrete and continuous probability variables, sampling, measures of central value and dispersion, hypothesis testing, statistical inference, quality control, analysis of variance, regression, correlation and nonparametrics. The course emphasizes application of concepts.

    Note: No credit is allowed toward any graduate degree program administered by the Department of Technology Management. This course is Pass/Fail only.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6013 Organizational Behavior

    3 Credits
    Introduction to theory, research and practice to better understand human behavior in organizations. Topics include motivation and job satisfaction; decision making; group dynamics; work teams; leadership; communication; power, politics and conflict; organization culture, structure and design; impact of technology; management of work stress; organizational change and development; and career management. Analysis of organizational behavior problems by self assessments, case studies and simulations.

    Note: Distance learning available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6043 Innovation Management in Money, Banking and Financial Markets

    3 Credits
    This is an intensive course that examines the critical management issues of the management of financial institutions. The principal focus of the course is on interplay between the economic and technological developments in the management of modern financial institutions.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6073 Marketing

    3 Credits
    This course covers marketing concepts, processes and institutions. Topics: Positioning, segmentation and product-life cycles. Integration of marketing with new product planning, design and development. Strategies for technology-based products, services and processes. Market research, consumer behavior, advertising, promotion and sales. The special character of governmental and international markets.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6083 Economics

    3 Credits
    The course examines the fundamentals of microeconomics needed by managers. Topics: Demand theory (theory of the consumer) including models of demand, demand elasticities and demand forecasting. Supply theory (theory of the firm) including diminishing returns, profit-maximizing production levels, labor/capital tradeoffs, and long-run vs. short-run issues. Market structures and how they affect optimal production and profit levels. Positive and negative externalities and government intervention including regulation, tariffs and subsidies. Selected applied topics. All topics are presented with examples that emphasize managerial applications.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6093 Accounting and Finance

    3 Credits
    The course covers elements of accounting and finance of importance to managers. Topics: Analysis of principles and practices of the finance function. Financing methods for internal and external ventures and innovations; capital budgeting; R&D portfolio analysis. Contrast of strategic perspectives emphasizing innovation and development with those emphasizing short-term return and investment.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6103 Management Science

    3 Credits
    This course introduces major concepts and methods associated with Management Science, which deals with the application of quantitative modeling and analysis to management problems. Students learn to employ important analytical tools, to determine the assumptions used, and to recognize the limitations of such methods. The course discusses methods of linear and nonlinear programming, queuing, decision analysis, simulations and game theory. The course also introduces modeling with spreadsheets.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6113 Career Management

    3 Credits
    This course integrates theory, research and practice pertaining to careers in organizations, particularly as they change through the life span. It examines careers from the perspectives of both the individual and the organization, including topics such as career-stage models, organizational entry, early career development, mid-career transition, career change and career issues for women. The course develops greater understanding and insight into one’s own career growth and development through the use of career-assessment techniques and standardized instruments for self-evaluation.

    Corequisite(s): MG-GY 6013  or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6123 Human Resource Management

    3 Credits
    This course introduces the broad range of human resource functions and their organizational role. It addresses issues in managing people that have an impact not only on HR professionals but also on line managers. The course is divided into four modules: (1) an overview of HRM from a strategic perspective; (2) the management of human resources, including recruitment and selection, performance management, compensation and benefits, training and career support; (3) human resource challenges, including diversity, procedural justice and ethics, collective bargaining and managing change and innovation; and (4) professional roles in HRM.

    Note: Distance learning available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6131 Labor Relations

    1.5 Credits
    This course introduces labor relations from various perspectives in both union and nonunion organizations. Topics include labor movement history; the current state of the labor movement; labor statistics; labor laws and practices; union organizing; negotiating; economics and labor unions; contract administration; achieving cooperation; grievances; labor and employment arbitration; employee discipline; engineering and professional unions, public sector unions; global aspects; and the future for unions.

    Note: Distance learning available. Not open to students who have completed MG-GY 6133.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6141 Conflict Management

    1.5 Credits
    This course investigates the nature and meaning of conflict in professional and technical organizations and in society. It analyzes the design of conflict avoidance and mitigation programs. Alternative dispute resolution modalities are presented and demonstrated. Students learn strategies to build successful relationships on an ongoing basis, and how to build skills around collaborative conflict resolution.

    Note: Distance learning available. Not open to students who have completed MG-GY 6143.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6153 Leadership Development and Team Building

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on the essential role of multifaceted leadership in diverse organizational settings, especially those utilizing technology. Students learn the nature of leadership and its relationship to team development and organizational effectiveness. The course broadly surveys theory and research on leadership and teams in organizations. Students learn a hands-on approach involving experiential learning and case analyses. Working in teams, students are required to participate actively.

    Corequisite(s): MG-GY 6013  or instructor’s permission.
    Note: Distance learning available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6163 Job and Workplace Design

    3 Credits
    This course examines theory, research and applications of job and workplace design. Presented from an interdisciplinary perspective, the course shows how job design influences attitudes and work behavior within organizations. Students learn diagnostic tools for measuring and evaluating jobs and the psycho-social aspects of the workplace environment, as well as the principles of work redesign. Topics include the influences on work design by innovations in information technology, modern manufacturing, virtual work arrangements and open office systems; design and support of effective work teams; reengineering and total quality management; and privacy and communication in the workplace.

    Corequisite(s): MG-GY 6013  or instructor’s permission.
    Note: Distance learning available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6173 Performance Management and Reward Systems

    3 Credits
    Students learn to create performance-appraisal systems that include theoretical and applied issues. Topics include coaching and feedback; team settings; multi-source feedback and selfratings; executive performance; and improving evaluations. The course examines the role of compensation, benefits and other rewards in attracting, retaining and motivating employees, including technical and professional personnel.

    Corequisite(s): MG-GY 6123  or instructor’s permission.
    Note: Distance learning available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6181 Talent Management Systems

    1.5 Credits
    In this survey course, students gain a knowledge and understanding of the strategies and range of processes, methods and tools that organizations use in effective Talent Management programs. The focus is on developing and managing leadership talent and on Talent Management practices for general management, professional, technical and other positions. Topics include identifying and competing for critical talent pools; alignment and integration of HR practices; recruiting and employment branding; identifying, selecting, developing, reviewing and managing leadership talent; retention and recognition strategies; and career paths and career planning.

    Corequisite(s): MG-GY 6123  or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6191 Coaching in Organizations

    1.5 Credits
    This course focuses on the role of coaching in organizations as part of a talent-management program to develop human resources. Students gain an understanding of the definition, theoretical basis, functions and models of coaching. Topics: How coaching is linked to the adult development lifecycle and the range of contexts in which it is applied. How coaching is used in leadership development as well as performance management, the multicultural aspects of coaching and the access minorities have to coaching. The course provides a familiarity with different coaching tools and instruments as well as how leading organizations use coaching in their talent management programs. Issues related to certification as a coach are addressed.

    Corequisite(s): MG-GY 6013  or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6201 Consulting in Organizations

    1.5 Credits
    This course provides a practical orientation to consulting in organizations within an academic framework. The course prepares students from a variety of disciplines for roles as internal and external consultants by building knowledge and skills to successfully take a client and project from entry through termination and evaluation. Each student is required to take a project from conception to presentation. This project gives students an in-depth understanding of the details and issues that consultants need to address.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6211 Outsourcing: A Human Capital Strategy

    1.5 Credits
    This comprehensive course prepares students from a variety of disciplines with the knowledge and skills necessary for a “make or buy” decision when considering outsourcing human capital. Topics include strategic implications, financial aspects, project management, internal consulting, metrics, legal considerations, development of an effective template RFP (request for proposal), internal communication details, and management of the vendor/provider relationship.

    Corequisite(s): MG-GY 6123  or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6223 Staffing Systems in Organizations

    3 Credits
    This course examines the design and management of successful staffing practices used to build, deploy and retain a quality workforce to achieve organizational effectiveness and individual job satisfaction. Topics include staffing strategy; human-resource planning and workforce diversity; job analysis; recruitment; hiring methods; the reliability and validity of employee-assessment methods; and retention management. The course reviews psychological theories of personnel assessment and integrates legal issues pertaining to staffing practices.

    Corequisite(s): MG-GY 6123  or instructor’s permission.
    Note: Distance learning available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6233 Training Systems in Organizations

    3 Credits
    This overview of numerous forms of training and related learning activities found in the modern workplace includes management development, technical training, career planning and mentoring. The course focuses on training as both an asset to the organization and a necessity for delivering goods or services that customers value. Topics include needs analysis, preparation of employees for jobs, training program design, traditional training methods, computer-based methods, development, implementation and evaluation of training, targeting various groups with special training needs, and management development.

    Note: Distance learning available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6243 Change Management Systems in Organizations

    3 Credits
    This course surveys theory, research and applications related to the process of managing planned change in organizations. Organization development (OD) encompasses a variety of interventions and techniques, including strategic management sessions, team building, organizational climate studies, career development and job enrichment. The course addresses the practical application of group, inter-group and individual changes; planned structural revisions in formal organizations; and the dynamics of organizational change processes. Experiential techniques are emphasized.

    Corequisite(s): MG-GY 6013  or instructor’s permission.
    Note: Distance learning available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6253 Seminar in Organization and Career Change

    3 Credits
    This course explores organizational restructuring, including downsizing, reengineering, delayering, mergers and acquisitions, and focuses on the impact of such change on professional and managerial careers. The course emphasizes current organizational and individual management practices in coping with rapid structural, cultural and technological change in the work environment. Experts from the private and public sectors and from consulting firms address these management practices.

    Corequisite(s): MG-GY 6013  or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6263 Human Resource Information Systems

    3 Credits
    This course introduces the design, selection, implementation, enhancement and operation of human- resource information systems (HRIS), a computer-based tool that allows the efficient entry and updating of employee-related information. The focus is on the design and use of HRIS to facilitate the objectives of HR functions and of the organization. Students participate in a “hands-on” experience with the design of prototype simulations and database programming systems used to solve common HR problems and efficiently manage employee information.

    Corequisite(s): MG-GY 6123  or instructor’s permission.
    Note: Distance learning available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6271 Managing Human Resource Technology in Organizations

    1.5 Credits
    This course examines factors critical to the effective organizational adoption and use of technology in human-resource applications. Topics include project management; HR data and process standardization; organizational governance; the unique security requirements of HR data; metrics; and HR process and technology outsourcing. By understanding these issues and how organizations can address them, students improve their ability to plan and to implement effectively HR process reengineering and HR technology.

    Corequisite(s): MG-GY 6123  or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6283 Web-Based Human Resource Management

    3 Credits
    This course surveys the effective use and application of Internet and Intranet technologies for HR functions. Topics include employee self-service and online recruiting as well as software that handles peer reviews, applicant tracking, performance management, succession planning and benefits administration. Issues include best practices in using Web technology for HRM; creating websites to achieve organizational goals; determining HR information to include in an organization website; impact of Web technology on organization design; evaluating privacy and security issues; and developing a vision and a plan for utilizing Web technology in HRM.

    Corequisite(s): MG-GY 6123  or instructor’s permission.
    Note: Distance learning available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6293 Managing Technical Professionals

    3 Credits
    This course provides a survey of research and practice focusing on the effective management of technical professionals, who have come to represent a significant segment of the labor force. The success of organizations today is largely a result of the knowledge and skills applied by their technical professional employees. The effective management of such a work force has been one of the most critical problems faced by organizations that depend on their contributions. This course closely examines research and case studies that examine various management techniques to improve the utilization, development and motivation of technical professionals for achieving high levels of performance, innovation and creativity.

    Prerequisite(s): MG-GY 6013  or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6303 Operations Management

    3 Credits
    This course covers analytical techniques to design and operate production and service systems, including facility layouts and locations, capacity planning, job sequencing, inventory control and quality control. Topics include introductory linear programming and other formal methods, and case studies and computer usage.

    Also listed under: MN-GY 6303 .

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6313 Organization Theory and Design

    3 Credits
    Introduction to theories of organizations including structure, design and culture. Provides an understanding of how organizations work and their interrelationship with the external environment. Examines the process by which managers select and manage aspects of structure and culture to achieve organizational goals. Topics include characteristics of bureaucracy, adhocracy, sub-optimization, human dynamics and informal systems; influence and control systems; management of technology; and planned change. Examination of organizations through research and case studies.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6321 Global Human Resource Management

    1.5 Credits
    This course is an overview of human-resource management practices in today’s global work environment. Topics include international/ socio-cultural diversity; key characteristics of select countries’ international business behavior; international strategic alliances; identification, recruiting and selection of international personnel; training and development of expatriates and home-country nationals; evaluation and coaching of employees in international organizations; intercultural skills acquisition for the line manager and human resources professional; team-development strategies; and design of practical language learning tools for the HR professional and the line manager.

    Corequisite(s): MG-GY 6123  or instructor’s permission.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6333 Research Methods in Organizational Behavior & Human Capital Systems

    3 Credits
    This course introduces theories and techniques related to research methods applied to organizations. It also provides an understanding of why and how organizational research is carried out. The focus is on analyzing organizational problems and using research as a problem-solving tool. Topics include problem definition, theoretical framework, hypothesis development, research design, experimental designs, measurement, data-collection methods, sampling strategies and preparing research proposals. Students develop a research proposal they apply to a problem of interest.

    Prerequisite(s): MG-GY 5050  or undergraduate statistics course.
    Note: Distance learning available.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6343 Human Capital Engineering & Analytics

    3 Credits
    This course examines and applies the valuation and management of intangible assets in designing and managing post-industrial organizations.  As organizations increasingly rely on technology to produce value, these technological solutions require interactions with other forms of value creation like Human Capital Management, Intellectual Property development and Organization Culture.  The first part of the course focuses on human capital engineering using an interdisciplinary approach, drawing on diverse fields including industrial-organizational psychology, industrial engineering, economics and artificial intelligence to create a holistic view of how work in its various forms creates value.  The second part of the course addresses workforce analytics, providing the student with a knowledge and understanding of current best practices, issues, and decision points in building an effective human capital analytic program.  This part of the course will also focus on data structure and design to enable automation and predictive modeling and will place an emphasis on technology-enabled reporting.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6353 Quality Management

    3 Credits
    Companies have found that focusing on quality and overall customer satisfaction as a primary objective of manufacturing and service operations is a proven competitive weapon. This course examines the concepts and methods to building quality into the management process. Total quality management (TQM) and similar approaches are covered through readings, case studies and examples.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6361 Managing Business Process Reengineering

    1.5 Credits
    Explores the organization effectiveness issues associated with large scale change through Process Reengineering, Toyota Production System (TPS), and Six Sigma programs.   The course develops a thorough understanding of how processes can be designed, measured and maintained to optimize customer value creating performance.  Techniques for defining performance requirements and managing process improvement on a large or small scale will be explored.

    Prerequisite(s): MG 5050 or its equivalent
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6373 Human Capital Big Data, Predictive Analytics, & ROI

    3 Credits
    This course examines theories and applications of human capital, including its definitions, predictive analyses, and determining its value to the business by leveraging big data.  The course will take a systems view and integrate human capital perspectives, concepts, and methods from economics, finance, psychology and business process re-engineering.  Students will learn statistical methods to build predictive models of human capital and the software tools to conduct predictive analytics with big data.  They will learn how to determine the economic and productivity benefits of human capital and human capital interventions (e.g., monetary and non-monetary rewards, job re-design, engagement, etc.) and how to communicate these benefits to senior management and key stakeholders in support of important organizational decisions.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing & MG-GY 5050  Corequisite(s): MG-GY 6123 
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6383 Seminar in Managing HR Analytics & Big Data

    3 Credits
    Rapid changes in HR are resulting in revolutionary transformations of the field.   As HRIS has become ubiquitous and the volume of available information continues to explode, organizations are requiring that HR shift its perspective to become a critical contributor in decision making.  Fluency in the benefits and potential applications of Big Data, Predictive Analytics, and Data Science as applied to Human Capital have become essential for HR practitioners.  These topics are addressed by experts from many of the leading corporations and consulting firms which are at the forefront of HR analytics and Big Data.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6391 Managing Knowledge-Based Enterprises

    1.5 Credits
    This course addresses the organizational and management issues surrounding the emergence of knowledge as a key factor in the competitive advantage of an organization.  The focus of the first part of this course is on knowledge as a manageable asset and how and why organizations use, or, do not use what they know.  New technologies for handling information and knowledge are examined.  Students “create” knowledge by researching knowledge-based organizations as well as via other approaches.  The second part of the course addresses how knowledge management techniques can improve business performance, as well as strengthen management and leadership capabilities.  The application of individual and team based strategies for augmenting human capital performance are examined in the context of knowledge management.   Classic cases of leadership knowledge excellence in applying intelligent human capital acquisition and deployment are provided.

    Note: Not open to students who have completed MG-GY 6393.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6401 Employee Engagement: Theory and Practice

    1.5 Credits
    The course explores the science and practice of employee work engagement from the perspective of the linkage between an engaged workforce and important business outcomes such as higher productivity, employee retention, and customer satisfaction.  Different facets of this emerging construct are examined at the individual and group level with a focus on creating a culture and work environment of engagement that will foster positive attitudes and proactive work behaviors. The meaning of engagement and its relationship to other important psychological constructs such as organizational commitment, job satisfaction, and organizational citizenship behavior are also reviewed.

    Note: Not open to students who have completed MG-GY 6403.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6463 Supply Chain Management

    3 Credits
    This course introduces supply-chain management and covers its qualitative and quantitative aspects. The underlying objective is to: (1) introduce students to the standard business concepts (and associated terminology) involved in the retailing and supply-chain management; (2) develop skills in understanding and analyzing retailing, marketing, logistics, operations, channel management and allied issues and the interactions between them; and (3) examine and discuss the important role played by technology and integration at various points in the supply chain.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6503 Management of Information Technology and Information Systems

    3 Credits
    This course is for managers who need to understand the role and potential contribution of information technologies in organizations. The course focuses on different information technologies and their applications in managing business-critical data, information and knowledge. The course concentrates on the current state of IT in organizations; challenges and strategic use of IT; IT infrastructure and architecture; building, implementing and managing IT applications; and emerging issues such as intelligent systems, business-process re-engineering, knowledge management and group support systems.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6523 Telecommunications Policy

    3 Credits
    This course looks at relationships among the development of the telecommunications industry and national growth and examines the development of telecommunications policy issues as well as policy-making organizations. The course analyzes the major issues that affect the telecommunications industry and commerce and society. The options and opportunities afforded by recent regulatory and policy issues are examined.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6543 Economics for Information Sectors

    3 Credits
    This course in applied competitive strategy draws upon recent experiences associated with the impact of information technology upon diverse industries. Students master a basic understanding of the economic and competitive implications of information technology. Students gain competence in analysis by understanding how the availability of information (through technology or otherwise) affects the basic strategic options available, and how firms and industries are likely to be affected. Students are introduced to the often poorly-structured process of evaluating the economics of potential systems innovations. Students then can participate in strategic-systems planning from a managerial point of view.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6553 Telecommunications Management I

    3 Credits
    This course introduces the fundamentals of modern telecommunications and networking for current and future managers. Topics include basic concepts such as components of data communication, data transmission, Open System Interconnection (OSI), TCP/IP and other models, data link and network layers and local area networks (LANs). The course expands technical knowledge and discusses related managerial issues.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6563 Telecommunications Management II

    3 Credits
    This course explores advanced issues and trends in modern enterprise networking. The course also examines the implications of suchdevelopments in the business environment and the infrastructural needs of organizations and clusters of organizations; reviews ramifications of the TCP/IP revolution leading to commercialization of the Internet/World Wide Web; discusses the network infrastructure required to implement Intranets/ Extranets, electronic commerce and interorganizational business communication and collaboration generally; evaluates emerging technologies (such as electronic payment systems, corporate digital libraries, push technology, multicasting, firewalls and digital signatures); and deals with the implications of Internetworking, such as digital cities, smart buildings, distance learning, telecommuting and teleconferencing.

    Prerequisite(s): MG-GY 6553 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6603 Management of New and Emerging Technologies

    3 Credits
    This course surveys and explores the business implications of selected new and emerging technologies with the potential to change business practices and create new industries. Technologies discussed include new Internet architectures, Wikis, Open Source, security issues, new Web services, social networking and Web 2.0. This course is for the manager who is interested in staying current with, and learning about, new technologies for use in business. No specific engineering background is required. A variety of reference texts, journals, case studies and websites is used.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6643 Management and the Legal System

    3 Credits
    This course discusses the impact of the legal system on corporate strategy, managerial decisions and planning processes. Issues covered include protection of intellectual and technological properties; consumer, contract and commercial laws; employer liability; negligence and risk-management from legal and corporate viewpoints; and constitutional and regulatory aspects of conducting business.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6703 Operations Management for knowledge-Based Enterprises

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on developing a deeper understanding of the role that operations management plays in determining business strategy and in developing competitive advantage. The primary emphasis is on developing and effectively managing operations in knowledge- intensive enterprises. Students discuss the operational design and managerial implications when the emphasis of the operations group is more on knowledge management than on managing production and facilities; managing the effective integration of technology, people and operating systems; understanding the complexities and challenges of operations management; meeting the challenges of developing and managing supply-chain networks; and understanding the critical role of technology in developing an organization’s operational capabilities.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6903 Managerial Decision Making for Information-Intensive Businesses

    3 Credits
    This course introduces managerial decision making and strategies, emphasizing information- intensive businesses and the fastchanging environment in which they compete. This course explores such issues as competing in both the digital and physical spaces, technology as an enabler of change, the role of the professional manager and managing in an increasingly globalized environment.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 6933 Information Technologies, Systems and Management in Organizations

    3 Credits
    This course is for managers who need to understand the role and potential contribution of information technology (IT) within organizations. The focus is on information technology and its business applications. The course concentrates on the current state of IT in organizations; challenges and strategic use of IT; IT infrastructure and architecture; the technical foundation of IT; building and implementing organization information systems; and emerging issues in IT, such as intelligent systems, business process re-engineering, knowledge management and group support systems. Course format is interactive with concept presentation followed by open discussion of real-world applications of IT and business cases.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7173 Enterprise Data Systems

    3 Credits
    The course addresses modern issues of large-scale information and knowledge management through the design, development and implementation of different kinds of database technologies. The course introduces and elaborates data modeling through relational models, SQL applications, database architecture, different types of database-management systems, and data integrity and administration. The course introduces emerging database technologies, such as distributed Internet-based databases, distributed client/server databases, multidimensional databases, groupware, data warehousing, and data mining for decision support.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7183 Strategy for the Modern Enterprise

    3 Credits
    This course provides an overview of strategic decision making for the modern enterprise. It introduces general management perspectives of strategy, competitive strategy, emerging analytical characteristics of strategy, and current innovation and global dimensions of strategy. The course concludes with an integrative approach for strategic decision making. Such an approach is geared to a business environment that is increasingly fast-paced, complex, knowledge-intensive, global and changing continuously.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7203 Intercultural Dimensions of Global Management

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on the critical intercultural dimensions of global management. Topics covered include identifying key culturerelated factors essential for effective global management, communicating across differentcultures, building effective trans-cultural organizations, developing capable cross-culture managers and leveraging cultural diversity.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7503 Electronic Business Management

    3 Credits
    This course investigates the management implications of electronic business. Topics include: (1) accelerated new product development; (2) impact of technology on the value chain: the changing role of intermediaries; (3) electronic commerce: business models and strategies for survival of general lifestyle; (4) implications of “being wired”; and (5) business applications involving collaborative communication, computation and teamwork. The course material is dynamic and Internet-based, reflecting the nature of change in electronic commerce and the IT industry, and the potential implications of electronic business for managers. Students work on a project that requires following developments in the business and IT press, interviewing managers and product developers and simultaneously testing and discussing current developments in the e-commerce market space. Classes use the case method, and a high level of class participation is expected.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7671 Global Retailing and Supply Chain Management

    1.5 Credits
    This course focuses on current theory and practice in global retailing and supply-chain management and the link between globalization and supply-chain management. The course examines the flow and transformation of goods from the raw-material stage to the end user. Another focus is the globalization of retailing, which has triggered a range of supply-chain innovations.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    MG-GY 7693 Managerial Analytics

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on the use of “analytics” —a fast-growing element in modern management— for achieving more effective operations and heightened competitive advantage. The course provides a managerial overview of current deployment of a diverse range of analytics— internally-oriented and externallyoriented. The course also identifies the impact of analytics on a firm’s performance and explores their strengths and weaknesses. The course presents best practices of analytics from a range of industries, including retailing, hospitality, financial services, consulting, healthcare and logistics.

    Pre/Co-requisites: MG-GY 6083  and MG-GY 6093 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
 

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