2016-2018 Undergraduate and Graduate Bulletin (with addenda) 
    
    Mar 31, 2020  
2016-2018 Undergraduate and Graduate Bulletin (with addenda) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


A Brief Guide to Course Descriptions

Each program described in this catalog contains detailed descriptions of the courses offered within the program.

The first line gives the official course number for which students must register and the official course title. The letters indicate the discipline of the course and the first number of the official course numbers indicates the level of the course. The levels are as follows:

  • 1XXX - Freshman Level
  • 2XXX - Sophomore Level
  • 3XXX - Junior Level
  • 4XXX - Senior Level
  • 5XXX to 9XXX - Graduate level

Typically the last number of the course number indicates the number of credits. The breakdown of periods of the course is also listed.

When selecting a course for registration, the section of the course may include the following notations:

  • “LEC” - lecture section
  • “RCT” or “RC” - recitation section
  • “LAB” or “LB” - lab section

Additionally, any other letter or digit listed in the section will further identify the section and being liked to another section of the class with the same letter and/or digit combination. Further information on sections is available from academic advisers during registration periods.

The paragraph description briefly indicates the contents and coverage of the course. A detailed course syllabus may be available by request from the office of the offering department.

“Prerequisites” are courses (or their equivalents) that must be completed before registering for the described course. “Co-requisites” are courses taken concurrently with the described course.

The notation “Also listed…” indicates that the course is also given under the number shown. This means that two or more departments or programs sponsor the described course and that students may register under either number, usually the one representing the student’s major program. Classes are jointly delivered.

 

Mechanical Engineering

  
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    ME-UY 4393 Nuclear Power Plant Systems

    3 Credits
    Principles of operation of pressurized and boiling water reactors.  Overall unit and major components of nuclear plants. Reactor and moderator systems.  Reactor control. Heat transfer systems.  Water/steam systems, turbine, and feedwater pumps.  Special safety systems and their operations under transient conditions.  Protection of the public.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2033  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
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    ME-UY 4623 Biomechanics

    3 Credits
    Introduction to fundamental physiology and pathophysiology concepts. Basic biomechanical concepts applied to different anatomical systems. Fundamentals of the mechanism of control and response activated by mechanical stimuli in the body. Basic principles of locomotion and gait analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 3213  and BMS-UY 1004 
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
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    ME-UY 4633 Biomaterials

    3 Credits
    This course covers the basic properties of biomaterials, biological systems in which biomaterials may be used, different categories of biomaterials, surface modification and sterilization techniques, and cell-biomaterial interactions. Applications include implants and medical devices, and tissue engineered devices for treatment of health conditions and disease.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 2813  and BMS-UY 1004 
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
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    ME-UY 4643 Biofluid Mechanics

    3 Credits
    This course elaborates on the application of fluid mechanics principles to major biological systems, in particular human organ systems. The course will provide an introduction to physiologically relevant fluid flow phenomena, underlying physical mechanisms from an engineering perspective. The focus of the course is on the integration of different fluid mechanics concepts to address relevant problems of the human body systems. Topics covered will include blood rheology, mechanics of circulation arterial wave propagation, oscillatory air and liquid flows and transport of suspended solutes, and how dysregulation of biofluid mechanics relates to disease.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 3313  and BMS-UY 1004 
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
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    ME-UY 4653 Introduction to BioMEMS and Microfluidics

    3 Credits
    This course targets to: (1) introduce fundamental design and microfabrication concepts of BioMEMS, microfluidics and lab-on-chip systems, (2) expose students to the relevant biomedical and biological applications. The course is divided into three main sections: (i) BioMEMS/Microfluidic materials and microfabrication, (ii) BioMEMS sensors and actuators, and (iii) Microfluidic and Lab-on-chip systems.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 2813 , ME-UY 3513 , BMS-UY 1004 
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
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    ME-UY 4713 Manufacturing Systems II

    3 Credits
    This course continues  . It addresses techniques of manufacturing systems that can be applied to business processes in a variety of industries to address bottlenecks, simulation, economic computations, design process and applications. This course builds from the readings and emphasizes project work. The course depends on effective teamwork and focuses on project work and presentations.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 3713 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    ME-UY 4863 Corrosion and Non-Destructive Evaluation of Materials

    3 Credits
    Mechanisms of corrosion and means to prevent corrosion; uniform corrosion, galvanic corrosion, pitting, leaching and corrosion in fresh water; protective coatings, cathodic protection and changes in design and environment to prevent corrosion. Non-destructive testing of materials; Penetrants, Magnetic, Radiography, Eddy Current and Ultrasonic techniques. Materials selection, failure analysis and prevention and design strategies for inspectability.

    Prerequisite(s):  
  
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    ME-UY 4983 Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering

    3 Credits
    The course covers topics of special interest in mechanical engineering to promote exposure to traditional and emerging issues in mechanical engineering not covered in the program’s mainstay courses.
     

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
  
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    ME-UY 4993 BS Thesis in Mechanical Engineering

    3 Credits
    Honors Program students can produce a BS Thesis on a topic of interest to them under faculty advisement. A research project is carried out in traditional and emerging areas of mechanical engineering. The course can be repeated for no more than 6 credits.

    Prerequisite(s): Honors Program status and adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0

Media Studies

  
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    MD-UY 2164/W History and Social Impact of Mass Media Communications

    4 Credits
    This course covers the history and social impact of mass media from Gutenberg’s invention of the printing press until today. The focus is not only on the technological aspects of these media, but also on how their development and later widespread adoption directly and indirectly affected the contemporary socio-cultural environment.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MD-UY 2214/W Cinema 1895-1950

    4 Credits
    This critical survey of cinema, from the Lumière brothers to the immediate post-World War II period, covers genres including short and feature formats in documentary, drama and animation. Works will be examined in detail, with attention to their place in the development of the form and their cultural and social context.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MD-UY 2314 Interactive Narrative

    4 Credits
    This course introduces students to the complex relationship between interactivity and storytelling. Students analyze how an interactive structure creates narrative. Works explored in this course range from nonlinear novels, experimental literature, audio narratives, theater/performance to film as narrative databases and games. The study of the structural properties of narratives that experiment with digression, multiple points of view, disruptions of time, space, and storyline is complemented by theoretical texts about authorship/readership, plot/story, and characteristics of interactive media.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MD-UY 3164/W Critical Studies in Media

    4 Credits
    This course is an introduction to the theoretical discourse used to analyze contemporary media in all of its forms. Students will develop an understanding of the media theories that have had a strong influence on the critical understanding of media over the past 100 years. From Marxism to Postmodernism, students will read original texts, texts that extrapolate from those key works, and general overviews of the field. The texts come from the disciplines of political economy, semiotics, philosophy, media studies, and science fiction. Through class discussions, writing assignments, and creative activities, students’ are expected to demonstrate informed, articulate insights about media and its cultural impact.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements

    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MD-UY 3214/W Cinema 1948-2000

    4 Credits
    This course is a critical survey of cinema from in immediate post-WWII period to 2000. Genres covered will include documentary, comedy, drama and experimental. Works willbe discussed in detail in terms of their place in the development of the form, and in terms of their cultural and social context. Each week, students will view the assigned film before class for details formal analysis and critical context in class. The course will be organized thematically; each week, a selection of alternate films will be offered for additional viewing and essay topics.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements, and a 2000-level humanities and social sciences course.
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MD-UY 4164/W Critical Studies in Digital Art

    4 Credits
    This course will introduce students to the historical, technological, and philosophical milieu that contextualizes and composes the creative use of digital technology. The course will be (1) delving into the history that is the foundation for our current context, (2) contemplating the theoretical implications for technological cultural production, (3) comparing the differences between analogue and digital art that are sometimes subtle and sometimes blatant, and (4) considering the complexity of defining personal expression in light of the technological, social meshwork that is the digital domain. As a result, digital art will be considered in the context of technological art and its history and implications.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MD-UY 4911 Special Topics in Media Studies

    1 Credits
    This advanced seminar looks at contemporary developments in media communications from a global perspective. Students are expected to participate actively through presentations on specific subjects and through vigorous seminar discussion and debate.

    Prerequisite(s): MD-UY 3164/W .
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MD-UY 4912 Special Topics in Media Studies

    2 Credits
    This advanced seminar looks at contemporary developments in media communications from a global perspective. Students are expected to participate actively through presentations on specific subjects and through vigorous seminar discussion and debate.

    Prerequisite(s): MD-UY 3164/W .
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MD-UY 4913 Special Topics in Media Studies

    3 Credits
    This advanced seminar looks at contemporary developments in media communications from a global perspective. Students are expected to participate actively through presentations on specific subjects and through vigorous seminar discussion and debate.

    Prerequisite(s): MD-UY 3164/W .
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MD-UY 4914 Special Topics in Media Studies

    4 Credits
    This advanced seminar looks at contemporary developments in media communications from a global perspective. Students are expected to participate actively through presentations on specific subjects and through vigorous seminar discussion and debate.

    Prerequisite(s): MD-UY 3164/W .
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.


Music

  
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    MU-UY 2124 Western Music Theory

    4 Credits
    This course, an introduction to the fundamentals of Western music theory, focuses on nomenclature, basic notation literacy and fundamentals of harmony, counterpoint and rhythm. Students complete weekly exercises to learn basic skills in composition and musicianship, including dictation, sight-singing, chord analysis and identification, transposition and voice-leading.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MU-UY 2214 Non-Western Music Appreciation

    4 Credits
    This analysis-and-discussion course examines the music of non-Western cultures, from the pre-Colonial period through the present day. The course focuses on performance practices, the relationship between music and the arts, the influence of Western music and technology, and hybridity in contemporary popular music. A topical focus on different cultures will look at the musical traditions of the Middle East, North and Sub-Saharan Africa, India and East and Southeast Asia. Students complete regular listening assignments and perform research on musical styles and traditions.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MU-UY 3134 Music Theory for Songwriters

    4 Credits
    In this introduction to music theory as it applies to songwriting, students compose music and lyrics, building on a practical application of scale, chord and harmony theory. An integral part of the course is an introduction to the craft of poetry as applied to song-lyric writing. Students need free access to a guitar or piano, and some experience on either instrument is preferred. However, neither formal training nor technical proficiency is required.

    Prerequisite(s): Instructor’s permission or MU-UY 2124 .
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MU-UY 3144 Music Since 1900

    4 Credits
    This course examines the development of musical instruments from ancient to modern times, looking at the relationship between technology and society as it expresses itself in musical culture. Topics include the development of the “classis” orchestral instrument families (strings, percussion, woodwind, brass), non-Western instrumental evolution (gamelan, Arabic instruments), the impact of industrialization and the rise of electronic and digital technology. Students will perform research on the relationship between technology and performance practice.

    Prerequisite(s): MU-UY 2124 .
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MU-UY 3214 The Musical Instrument

    4 Credits
    This course, on the art music of the 20th century, focuses on social and historical trends and their impact on developments in compositional practice, instrumental forms and technology. Topics covered include the role of nationalism in music, the European serialist avant-garde, the New York School, the changing nature of the composer in society, the increasing role of technology and the musical dialogue between art and popular music. Students complete regular listening and writing assignments and are required to attend performances outside of class.

    Prerequisite(s): MU-UY 2124 .
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MU-UY 3314 Phonography

    4 Credits
    This course looks critically at the development of recording technology as a catalyst for trends in popular and art music, from the early 20th century to the present. Topics include the rise (and possible fall) of the record industry in the United States, the development of musique concrète and electroacoustic music and the massive impact of recording technology on popular urban, electronic and dance music. Students are encouraged to explore how the artistic practices of sampling, dubbing and remixing have expressed themselves in different genres, scenes and musical styles. The course also looks at current legal, ethical and social issues behind musical copyright and distribution.

    Prerequisite(s): MU-UY 2124 .
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MU-UY 4114 Musical Informatics Studio

    4 Credits
    This studio examines how music and sound actually “work,” from the view of mathematics, physics and information theory. This is a music-theory course in reverse. The class looks at the underlying mathematical principles behind harmony, melody, rhythm (and their “scientific” equivalents of frequency, timbre and duration). Using acoustics, instrument design and basic analog and digital-signal theory, students investigate the properties of music from a scientific, engineering and analytic perspective. Students perform research on topics of interest and present their findings semiweekly.

    Prerequisite(s): MU-UY 3XXX or DM-UY 3113 .
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MU-UY 4211 Special Topics in Music

    1 Credits
    This variable-credit intensive course, combining music theory and practice, may be repeated for credit under different topics.

    Prerequisite(s): MU-UY 3XXX
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MU-UY 4212 Special Topics in Music

    2 Credits
    This variable-credit intensive course, combining music theory and practice, may be repeated for credit under different topics.

    Prerequisite(s): MU-UY 3XXX
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MU-UY 4213 Special Topics in Music

    3 Credits
    This variable-credit intensive course, combining music theory and practice, may be repeated for credit under different topics.

    Prerequisite(s): MU-UY 3XXX
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MU-UY 4214 Special Topics in Music

    4 Credits
    This variable-credit intensive course, combining music theory and practice, may be repeated for credit under different topics.

    Prerequisite(s): MU-UY 3XXX
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    MU-UY 4314 Psychoacoustics

    4 Credits
    This course looks at how people hear and listen to sound and music from a physiological, psychological and sociological frame of reference. The class investigates the basics of human hearing and auditory perception and examines how sonic and musical practices and vocabularies evolve based on how people hear. Students perform basic research (including developing simple experiments) and present their findings semiweekly.

    Prerequisite(s): MU-UY 3XX4.
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.


Philosophy

  
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    PL-UY 2004 Symbolic Logic

    4 Credits
    This course introduces the methods and applications of propositional logic and relational predicate logic. The course looks at the concept of a formal language and covers semantic and proof-theoretic methods of testing arguments for validity. Semantic concepts of tautology, logical equivalence and consistency are compared with their proof-theoretic counterparts, and the notions of soundness and completeness of proof-theoretic methods are introduced.

    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    PL-UY 2134 Philosophy of Science, Technology and Society in China and India

    4 Credits
    This course addresses the fundamental questions of philosophy-What is real? What is good? How do we know?-by consideringthe answers by classical philosophers from India and China. Philosophy in Asia has not been viewed as an abstract academic subject with little or no relevance to daily life. Rather, it has been seen as one of life’s most basic and important enterprises. Philosophy is seen as essential to overcoming suffering and improving the quality of human life. Since Asian philosophy is concerned with practical issues to a greater extent than in the West, the course considers how technology is understood and valued. Attention is given to the history of science in China and India. Since no rigid distinctions exist between philosophy and religion in Asian thought, the place of science and technology in relation to human values is also different. The class examines the Asian philosophical tradition to understand both its historical importance and its relevance to society today.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    PL-UY 2144 Ethics and Technology

    4 Credits
    This course considers how technology shapes and patterns-and is shaped and patterned by-human activities, from a moral point of view. This course focuses on how the technologically textured world changes human life, individually, socially and culturally, for better or worse. The course considers several views of technology and several ethical theories for evaluating technology. The course explains the structures of change and transformation and develops critical forms of thought, so that students can understand, evaluate, appreciate and criticize technological development.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    PL-UY 2204 Philosophy of Technology

    4 Credits
    This survey of prominent approaches to the philosophy of technology asks: What are the philosophical problems presented by technology? How does technology influence ethics, politics and society? What is the relation of philosophy of technology to the traditional branches of philosophy (aesthetics, epistemology, metaphysics)?

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    PL-UY 2254/W Science and Pseudoscience

    4 Credits
    This survey of popular pseudoscientific claims emphasizes issues in the philosophy of science, including demarcation, evidential warrant, scientific progress, science and public policy, and fallacies of reasoning. Topics include UFO sightings and alien abductions, the Nemesis theory of dinosaur extinctions, astrology, creationism, psychic phenomena, theories of intelligence, alternative medicines, global warming and cold fusion. The course emphasizes student input to determine the topics covered.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    PL-UY 2274/W Space and Spacetime

    4 Credits
    What is the nature of space? Is it an independently existing substance, or does it merely consist of the relations between physical objects? Can motion be described simply in terms of the relational properties of objects, or must people always define motion with respect to an absolute motionless substratum? Does the existence of left-handed gloves entail the existence of absolute space? This course considers these and other questions about the nature of space and time as they appear in the writings of philosophers and scientists, including Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Newton, Leibniz, Berkeley, Kant, Poincaré and Einstein.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciencess elective.

  
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    PL-UY 2294 Quantum Mechanics and Information

    4 Credits
    Quantum mechanics is today the best-confirmed theory of particle dynamics. The theory is not only the basis for all digital technologies, but also the theoretical foundation for the best-confirmed theories of matter (quantum field theories). However, since its inception, quantum mechanics has been beset with conceptual problems. No consensus exists on how to interpret it: What would the world be like if it were true? This course develops the mathematical formalism of the theory and explores several proposals about how to interpret it. Other topics include conceptual issues of quantum teleportation, quantum computing and quantum cryptography.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    PL-UY 3004 Metalogic

    4 Credits
    What is the relation between truth and proof? Are there true statements about natural numbers that cannot, in principle, be proven? Can an algorithm be written to decide which statements about numbers are provable and which are not? What is the mathematical basis of the concept of a mechanically implementable algorithm (i.e., a computer program)? What does all of this have to do with logic? This course addresses these and other questions by investigating the properties of propositional and 1st-order logic. Topics include the soundness and completeness of formal systems of propositional and 1st-order logic, the Löwenheim-Skolem and Compactness theorems for 1st-order logic, Gödel’s incompleteness theorems for formal arithmetic, and Turing machines and the notions of computability and undecidability.

    Prerequisite(s): PL-UY 2004  or permission of the instructor.
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    PL-UY 3204 Philosophy of Technology: The Critique of Heidegger

    4 Credits
    This course examines, critically and reflectively, the impact, effects and outcomes of technologies upon human activities. The course studies the nature of the technologically textured ecosystem, or techno-system. The course focuses on how technologies change human life, individually, socially and culturally, and considers the effects of human-technology relations on science, culture, democracy and human values. Emphasis is on the position of Heidegger, his predecessors, followers and critics. The course will examines Heidegger’s unusual interpretation of East Asian philosophy in relation to technology. Heidegger claimed to find merit in Eastern thought, and his critique of Western technology is seen in an Eastern philosophical context.

    Prerequisite(s): One level 2 STS cluster course.
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    PL-UY 3214 The Phenomenon of Life

    4 Credits
    This course offers an existential interpretation of biological facts. The problem of inwardness as examined in modern philosophy is addressed from the standpoint of scientific biology. The course approach is not be limited by the anthropocentric tradition of idealist and existentialist philosophy, nor the materialist standards of natural science. The course explores the great contradictions of human experience-freedom and necessity, autonomy and dependence, self and world, creativity and mortality-through the ascending order of organic powers and functions: metabolism, motility, desiring, sensing and perceiving and on to imagination, art and mind.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements  and One level 2 STS cluster course.
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    PL-UY 3254/W Philosophy of Science

    4 Credits
    The philosophy of science is divided into two subfields: The first studies the nature and methodology of science. The second examines the conceptual and philosophical foundations of particular scientific fields. This course considers topics in the first subfield, including philosophical attempts to describe scientific explanations, laws of nature and the process by which evidence confirms theories in science. The course also considers the nature of scientific theories: what they are, how they change and how they can and should be interpreted.

    Prerequisite(s): One level 2 STS cluster course.
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    PL-UY 3264/W Physics Information and Computation

    4 Credits
    This course investigates the conceptual foundations of contemporary notions of information and computation from the point of view of physics. The course is divided into four parts: Part I considers the relation between entropy and global concepts of information; Part 2 considers the relation between space-time structure and physical concepts of computation; Part 3 considers the relation between quantum and classical information; and Part 4 considers attempts to reconceive physics entirely in information-theoretic terms.

    Prerequisite(s): One level 2 STS cluster course.
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.

  
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    PL-UY 3284/W Relativity and Spacetime

    4 Credits
    The first part of this course develops the physics underlying special relativity and considers such conceptual questions as: Does Special Relativity prohibit faster-than-light travel? Does it allow a traveling astronaut to age less and return home in the distant future? What is the significance of Einstein’s famous equation “E = mc2”? The second part of the course develops the physics underlying general relativity and considers conceptual issues surrounding such current applications as time machines, wormholes and “warp-drive” spacetimes.

    Prerequisite(s): Completion of first year writing requirements
    Note: Satisfies a humanities and social sciences elective.


Physics

  
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    PH-GY 955X Readings in Applied Physics

    1-4 Credits
    These guided studies courses in physics are supervised by faculty member.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Physics advisor approval.
    Note: Course may be repeated for additional credit.

  
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    PH-GY 996X MS Project in Applied Physics

    1-9 Credits
    This project course in applied physics is supervised by a faculty member. A written project proposal and final report must be submitted to the department chair and the advisor, and may be extended to a thesis with the project advisor’s recommendation.

    Prerequisite(s): Advisor Approval
  
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    PH-GY 997X MS Thesis in Applied Physics

    3 Credits
    Independent research project performed under guidance of thesis adviser. Bound thesis volume and oral defense in presence of at least three faculty members. Continuous registration with total 9 credits required.

  
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    PH-GY 999X PhD Dissertation in Applied Physics

    3 Credits
    An original investigation in some branch of physics, which may serve as basis for the MS or PhD degree, is performed under the direction of a member of the department. The number of research credits registered for each semester should realistically reflect the time devoted to research.

    Prerequisite(s): Degree status and graduate advisers and research director’s consent.
  
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    PH-GY 5343 Physical Basis of Nanotechnology

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on the underlying physical basis of nanotechnology. Introduction to nanotechnology, examples of nanoscale systems. Systematics in miniaturization from the mm to the nm scale. Limits to miniaturization. Quantum concepts and elementary Schrodinger theory. Quantum effects in the behavior of chemical matter. Examples of self-assembled nanosystems from nature and from contemporary industrial products.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2033 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 5443 Physical Techniques and Applications of Nanotechnology

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on physical techniques and applications of nanotechnology. Scanning probe microscopes for observation and fabrication. Photolithographic methods of patterning, deposition techniques. Dense memory based on arrays of cantilevers. Magnetic Tunnel Junctions as elements of magnetic disc memory read heads and in Magnetic Random Access Memory. Nanoscale highelectric- field devices. Nanoscale confinement techniques and devices. Applications of carbon nanotubes and semiconductor nanowires. Assembly methods for nanoscale objects.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2033 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 5473 Modern Optics

    3 Credits
    The course covers the physics of optics, using both classical and semi-classical descriptions. Topics include the classical and quantum interactions of light with matter. Diffraction of waves and wave packets by obstacles. Fourier transform optics, holography, Fourier transform spectroscopy. Coherence and quantum aspects of light. Geometrical optics. Matrix optics. Crystal optics. Introduction to electro-optics and nonlinear optics.

    Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 2122  and PH-UY 3234  or equivalents.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 5481 Modern Optics Lab

    1 Credits
    The modern optics laboratory includes experimental investigations into laser modes, velocity of light by time-of-flight, Fourier optics, holography, Fourier transform spectroscopy, crystal optics and nonlinear optics.

    Pre/Co-requisite: PH-GY 5473  or equivalent.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 0 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 5493 Physics of Nanoelectronics

    3 Credits
    This course covers limits to the ongoing miniaturization (Moore’s Law) of the successful silicon-device technology imposed by physical limitations of energy dissipation, quantum tunneling and discrete quantum electron states. Quantum physical concepts and elementary Schrodinger theory. Conductance quantum and magnetic flux quantum. Alternative physical concepts appropriate for devices of size scales of 1 to 10 nanometers, emphasizing role of power dissipation. Tunnel diode, resonant tunnel diode, electron wave transistor; spin valve, tunnel valve, magnetic disk and random access memory; single electron transistor, molecular crossbar latch, quantum cellular automata including molecular and magnetic realizations. Josephson junction and “rapid single flux quantum” computation. Photo- and x-ray lithographic patterning, electron beam patterning, scanning probe microscopes for observation and for fabrication; cantilever array as dense memory, use of carbon nanotubes and of DNA and related biological elements as building blocks and in selfassembly strategies.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2033 .
    Also listed under: ECE-GY 5533 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 5543 Physics of Nanomaterials and Graphene

    3 Credits
    An introductory graduate course for science and engineering students on the basic properties, preparations and applications of Nanomaterials and Graphene. This course will emphasize forms of carbon, including graphitic carbon composites that are a leading structural material in aircraft; and diamond, carbon black, activated charcoal, carbon nanotubes and graphene. Review of the Schrodinger equation as applied to carbon atoms, to diamond, to graphite and to graphene. Trigonal planar bonding as distinguished from tetrahedral bonding. Methods of making graphene including  chemical vapor deposition, exfoliation of graphite. Application of graphene as transparent conductor in solar cells and opto-electronic devices.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2033  or Graduate Standing
    Also listed under: ME-GY 5253 
  
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    PH-GY 5553 Physics of Quantum Computing

    3 Credits
    This course explores limits to the performance of binary computers, traveling salesman and factorization problems, security of encryption. The concept of the quantum computer based on linear superposition of basis states. The information content of the qubit. Algorithmic improvements enabled in the hypothetical quantum computer. Isolated two-level quantum systems, the principle of linear superposition as well established. Coherence as a limit on quantum computer realization. Introduction of concepts underlying the present approaches to realizing qubits (singly and in interaction) based on physical systems. The systems in present consideration are based on light photons in fiber optic systems; electron charges in double well potentials, analogous to the hydrogen molecular ion; nuclear spins manipulated via the electron-nuclear spin interaction, and systems of ions such as Be and Cd which are trapped in linear arrays using methods of ultra-high vacuum, radiofrequency trapping and laser-based cooling and manipulation of atomic states. Summary and comparison of the several approaches.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2033 .
    Also listed under: ECE-GY 5553 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 5663 Physics of Alternative Energy

    3 Credits
    The course examines non-petroleum sources of energy including photovoltaic cells, photocatalytic generators of hydrogen from water, and nuclear fusion reactors. The advanced physics of these emerging technical areas are introduced in this course. Semiconductor junctions, optical absorption in semiconductors, photovoltaic effect. Energy conversion efficiency of the silicon solar cell. Single crystal, polycrystal, and thin film types of solar cells. Excitons in bulk and in confined geometries. Excitons in energy transport within an absorbing structure. Methods of making photocatalytic surfaces and structures for water splitting. Conditions for nuclear fusion. Plasmas and plasma compression. The toroidal chamber with magnetic coils as it appears in recent designs. Nuclear fusion by laser compression (inertial fusion). Small scale exploratory approaches to fusion based on liquid compression and electric field ionization of deuterium gas.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2033 .
    Also listed under: ECE-GY 5663 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 6153 Theoretical Mechanics I

    3 Credits
    Principles of particle and rigid body dynamics. Lagrange’s equations. Small vibrations of coupled systems, normal modes of oscillation.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing, or for undergraduates, PH-UY 2104  or equivalent and applied physics graduate adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 6163 Theoretical Mechanics II

    3 Credits
    Hamiltonian mechanics. Transformation theories of mechanics including the Poisson Bracket and Hamilton-Jacobi formulations. Lagrangian formulation of mechanics of continuous media.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-GY 6153 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 6243 Electromagnetic Theory I

    3 Credits
    Electro- and Magneto-statics. Boundary value problems in three dimensions. Green’s functions and multipole expansions. Polarization and magnetization. Scalar and vector potentials and gauges. Maxwell’s equations.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing, or for undergraduates, PH-UY 3234  or equivalent and applied physics graduate adviser’s approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 6253 Electromagnetic Theory II

    3 Credits
    Electromagnetic waves. Propagation in free space and in dielectric and conducting media. Polarization, dissipation and dispersion. Guided waves and cavities. Special Relativity. Scattering.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-GY 6243 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 6403 Physical Concepts of Polymer Nanocomposites

    3 Credits
    This course presents fundamental aspects of polymer nanocomposites and updates on recent advancements and modern applications. Topics include nanostructured materials; assembly at interfaces; interactions on surfaces; properties of polymer nanocomposites; reliability; nanodevices.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 6513 Introduction to Solid-State Physics I

    3 Credits
    Phenomena and theory of physics of crystalline solids. Topics from thermal, magnetic, electrical and optical properties of metals, insulators and semiconductors.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2344  or equivalent.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 6523 Introduction to Solid-State Physics II

    3 Credits
    Phenomena and theory of physics of crystalline solids. Topics from thermal, magnetic, electrical and optical properties of metals, insulators and semiconductors.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-GY 6513 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 6553 Advanced Quantum Computing

    3 Credits
    Advanced topics in quantum computation are explored.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-GY 5553 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 6633 Statistical Mechanics I

    3 Credits
    Equilibrium distributions. Relationships to laws of thermodynamics. Quantum effects. Maxwell-Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, Bose-Einstein distributions. Applications to bulk properties phenomena using Boltzmann transport equation.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 6643 Statistical Mechanics II

    3 Credits
    Micro-, macro-, and grand-canonical ensembles and principles of classical statistical mechanics. Condensation phenomena. Treatment of fluctuation and transport phenomena. Density matrix formalism of quantum statistical mechanics. Many-body problems.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-GY 6633 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 6673 Quantum Mechanics I

    3 Credits
    Quantum mechanics with applications to atomic systems. The use of Schrodinger’s equations. Angular momentum and spin. Semi-classical theory of field-matter interaction.

    Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 2122  and PH-UY 3234  or equivalents.

    Also listed under: ECE-GY 6553 .

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 6683 Quantum Mechanics II

    3 Credits
    Quantum mechanics with applications to atomic systems. The use of Schrodinger’s equations. Angular momentum and spin. Semi-classical theory of field-matter interaction.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-GY 6673 .
    Also listed under: EL 6563.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 8013 Selected Topics in Advanced Physics

    3 Credits
    Current or advanced topics of particular interest to graduate students are examined. Subject matter is determined each year by students and faculty. The course may be given in more than one section. Consult department office for current offerings.

    Note: this course is not offered every semester.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 8023 Selected Topics in Advanced Physics

    3 Credits
    Current or advanced topics of particular interest to graduate students are examined. Subject matter is determined each year by students and faculty. The course may be given in more than one section. Consult department office for current offerings.

    Note: this course is not offered every semester.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 9531 Graduate Seminar in Physics I

    1.5 Credits
    Students presenting current topics in Physics in a seminar setting to other students and supervising faculty. Topics chosen by the student with guidance from faculty.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-GY 9541 Graduate Seminar in Physics II

    1.5 Credits
    Students presenting current topics in Physics in a seminar setting to other students and supervising faculty. Topics chosen by the student with guidance from faculty.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-UY 1002 Physics: The Genesis of Technology

    2 Credits
    This course introduces contemporary topics in physics, along with readings and discussions of topics with technological implications.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-UY 1013 Mechanics

    3 Credits
    This course is the first of a three-semester lecture sequence in general physics for science and engineering students. Motion of particles and systems of particles. One-dimensional motion. Vectors and two-dimensional motions. Forces and acceleration. Conservation of energy and momentum. Rotations. The free and driven harmonic oscillator. Gravitation. (This class meets four hours per week for lectures and recitation.)

    Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 1024  or an approved equivalent. Corequisite(s): MA-UY 1124  or approved equivalent and  .

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 1
  
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    PH-UY 1213 Motion and Sound

    3 Credits
    First of a two courses introductory sequence in general physics for majors other than science or engineering. (Not an acceptable substitute for PH-UY 1013 .) One-dimensional motions. Vectors and Two-Dimensional Motions. Newton’s Laws of motion. Conservation Laws of Energy and Momentum. Collisions. Rotational motions. Gravity. Statics and Elasticity. Fluids. Oscillations. Mechanical Waves. Superposition and Standing Waves. Sound and Acoustics.

    Corequisite(s): EX-UY 1  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 1
  
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    PH-UY 1223 Electricity and Light

    3 Credits
    Second of two introductory courses in general physics for non science or engineering majors. (Not an acceptable substitute for PH-UY 2023  or PH-UY 2033 ) Electric forces and fields. Electric potential and capacitance. Electric current. Magnetic forces and fields. Faradays law and inductance. Maxwell’s Theory of Electromagnetism. Electromagnetic waves. Light and Color. Geometrical optics. Image Formation. Interference and diffraction.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 1213 . Corequisite(s): EX-UY 1  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 1
  
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    PH-UY 2023 Electricity, Magnetism and Fluids

    3 Credits
    This is the second course of a three-semester lecture sequence in general physics for science and engineering students. Fluids at rest and in motion. An introduction to electric and magnetic forces and fields. Electric charge density. Electric fields from simple charge distributions. Electric potential. Capacitance. Magnetic forces. Magnetic field from a current loop. Inductance. Magnetism in matter. Current and resistance. (This class meets four hours per week for lectures and recitation.)

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 1013  and MA-UY 1124  or an approved equivalent. Corequisite(s): PH-UY 2121  and  .

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 1
  
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    PH-UY 2033 Waves, Optics and Thermodynamics

    3 Credits
    This is the third course of a three-semester lecture sequence in general physics for science and engineering students. Water, sound and electromagnetic waves. Reflection, scattering and absorption. Standing waves and spectra. Superposition, diffraction and beats. Geometrical optics. Introduction to thermodynamics; temperature, heat, and entropy. (This class meets four hours per week for lectures and recitation.)

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2121  and PH-UY 2023 . Corequisite(s): PH-UY 2131  and  .

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 1
  
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    PH-UY 2104 Analytical Mechanics

    4 Credits
    This course covers statics by virtual work and potential energy methods. Stability of equilibrium. Particle dynamics, harmonic oscillator and planetary motion. Rigid body dynamics in two and three dimensions. Lagrangian mechanics. Dynamics of oscillating systems.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2023  Corequisite(s): MA-UY 2034  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-UY 2121 General Physics Laboratory I

    1 Credits
    PH-UY 2121 General Physics Laboratory I (0.5:1:0:1). An introductory level experimental course. Fundamental laboratory experiments in classical mechanics and electrostatics. Stresses basic experimental techniques, error analysis, and written presentation of experiment results.  Experiments require progressively more detailed and sophisticated analysis. This laboratory class meets for three hours on alternate weeks. 

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 1013  and MA-UY 1124  or an approved equivalent. Corequisite(s): PH-UY 2023 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 0 | Weekly Lab Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-UY 2131 General Physics Laboratory II

    1 Credits
    This is the second course of two-semester sequence. Continuation of the introduction to the science of measurement and data analysis. The course accompanies PH-UY 2023 . Experiments cover topics from PH-UY 2023  and PH-UY 2033 . NOTE: This course replaced PH-UY 2031, and will be offered for the first time in Spring 2015.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2121  and PH-UY 2023 . Corequisite(s): PH-UY 2033 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 0 | Weekly Lab Hours: 1.5 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-UY 2344 Introduction to Modern and Solid State Physics

    4 Credits
    Special theory of relativity, Michelson-Morley experiment. Planck’s quantum hypothesis, photoelectric effect, Compton effect, Rutherford scattering, Bohr’s atom, DeBroglie wavelength, electron diffraction, wave function, uncertainty principle, Schrodinger equation. Application to: square well potential, one electron atom. Atomic nucleus, fission and fusion. Energy bands in a periodic lattice, Kronig Penney model, valence, conduction bands, impurity states, electron mobility. Semiconductor properties. Introduction to superconductivity; electron pairs, energy gap, Josephson effect.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2023  and MA-UY 2034   Corequisite(s): PH-UY 2033 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-UY 2813 Astronomy and Astrophysics

    3 Credits


    This course covers historical development of observational astronomy. Traditional and modern observational techniques. Theories of formation and evolution of stars, planets and galaxies. Current developments in astronomy, cosmology and astrophysics.

    Prerequisite(s):   and  .

     

     
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0

  
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    PH-UY 2823 Introduction to Geophysics

    3 Credits
    An introduction to physical geology, familiarizing students with basic geological processes, and emphasizing the interdisciplinary interactions involved.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2033   and PH-UY 2131  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
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    PH-UY 3002 Junior Physics Laboratory

    2 Credits
    An intermediate level laboratory course providing in depth exposure to a selection of classic physics experiments.  Students’ experimental skill set is expanded and data analysis and communication skills developed.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2033   and PH-UY 2131   Corequisite(s): PH-UY 2344   and MA-UY 2224  
  
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    PH-UY 3054 Introduction to Polymer Physics

    4 Credits
    This course introduces polymer physics and its applications in engineering. The course includes polymer assemblies, morphology and motion, mechanical and dielectric response, transitions and relaxations, timetemperature equivalence, yield and fracture, conducting polymers, optics of polymers, oriented structures, nanofibers, composites.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 1013   and CM-UY 1004  or CM-UY 1024   Corequisite(s): PH-UY 2023  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-UY 3103 Fundamentals of Applied Nuclear Physics

    3 Credits
    This course surveys the fundamentals of nuclear physics with application to nuclear engineering. Topics include an introduction to quantum mechanics, nuclear forces and nuclear structure, nuclear stability and reactions, natural and induced radioactivity.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2033 MA-UY 2034  , and CM-UY 1004  or CM-UY 1024 
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-UY 3234 Electricity and Magnetism

    4 Credits
    The course covers properties of the electrostatic, magnetostatic and electromagnetic field in vacuum and in material media. Maxwell’s equations with applications to elementary problems.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2033  and MA-UY 2114  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-UY 3244 Concepts of Nanotechnology

    4 Credits
    This course is the first of an interdisciplinary, two-semester sequence on concepts, techniques and applications of nanotechnology. Introduction to nanotechnology, examples of nanoscale systems. Systematics in miniaturization from the mm to the nm scale. Limits to miniaturization. Quantum concepts and elementary Schrodinger theory. Quantum effects in the behavior of chemical matter. Examples of self-assembled nanosystems from nature and from contemporary industrial products.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2033 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 1
  
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    PH-UY 3424 Light and Lighting

    4 Credits
    The course explores physical concepts in conversion of electric energy into visible light. Nature of light. Visualization of light. Principles of operation and characteristics of modern light sources. Incandescent and tungsten halogen lamps. Fluorescent mercury lamps. Low-pressure sodium lamps. High intensity discharge (HID) lamps. Solid-state light sources. Latest trends in lighting technology.

    Prerequisite(s): CM-UY 1004  and PH-UY 2033 .
    Also listed under:  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-UY 3474 Introduction to Modern Optics

    4 Credits
    This course covers the physics of optics using both classical and semi-classical descriptions. The classical and quantum interactions of light with matter. Diffraction of waves and wave packets by obstacles. Fourier transform optics, holography, Fourier transform spectroscopy. Coherence and quantum aspects of light. Geometrical optics. Matrix optics. Crystal optics. Introduction to electro-optics and nonlinear optics.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2033  and PH-UY 2131  
    Also listed under: ECE-UY 3474  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-UY 3503 Introduction to Radiation Physics and Dosimetry

    3 Credits
    The course examines the basic theory and practice of Radiation and Health Physics. Atomic and nuclear radiation. X-ray and gamma radiation. Interaction of radiation with matter, and the effects on living tissue. Principles of radiation detection, radiation measurement, external and internal dosimetry. Radiation Protection.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 3103 
    Also listed under: ME-UY 4383 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-UY 3513 Nuclear and Radiation Instrumentation and Methods

    3 Credits
    An intermediate level undergraduate course focusing on the theory and practice of nuclear and radiation measurements and instrumentation. Detector properties and priciples, pulse electronics and counting statistics will be discussed in detail in the lecture classes. The experiments will illustrate the lecture topics and compliment the companion theory courses. This course meets five hours per week.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 3103   Corequisite(s): PH-UY 3503  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 4
  
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    PH-UY 3603 Mathematical Physics

    3 Credits
    First course of two-semester lecture sequence in mathematical physics for undergraduate students in physics and engineering. Line, surface and volume integrals, gradient, divergence, and curl. Cylindrical and spherical coordinate systems. Tensors and tensor transformations. The Dirac delta function, and integrals and derivatives of the delta function. Functions of complex variables, analytic functions, and these residue theorem. Fourier series, integrals, and transforms.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2023   and MA-UY 2034   Corequisite(s): PH-UY 2033   and MA-UY 2114  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-UY 3614 Computational Physics

    4 Credits
    An introduction to numerical methods. Solving ordinary differential equations, root finding, Fourier transforms, numerical integration, linear systems. Techniques are applied to projectile motion, oscillatory motion, planetary motion, potentials and fields, waves, and quantum mechanics.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2344 , CS-UY 1133  (or CS-UY 1114 ), and MA-UY 2034  
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 4 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-UY 3703 Mathematical Physics II

    3 Credits
    Second course of two-semester lecture sequence in mathematical physics for undergraduate students in physics and engineering. Review of ordinary differential equations, including first and second order linear equations. Series solutions of differential equations, involving Legendre polynomials, Bessel functions, Hermite functions, and Laguerre functions.  Partial diffential equations, including Laplace’s equation, the diffusion equation, the wave equation, and Poisson’s equation.  Integral transforms, including Laplace and Fourier Transforms, convolution, and Green functions.

    Prerequisite(s):   and   
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-UY 3801 Guided Studies in Physics

    1 Credits
    These guided studies courses in physics are supervised by staff member.

    Prerequisite(s): Applied Physics adviser approval. (Course may be repeated for additional credit.)
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 0 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-UY 3802 Guided Studies in Physics

    2 Credits
    These guided studies courses in physics are supervised by staff member.

    Prerequisite(s): Applied Physics adviser approval. (Course may be repeated for additional credit.)
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 0 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-UY 3803 Guided Studies in Physics

    3 Credits
    These guided studies courses in physics are supervised by staff member.

    Prerequisite(s): Applied Physics adviser approval. (Course may be repeated for additional credit.)
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 0 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
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    PH-UY 3804 Guided Studies in Physics

    4 Credits
    These guided studies courses in physics are supervised by staff member.

    Prerequisite(s): Applied Physics adviser approval. (Course may be repeated for additional credit.)
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 0 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
 

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