2016-2018 Undergraduate and Graduate Bulletin (with addenda) 
    
    Jul 21, 2019  
2016-2018 Undergraduate and Graduate Bulletin (with addenda) [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


A Brief Guide to Course Descriptions

Each program described in this catalog contains detailed descriptions of the courses offered within the program.

The first line gives the official course number for which students must register and the official course title. The letters indicate the discipline of the course and the first number of the official course numbers indicates the level of the course. The levels are as follows:

  • 1XXX - Freshman Level
  • 2XXX - Sophomore Level
  • 3XXX - Junior Level
  • 4XXX - Senior Level
  • 5XXX to 9XXX - Graduate level

Typically the last number of the course number indicates the number of credits. The breakdown of periods of the course is also listed.

When selecting a course for registration, the section of the course may include the following notations:

  • “LEC” - lecture section
  • “RCT” or “RC” - recitation section
  • “LAB” or “LB” - lab section

Additionally, any other letter or digit listed in the section will further identify the section and being liked to another section of the class with the same letter and/or digit combination. Further information on sections is available from academic advisers during registration periods.

The paragraph description briefly indicates the contents and coverage of the course. A detailed course syllabus may be available by request from the office of the offering department.

“Prerequisites” are courses (or their equivalents) that must be completed before registering for the described course. “Co-requisites” are courses taken concurrently with the described course.

The notation “Also listed…” indicates that the course is also given under the number shown. This means that two or more departments or programs sponsor the described course and that students may register under either number, usually the one representing the student’s major program. Classes are jointly delivered.

 

Mechanical Engineering

  
  •  

    ME-GY 999X PhD Dissertation in Mechanical Engineering

    3 Credits
    The doctoral dissertation demonstrates independent study and original contributions in the specialization. Oral examination on subject of dissertation and related topics is required. Also required is a minimum of 24 credits and continuous registration at minimum of 3 credits per semester until the dissertation is completed.

    Prerequisite(s): Passing grade for RE 9990 PhD Qualifying Exam, graduate standing, and dissertation advisor approval
  
  •  

    ME-GY 5103 Biomedical Fluid Dynamics

    3 Credits
    The course focuses on principles of fluid flow and transport in the human body, emphasizing vascular circulation and hemodynamics. Topics include: physics of pulsatile flow, introductory biology and physiology of the circulatory system, blood flow in vessels, microcirculation, blood rheology, fluid dynamics of vasculature under physiological and pathological conditions, mass transport to vessel walls, mechanics of blood cells, cellular mechanotransduction and biochemical signaling and microfluidics in biomedical devices.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 5243 Composite Materials

    3 Credits
    This course introduces modern polymeric, metallic and ceramic composite materials, fabrication techniques, mechanical property characterization. Topics: Introduction to matrix and reinforcement materials, material selection and composite design criteria. Mechanics based analysis of continuous fiber reinforced unidirectional plies and woven fabrics. Applications of advanced composites in car, aircraft, construction and sports industries.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 5253 Physics of Nanomaterials and Graphene

    3 Credits
    An introductory graduate course for science and engineering students on the basic properties, preparations and applications of Nanomaterials and Graphene. This course will emphasize forms of carbon, including graphitic carbon composites that are a leading structural material in aircraft; and diamond, carbon black, activated charcoal, carbon nanotubes and graphene. Review of the Schrodinger equation as applied to carbon atoms, to diamond, to graphite and to graphene. Trigonal planar bonding as distinguished from tetrahedral bonding. Methods of making graphene including  chemical vapor deposition, exfoliation of graphite. Application of graphene as transparent conductor in solar cells and opto-electronic devices.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2033  or Graduate Standing
    Also listed under: PH-GY 5543 
  
  •  

    ME-GY 5443 Vibrations

    3 Credits
    The course looks at the dynamics of one-, twoand multi-degree of freedom systems with and without damping. Topics: Vibrations of distributed parameter systems: bars, beams and plates. Numerical methods. Introduction to nonlinear oscillations.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 5653 Microelectromechanical Systems

    3 Credits
    The course covers materials for MEMS, fundamentals of solid mechanics, electrostatics and electromagnetics. Topics: Electromechanical modeling and design of micromachined sensors and actuators. Microscale physics of microsystems. Overview of MEMS applications. Packaging and testing.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 5813 Research & Design Methodology & Communication

    3 Credits
    This course is targeted to students at the undergraduate senior level or graduate (Master of Science) level, who wish to enhance their skills in the methodology of research and design, and in communicating their results and ideas in multi-disciplinary settings.  The course will present a unified approach to research, design, and communication; and show that there is a continuum from fundamental research to the art of technical promotion.  Written assignments, individual presentations, role play, and class discussions will be used as vehicles for accomplishing the educational goals of this course.

    Prerequisite(s): Senior (with 3.4 GPA) or Graduate standing
  
  •  

    ME-GY 5913 Mechatronics

    3 Credits
    The course introduces theoretical and applied mechatronics, design and operation of mechatronics systems; mechanical, electrical, electronic and optoelectronic components; sensors and actuators, including signal conditioning and power electronics; microcontrollers, fundamentals, programming and interfacing; and feedback control. The course includes structured and term projects in designing and developing f prototype integrated mechatronic systems.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6003 Applied Mathematics in Mechanical Engineering

    3 Credits
    Vector and tensor calculus. Ordinary differential equations. Laplace and Fourier Transforms. Sturm-Liouville problems. Partial differential equations. Applications to structural analysis, fluid mechanics and dynamical systems.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6013 Thermodynamics

    3 Credits
    The course covers availability functions, general thermodynamic relations, equations of state, general thermodynamic equilibrium criteria, power production, thermodynamics of reacting systems, energy of formation, chemical equilibrium, applications in combustion systems.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6043 Thermal Engineering Fundamentals

    3 Credits
    Presentation of basic scientific and engineering principles that all energy systems must satisfy, including thermodynamic, fluid mechanic and heat transfer principles that constrain or facilitate energy systems.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing or Advisor approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6153 Thermodynamics of HVAC Systems

    3 Credits
    Principles of thermodynamics. Description of HVAC systems. Vapor compression and adsorption cycles. Heat pump cycles. Geothermal systems. Solar heating and cooling systems. Phychometric analysis for design and off-design conditions. Indoor environmental quality anaylsis. Green and sustainable systems.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 3333  or advisor approval
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6163 Fluid Mechanics for HVAC Systems

    3 Credits
    Fundamentals of fluid mechanics. Centrifugal pumps and system-pump characteristics. Piping systems fundamentals and design.Jets and air diffusers. Fans, fan performance, installation and testing. Duct sizing and design. Design of sprinkler systems.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 3313  or advisor approval.
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6173 Heat Transfer for HVAC Systems

    3 Credits
    Fundamentals of heat transfer. Solar radiation fundamentals. Heat transmission in buildings and space heat load calculations. Space cooling load calculations. Energy calculations; degree by day procedure, bin methods and building simulation methods. Energy modeling and conformance with NYS Code. Extended surface heat exchangers. LEED Score sheet and design for green buildings.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 4313  or advisor approval.
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6183 Design of HVAC Systems

    3 Credits
    This course involves the dynamic and sustainable design process to perform a complete design of HVAC systems for a commercial or residential building using state of the art software and processes. Design schematic phase. Design development phase. Construction documents phase. Students work on a specific project, designing a system through all stages.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 4313  or advisor approval.
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6213 Introduction to Solid Mechanics

    3 Credits
    The course explores fundamentals of kinematics of solid bodies; displacement and strain measures, introduction to statics of solid bodies, stress tensor, equilibrium equations. Topics include analysis of columns, beams and beams on elastic foundations.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6223 Advanced Mechanics of Materials

    3 Credits
    The course discusses two-dimensional stress and strain analysis, applications of energy methods, Reyleighitz method. Topics: Applications of energy methods to beams, frames, laminates and sandwich structures. Torsion of prismatic bars, open and closed thin-walled cylinders, unsymmetric bending and shear center, curved bars.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6213  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6243 Atomistic and Electronic Simulation of Materials

    3 Credits
    Simulation is an important tool, which complements experimental characteristics of materials by providing fundamental details at electronic, atomic, mesoscale, and macroscale resolution. This fundamental understanding then guides the experimental approach to modify the properties of the materials with a rational approach rather than stochastic approach. This course primarily focuses on predicting structure-property correlation of various materials using electronic and atomic level simulations. The course will cover density functional theory (DFT), molecular dynamic (MD) and monte carlo (MC) simulations with hands on projects using available software.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6253 Mechanics of Nanomaterials

    3 Credits
    The course introduces nanosized and nanoscale materials: nanoparticles, nanotubes, nanowires, nanorods. Topics: Classical molecular dynamics, lattice mechanics, methods of thermodynamics and statistical mechanics, introduction to multiple scale modeling and introduction to bridging scale. Characterization techniques for nanomaterials. Applications in nanosystems such as nanocars, nanobots and nanoelectronics.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6263 Mechanical Behavior of Materials

    3 Credits
    Analyze the effect of applied external load on the deformation of a material is critical for engineering design and the performance of materials during application. Response of the a material to the applied load at the atomic and microstructural level is analyzed. This course focuses on elastic vs. plastic deformation, defects and dislocations, various strengthening mechanisms, creep and fatigue response in materials.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6323 Microscopy & Microanalysis

    3 Credits
    Foundations of materials characterization. theory of scanning electron microscopy. Practical aspects, data collection, and imaging using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM). Theory of X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Quantitative and qualitative phase analysis of materials using XRD. X-ray emission and chemical analysis using EDS. Sample preparation for SEM, EDS and XRD observations. Data analysis, image/data processing and data interpretation of electron microscopy and XRD spectra.

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: Graduate standing
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6413 Additive Manufacturing Fundamentals

    3 Credits
    Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing, is the fastest growing industrial field. Numerous examples are available where components manufactured by AM methods are now put into service. This course will focus on fundamentals of AM techniques and will take a broad view on the new possibilities enabled by the new manufacturing methods.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6423 Additive Manufacturing of Metallic Materials

    3 Credits
    Additive manufacturing (AM), also known as 3D printing, is the fastest growing industrial field. Numerous examples are available where components manufactured by AM methods are now put into service. This course will focus on one of the largest share of materials used in current industrial scale 3D printing, i.e., metals. The topics will cover the basic characteristics of metals and alloys through discussion of powder characterization, phase diagram, and microstructure to relate them to additive manufacturing process and properties of the manufactured parts. The course will also discuss the applications of metal 3D printed parts and future opportunities.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6433 CAD for Additive Manufacturing

    3 Credits
    The course will cover the topics of CAD solid modeling that are relevant to additive manufacturing (3D printing). SolidWorks software will be used in the class. The students will be able to understand how CAD models developed for additive manufacturing may differ from the models developed for visualization. Some of the developed models will be printed to examine the quality of the product and observe the effects of various concepts discussed in the class. Prior knowledge of any CAD software will be beneficial for the course.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6453 Security in Additive Manufacturing

    3 Credits
    The course will cover the topics of security strategies in additive manufacturing (AM). A completely digital process chain is exposed to significant cybersecurity risks from internal or external malicious players for sabotage and intellectual property theft. Also, product counterfeiting is possible by reverse engineering. Such concerns require new security strategies that are unique to AM process chain. The course will cover threat models, security strategies and industrial scenarios related to security in AM.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6513 Advanced Dynamics

    3 Credits
    The course covers kinematics and dynamics of a particle in space. Topics: Systems of particles. Two-body central force problem. Kinematics and dynamics of rigid bodies. Euler’s equations. Euleragrange equations with holonomic and nonholonomic constraints. Stability analysis. Introduction to calculus of variations. Hamilton’s principle. Hamilton’s equations.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6603 Digital Control Systems

    3 Credits
    The course introduces digital systems, signal conversion techniques, z-transform and inverse z-transform, transfer function and block diagrams, state-variable techniques, controllability, observability, stability and control design techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6613 Sensor Based Robotics

    3 Credits
    Topics in this course include robot mechanisms, robot arm kinematics (direct and inverse kinematics), robot arm dynamics (Euler Lagrange, Newton-Euler and Hamiltonian Formulations), six degree-of-freedom rigid body kinematics and dynamics, quaternion, nonholonomic systems, trajectory planning, various sensors and actuators for robotic applications, end-effector mechanisms, force and moment analysis and introduction to control of robotic manipulators.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate status or adviser approval.
    Also listed under: ECE-GY 5223 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6623 Introduction to Robot Mechanics

    3 Credits
    Robot components and types, and their mathematical modeling. Spatial description of position and orientation.  Types and modeling of robotic joints. Differential rotation and translations.  Forward and inverse kinematics  Homogeneous transformation.  Denavit-Hartenberg kinematic convention.  Jacobian and mapping.  Manipulator statics and dynamics.  Robot mechanism design.  Power train and transmission.  Motion planning and control.  Kinematic/kinetic redundancy and optimaization.  Locomotion and balancing.  Biomimetics and humanoids.

    Prerequisite(s): Prerequisites: ME 3223 and ME 3413, or instructor’s consent.
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6703 Linear Control Theory and Design I

    3 Credits
    The course covers modeling of mechanical systems (e.g., mechatronic, vibrational, robotic and smart systems) in state-space. Topics: Description and analysis of linear mechanical systems, transform and transition matrix methods and properties such as stability, controllability/ stabilizability, observability/ detectability.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate standing or advisor approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6713 Linear Control Theory and Design II

    3 Credits
    The course considers fundamentals of system realizations and random processes. Topics: Performance objectives for mechanical systems (e.g., mechatronic, vibrational, robotic and smart systems). Optimal design of state feedback controllers, observers and output feedback controllers for mechanical systems.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6813 Energy Conversion Systems

    3 Credits
    This course provides description and analysis of current and future energy systems including fuel sources, energy harvesting, energy delivery to the point of conversion, energy conversion to heat or electricity, distribution to end users, basic economics of power plant and environmental impact. Security, reliability and life cycle cost considerations are reviewed and analyzed for impact on selecting the optimum energy systems.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6823 Energy Policy, Regulations, and Incentives

    3 Credits
    This course focuses on impact of local, state and national policy on energy choices. Regulatory limitations and incentives influencing energy options and economics. Quantitative trade off analyses of various technically feasible options when policies, regulations and incentives are considered. Environmental impact, positive as well as negative, of energy systems are analyzed. Costs of mitigating negative environmental impact are reviewed and their impact on the choice of a system is analyzed through case studies presented in term papers.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6833 Energy Project Financing

    3 Credits
    Analysis of current and projected fuel costs, capital costs, maintenance costs, operating and environmental costs, and infrastructure costs of various competing energy systems. A term project providing an in-depth analysis of one candidate system is required. Student teams present the results of their work advocating for their system. A panel of judges will decide which group makes the best case for its system.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6823  
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6843 Advanced Manufacturing of Biomedical Devices

    3 Credits
    This course aims to provide the essential knowledge in the biomedical product development (e.g. material properties, fabrication processes and design techniques for different applications) in order to provide ways to speed up the product development cycle. This course is multidisciplinary and covers the principles in its mechanical, chemical, biological, and physiological aspects. Students can learn the techniques for applying this acquired knowledge to  particular applications in which they are interested.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 2813 Introduction to Materials Science  and ME-UY 3213 Mechanics of Materials  or equivalent.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6913 Introduction to Robot Mechanics

    3 Credits
    Robot components and types, and their mathematical modeling. Spatial description of position and orientation. Types and modeling of robotic joints. Differential rotation and translations. Forward and inverse kinematics. Homogeneous transformation. Denavit-Hartenberg kinematic convention. Jacobian and mapping. Manipulator statics and dynamics. Robot mechanism design. Power train and transmission. Motion planning and control. Kinematic/kinetic redundancy and optimization. Locomotion and balancing. Biomimetics and humanoids. 

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 3223   and ME-UY 3413  or instructor’s consent (for undergraduates) or Graduate Standing
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6923 Simulation Tools for Robotics

    3 Credits
    The student who completes this course will gain an advanced understanding of the principles underlying simulation of dynamical systems, with particular reference to mechatronics and robotic systems. He/she will be able to use modern tools for simulation of mechatronics and robotic systems. Moreover, he/she will be able to design and implement control algorithms and assess their performance on the simulated systems.

    Prerequisite(s): Graduate Standing
  
  •  

    ME-GY 6933 Advanced Mechatronics

    3 Credits
    Introduction to, applications of, and hands-on experience with microcontrollers and single-board computers for embedded system applications. Specifically, gain familiarity with the fundamentals, anatomy, functionality, programming, interfacing, and protocols for the Arduino microcontroller, multi-core Propeller microcontroller, and single-board computer Raspberry Pi. Includes mini-projects and term projects in the design and development of proto-type integrated mechatronic systems.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 5643  
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7003 Finite Element Methods

    3 Credits
    The course explores derivation of element stiffness matrices for spring, bar and beam elements. Topics: Finite element formulation to determine many unknowns such as displacements, forces and reactions. Application to trusses, frames and two-dimensional problems in plane stress and plane strain under static loading conditions. Applications in thermal, heat transfer and fluid mechanics. Interpreting the results, convergence of solution and effect of meshing and symmetry conditions. Introduction to modern meshless techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7063 Convective Heat Transfer

    3 Credits
    The course examines developments and applications of laminar hydrodynamic and thermal boundary layer equations for fluid media. Topics: Mechanics of turbulence; formulation and analysis of turbulent hydrodynamics and thermal applications; natural convection and film evaporation and condensation.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6043  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7073 Conductive Heat Transfer

    3 Credits
    This course covers theoretical development of transient and steady-state temperature distributions in finite and infinite solids. Topics: Pertinent mathematical techniques introduced as required. Solids undergoing phase change and two dimensional fields.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6003  and ME-GY 6043  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7083 Radiative Heat Transfer

    3 Credits
    This course covers fundamentals of radiative mechanisms of energy transfer. Topics: Definitions of basic qualities. Equations of transfer, radiative heat flux vector and conservation equations. Properties of surfaces and participating media. Applications to engineering systems.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6003  and ME-GY 6043  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7113 Viscous Flow and Boundary Layers

    3 Credits
    The course introduces molecular and macroscopic transport. Topics: Reynold’s transport theorem.Concepts of stress and strain and derivation of the Navier-Stokes equations. Similarity principle. Exact solutions to the Navier-Stokes equations. Low Reynolds number flows. Boundary layer theory. Momentum integral equation. Introduction to turbulence.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6003  and ME-GY 6043  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7123 Turbulent Flow

    3 Credits
    The course covers nature and origin of turbulence. Topics: Instability and transition, Taylor and Grtler vortices. Vorticity dynamics, homogeneous and isotropic turbulence. Reynolds decomposition, turbulent stress tensor and Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes equations. Computational modeling of turbulence. Analysis of turbulent boundary layers. Turbulent heat and mass transfer, measurement of turbulence.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6043  and ME-GY 7113  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7133 Compressible Flow

    3 Credits
    The course examines fundamentals of compressible fluid flow, including subsonic, transonic, supersonic and hypersonic flows over two-dimensional and axisymmetric bodies. Topics: One-dimensional flows with friction and heat addition. Shock-wave development in both two-dimensional steady and onedimensional unsteady flow systems, including flow in shock tubes. Quasi-one-dimensional compressible flow, including flows in inlets, nozzles and diffusers. Introduction to numerical solution of compressible fluid flow.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6043  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7153 Computational Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer

    3 Credits
    The course centers on engineering solution of thermo-fluid problems by finite-difference methods, error and stability analyses, numerical dispersion and damping, matrix inversion methods, solution of model equations: wave, heat, Laplace, viscous and inviscid Burger’s equations. Also covered are implicit and explicit procedures, SOR, ADI, hopscotch and direct solvers for evaluating linear and nonlinear diffusion and convection problems.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6003  and ME-GY 6043  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7163 Experimental Methods in Thermal-Fluid Sciences

    3 Credits
    The course discusses basic measurement techniques in thermal and flow sciences and a survey of the modern developments in measurement technology, including optical methods. Topics: Planning of experimental programs, calibration, measurement uncertainty, noise, generalized performance characteristics, various devices for measuring mass and volume-flow rate, velocity, pressure, temperature, density and heat flux, computerized data acquisition and statistical analysis.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6043  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7213 Elasticity I

    3 Credits
    The course looks at stress and strain tensors, generalized Hooke’s law. Topics: Formulation of elasticity problems. Plane stress and plane strain concepts; solution by complex variables; stress concentrations. Rotating Discs and cylinders of uniform thickness and variable thickness. Deformation symmetrical about an axis.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6213  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7243 Advanced Composite Materials

    3 Credits
    The course covers mechanics based analysis of fibrous (continuous and discontinuous) and particulate composites, generalized Hooke’s law for anisotropic and orthotropic materials. Topics: Stress strain transformations and failure criterion for anisotropic materials. Analysis of composite beams in tension, flexure and torsion. Analysis of composite shells and grid-stiffened structures.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6213  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7323 Failure Mechanics

    3 Credits
    The course introduces fracture mechanics. Topics: Linear elastic, elastic-plastic and fully plastic fracture mechanics modeling and design. Fatigue and design against fatigue failures. Standard fracture mechanics testing procedures and related material properties. Micromechanics of fracture. Dynamic fracture. Continuum damage mechanics.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6213  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7333 Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE)

    3 Credits
    The course introduces various NDE techniques used in engineering applications, x-ray radiography, ultrasonic imaging, acoustic emission, optical interferometry, magnetic resonance imaging. Also introduced are embedded optical and electromechanical sensors for continuous health monitoring and defect detection.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6003  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7353 Fracture Mechanics

    3 Credits
    The course introduces fracture mechanics. Topics: Linear elastic, elastic-plastic and fully plastic fracture mechanics modeling and design. Fatigue and design against fatigue failures. Standard fracture mechanics testing procedures and related material properties. Micromechanics of fracture. Dynamic fracture. Continuum damage mechanics.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6213  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7443 Advanced Vibrations

    3 Credits
    This course reviews analytical dynamics and vibrations of lumped parameter systems. Topics: Vibrations of distributed parameter systems. Approximate solution methods. Introduction to nonlinear vibrations and analysis tools. Advanced topics.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 5443  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7613 Nonlinear Systems: Analysis and Control

    3 Credits
    The course introduces nonlinear phenomenon, behavior and analysis of second-order nonlinear systems, fundamental properties of solutions of nonlinear ordinary differential equations, Lyapunov stability theory, absolute stability theory, describing functions, dissipativity, advanced topics.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6003  and ME-GY 6713  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7623 Cooperative Control

    3 Credits
    The course examines fundamentals of set theory, metric spaces, linear spaces, matrix theory and differential equations. Topics: Lyapunov stability. Algebraic graph theory. Consensus theory. Linear switched systems. Stochastic convergence. Averaging methods. Synchronization problems. Applications to multivehicle robotic teams, epidemic spreading and opinion dynamics.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6003  and ME-GY 6703  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7703 Optimal Robust Control

    3 Credits
    The course looks at mathematical preliminaries, matrix theory fundamentals, linear system properties, stability theory, constrained optimization and performance characterization: deterministic/stochastic formulations, Lagrange multiplier versus linear-matrix-inequality formulation of linear quadratic regulation (LQR), state estimation and dynamic output feedback control problems, static output feedback, regulation versus tracking problems, robustness properties of LQR, on lack of robustness of LQG controllers, loop-transfer recovery, small-gain theorem, introduction to H-infinity and multi-objective robust control.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6703  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7863 Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering

    3 Credits
    These course numbers are reserved for special topics offered periodically by the Mechanical Engineering Program and are open to first year graduate students. When offered, the subject matter is indicated as part of the title after the words “Special Topics,” and the complete title appears on the student’s transcript.

    Prerequisite(s): tailored to the offering, and adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7873 Special Topics

    3 Credits
    These course numbers are reserved for special topics offered periodically by the Mechanical Engineering Program and are open to first-year graduate students. When offered, the subject matter is indicated as part of the title after the words “Special Topics,” and the complete title appears on the student’s transcript.

    Prerequisite(s): tailored to the offering. Adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7913 Robots for Disability

    3 Credits
    This course will introduce personal, societal, and technological challenges related to physical disability, cognitive disability, and senior living. After an introduction to these challenges, students will learn about current state of art mechatronics and robotics solutions to handle these problems. Finally, they will apply their mechatronics and robotics learning to produce novel robotics solutions to address a specific problem related to a disability.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 5643   or permission of instructor
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7923 Robotic Gait and Manipulation

    3 Credits
    Review of fundamental robot kinematics, dynamics, and control. Types of robotic manipulation. Design and control of robotic manipulators. Robotic hand and arm. Robotic manipulation modeling, simulation, and experiments. Gait types of legged systems. Biped and quadruped systems. Human walking and running, and passive dynamics. Design and control of biped walking robots. Robotic gait modeling, simulation, and experiments. Focus on hands-on experience in design, fabrication, and control of simple mechanisms.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6913  
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7933 Fundamentals of Robot Mobility

    3 Credits
    This course will consider wheeled mobile robots. It will cover forward and inverse kinematics, mechanisms, sensors, actuators, and controllers for wheeled mobile robots. In addition, it will consider various control architectures for such robots. Topics related to navigation, localization, and mapping as applicable to wheeled mobile robots will also be covered. The course will address various applications of such robots in real-world. Finally alternative mechanisms for robot mobility will be considered (e.g., legged locomotion).

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 5643   or permission of instructor
  
  •  

    ME-GY 7943 Networked Robotics Systems, Cooperative Control and Swarming

    3 Credits
    The student who completes this course will gain an advanced understanding of the analysis and control of networked dynamical systems, with a specific accent on networked robotic systems. He/she will be able to study the properties of networked robotic systems through the analysis of the intertwining properties of the network structure and of the individual dynamics of the single robot. Moreover, he/she will be able to understand and design algorithms for distributed control of teams of mobile agents and robots.

  
  •  

    ME-GY 7953 Introduction to Smart Materials and Structures

    3 Credits
    This course presents the fundamentals of fabrication, modeling, analysis, and design of smart materials and structures. Students will be exposed to the state of the art of smart materials and systems, spanning piezoelectrics, shape memory alloys, electroactive polymers, mechanochromic materials, and fiber optics. They will explore the application of such materials in structural systems from the aeronautic, automotive, biomedical, and nautical industry. They will gain familiarity with multiphysics phenomena taking place within smart materials. Such knowledge will, in turn, inform the use of commercial software to simulate smart materials and structures for application in sensing and actuation.

  
  •  

    ME-GY 7963 Design and Simulation of Microelectromechanical Systems

    3 Credits
    This course presents the fundamentals of fabrication, modeling, analysis, and design of micro/nano sensors and actuators. Students will be exposed to the state of the art of micro/nano fabrication. They will gain familiarity with multiphysics phenomena at the micro/nano scale toward an improved understanding of fundamental sensing and actuation principles. Such knowledge will, in turn, inform the use of commercial software to design and simulate micro/nano devices for real world application.

  
  •  

    ME-GY 8033 Combustion

    3 Credits
    The course covers chemical characteristics of flames. Topics: Heat of formation and of reaction; phase and reaction equilibrium and adiabatic flame temperature; and special concentration in stationary and flowing reacting systems. Chemical kinetics of homogeneous and heterogeneous reacting systems. Branching chain reactions and explosion limits. Diffusion and remixed combustion systems.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 6043  and ME-GY 6013  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 8043 Theory of Propulsion

    3 Credits
    This course looks at principles of high-speed propulsion based on chemical energy sources. Topics: Air- breathing engines and their components: ramjet, scramjet, turbojet and turbofan, combustion thermodynamics, flows with chemical reactions, thermo-chemistry of solid and liquid rocket engines. Engineering parameters in engine design.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 7133 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 8213 Elasticity II

    3 Credits
    This class continues studies in elasticity problems. Topics: Three dimensional problems; St. Venant problems, extension, flexure, tension. Energy principles and variational methods; approximation techniques.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 7213  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 8273 Mechanics of Cellular Materials

    3 Credits
    The course looks at structure of cellular composites and natural cellular materials, including single phase open and closed cell foams and two-phase closed cell foams. Topics: Mechanics of honeycombs and foams, mechanics of wood and bones, effect of density, cell size and cell periodicity, introduction to homogenization techniques for cellular composites.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-GY 7213  or adviser approval.
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-GY 9013 Guided Readings I

    3 Credits
    These readings are open to qualified graduate students interested in special advanced topics. Directed study includes analytical work and/or laboratory investigations.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser and instructor approval.
  
  •  

    ME-GY 9023 Guided Readings II

    3 Credits
    These readings are open to qualified graduate students interested in special advanced topics. Directed study includes analytical work and/or laboratory investigations.

  
  •  

    ME-GY 9033 Guided Readings III

    3 Credits
    These readings are open to qualified graduate students interested in special advanced topics. Directed study includes analytical work and/or laboratory investigations.

  
  •  

    ME-GY 9043 Guided Readings IV

    3 Credits
    These readings are open to qualified graduate students interested in special advanced topics. Directed study includes analytical work and/or laboratory investigations.

  
  •  

    ME-UY 498x Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering

    variable credit Credits
    The course covers topics of special interest in mechanical engineering to promote exposure to traditional and emerging issues in mechanical engineering not covered in the program’s mainstay courses.

    Prerequisite(s): Adviser’s approval.
  
  •  

    ME-UY 1012 Introduction to Mechanical Engineering

    2 Credits
    This course introduces students to the range of mechanical engineering and emphasizes the basic principles and devices for storing and using energy, directing motion and satisfying needs. Case studies look at design issues and related ethical and professional practice issues. Emphasis is on a mindset of exploration. Engineering standards and standard parts. Teams work on and present two design challenges.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 2112 Computer Aided Design

    2 Credits
    The course covers sketching, drawing and computer-aided drafting. Topics: Projection theory—multiview, axonometric, oblique. Auxiliaries, sections, isometrics, dimensions, fasteners, detail and assembly drawings. Introduction to blueprint reading. Overview of CIM and CAD integration with other CIM concepts. A design project incorporates developed skills in visualization, drawing techniques, standards and CAD.

    Weekly Lecture Hours: 1 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 3
  
  •  

    ME-UY 2211 Statics Laboratory

    1 Credits
    The course deals with measurement and calculations of bending stress, bending moment, shear forces and deflections in beams, buckling of struts and equilibrium analysis of structures.

    Corequisite(s): ME-UY 2213 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 0.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 1.5
  
  •  

    ME-UY 2213 Statics

    3 Credits
    The course covers three-dimensional vector treatment of the static equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies. Topics: Equivalent force and couple systems. Distributed force systems. Static analysis of trusses, frames and machines. Friction, impending motion. Methods of virtual work.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 1013  and MA-UY 1024 . Corequisite(s): ME-UY 2211 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 3211 Mechanics of Materials Laboratory

    1 Credits
    The course covers measurement of elastic constants for isotropic and anisotropic materials, verification of stress and strain transformation equations, stress concentration concept, unsymmetric bending of beams and torsion of shafts.

    Corequisite(s): ME-UY 3213 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 0.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 1.5
  
  •  

    ME-UY 3213 Mechanics of Materials

    3 Credits
    The course examines the Concept of Stresses and Strains in two and three dimensions, Stress-strain relationships, Stress transformation, Strain transformation, Axial members, Torsion of shafts, Bending of beams.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 2213 , ME-UY 2813  and MA-UY 2034 . Corequisite(s): ME-UY 3211 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 3223 Dynamics

    3 Credits
    The course explores three-dimensional treatment of the kinematics of particles and rigid bodies using various coordinate systems, Newton’s laws, work, energy, impulse, momentum, conservative force fields, impact and rotation and plane motion of rigid bodies.

    Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 2034  and ME-UY 2213 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 3233 Machine Design

    3 Credits
    This course introduces students to fundamentals of machine elements, enabling them to employ this knowledge to design machines for various practical applications. The course begins with a brief review of stress, deformation and failure, followed by friction and wear. Subsequently, loaded columns, pressurized cylinders and shafts are presented. Bearings, gears, screws, springs, brakes, clutches and belts are discussed. The course ends with an introduction to MEMS, Micro-Electro Mechanical Systems.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 3213 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 3311 Fluid Mechanics Laboratory

    1 Credits
    The course covers fluid mechanics instrumentation and principles, and consists of a set of laboratory experiments designed to reinforce concepts presented in ME-UY 3313 Fluid Mechanics . In addition, this course involves team work, report writing and oral presentations.

    Corequisite(s): ME-UY 3313 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 0.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 1.5
  
  •  

    ME-UY 3313 Fluid Mechanics

    3 Credits
    This course introduces fluid kinematics, hydrostatics and thermodynamics. Topics: Basic conservation laws in integral form for a control volume. Conservation of mass, momentum, angular momentum and energy for flow. Inviscid flow: Bernoulli’s and Euler’s equations. Viscous flow: flows in pipes and ducts, head loss and friction factor.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 3333 MA-UY 2034  and MA-UY 2114 . Corequisite(s): ME-UY 3311 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 3323 Energy Systems

    3 Credits
    This first course in power generation focuses on the analysis and design of energy-conversion systems. It will introduce students to fossil, nuclear and renewable-energy (including wind and solar) power plants with equal emphasis. Students gain a comprehensive and detailed understanding of the fundamentals of such systems and the issues related to their operation from economic, environmental and safety points of view.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 3333 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 3333 Thermodynamics

    3 Credits
    The course centers on properties of pure substances; concepts of work and heat; closed and open systems. Topics: Fundamental laws of thermodynamics. Carnot and Clasius statements of the 2nd law; entropy and entropy production; heat engines, refrigerators, heat pumps; efficiencies, coefficients of performance.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 2033 , MA-UY 1124  and MA-UY 2034 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 3411 Automatic Control Laboratory

    1 Credits
    The course covers system ID, modeling, identification and control of RC electrical network and a DC servo motor, modeling and control of a maglev system, rotary inverted pendulum and a coupled water tank system.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 3511 . Corequisite(s): ME-UY 3413 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 0.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 1.5
  
  •  

    ME-UY 3413 Automatic Control

    3 Credits
    The course examines dynamic system modeling, analysis and feedback control design with extensive, hands-on computer simulation. Topics: Modeling and analysis of dynamic systems. Description of interconnected systems via transfer functions and block/signal flow diagrams. System response characterization as transient and steady-state responses and error considerations. Stability of dynamical systems: Routh- Hurwitz criterion and Nyquist criterion. Graphical methods for dynamical system analysis and design: root locus and Bode plot. Computeraided feedback control design for mechanical, aerospace, robotic, thermo-fluid and vibratory systems.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 3513  and ME-UY 3223 . Corequisite(s): ME-UY 3411 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 3511 Measurement Systems Laboratory

    1 Credits
    The course covers electric measurements, data acquisition, passive and active filters for signal conditioning, temperature, position, velocity and acceleration measurements.

    Corequisite(s): ME-UY 3513 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 0.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 1.5
  
  •  

    ME-UY 3513 Measurement Systems

    3 Credits
    The course focuses on electrical circuits and components, filtering, dynamic measurement system response characteristics, analog signal processing, digital representation, data acquisition, sensors. Study of measurement systems via computer simulation.

    Prerequisite(s): MA-UY 2034  and PH-UY 2023  (for Brooklyn Engineering Students) OR MATH-AD 116, MATH-AD 121, and ENGR-AD 119 (for Abu Dhabi Students) Corequisite(s): ME-UY 3511 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 3713 Manufacturing Systems I

    3 Credits
    To be successful in the marketplace, a product must meet both customer needs and goals of performance, cost, quality, reliability, safety and the environment. The course addresses issues critical to the design of a product for manufacture and the methods that have been found to be successful in addressing these issues. The design process is studied and illustrated through class exercises and a term project. Selected manufacturing processes are studied. Economic feasibility, entrepreneur- ship and bringing products (and services) to the market are emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 1013  and MA-UY 1024 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 4112 Senior Design I

    2 Credits
    This is the first of two courses dedicated to the capstone design experience in mechanical engineering. In this first course, the students identify and define a project to design, build and test an engineering product or system and complete the preliminary design of their chosen system. The product-realization process, building effective teams and teamwork and communication skills are emphasized.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 2112 , ME-UY 3233  and ME-UY 3313 . Corequisite(s): ME-UY 4214 , ME-UY 4313  and ME-UY 3413 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 2 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 4113 Senior Design II

    3 Credits
    This is the second of two courses dedicated to the capstone design experience in mechanical engineering and based on knowledge and skills acquired in earlier course work. Topics: Product design, development, building and testing prototype hardware, with an emphasis on teamwork. The Product Realization Process emphasizes incorporation of engineering standards and realistic constraints. The course concentrates on communication skills.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 4112 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 4213 Design and Fabrication of Composite Materials

    3 Credits
    The course introduces composite materials. Topics: Introduction to types of reinforcements and matrix materials. Various applications in mechanical engineering. Manufacturing of polymer, metal and ceramic matrix materials. Analysis of laminated composites for mechanical properties.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 2813 , ME-UY 2811  and ME-UY 3213 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 4214 Finite Element Modeling, Design and Analysis

    4 Credits
    The analysis of complex static and dynamic problems involves three steps: selection of a mathematical model; analysis of the model; interpretation of the predicted response. The course deals with deriving analytical solutions and comparing them with Finite Element Analysis results. Students are required to use state-of-the-art commercial software.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 3213 MA-UY 2114  and MA-UY 2034 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 3 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 4311 Heat Transfer Laboratory

    1 Credits
    The course covers heat-transfer instrumentation and principles and consists of a set of laboratory experiments designed to reinforce the concepts presented in ME-UY 4313 Heat Transfer . In addition, this course involves team work, report writing and oral presentation.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 3311 . Corequisite(s): ME-UY 4313 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 0.5 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 1.5
  
  •  

    ME-UY 4313 Heat Transfer

    3 Credits
    The course introduces modes of conduction, convection and radiation heat transfer. Topics: Analysis of multidimensional geometries for the conduction mode. Unsteady conduction. Numerical methods of analysis. Introduction to convection. Internal and external convection. Natural convection and boiling and condensation. Principles of radiative heat transfer.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 3313 . Corequisite(s): ME-UY 4311 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 4353 Internal Combustion Engines

    3 Credits
    The course covers introduction and definitions, engine-operating characteristics. Topics: Thermodynamics of internal combustion engines. Thermodynamics of combustion. Combustion in spark ignition engines. Design for performance and efficiency. Pollutant formation and controls, emissions tests.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 3313  and ME-UY 3333 . Corequisite(s): ME-UY 4313 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 4363 Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning

    3 Credits
    This course reviews thermodynamic principles, psychometric chart and psychometric analysis, comfort air conditioning and indoor air quality, heating and cooling system, HVAC system design and equipment selection.

    Prerequisite(s): ME-UY 4313 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 4373 Introduction to Nuclear Engineering

    3 Credits
    This is intended to be a required course for the Nuclear Engineering Concentration. It covers three basic areas: (a) reactor kinetics, as it pertains to neutron reaction associated with fissile materials, (b) power reactor systems, i.e. the various types of nuclear reactors in use and their basic operating principles, and (c) design principles for reactors and reactor systems.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 3103 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
  
  •  

    ME-UY 4383 Introduction to Radiation Physics and Dosimetry

    3 Credits
    Theory and practice of Radiation and Health Physics. Atomic and nuclear structure, X-ray and gamma radiation, interaction of ionizing radiation with matter, and effects of ionizing radiation on living tissue. The course also introduces the principles of radiation detection, radiation measurement, and external and internal dosimetry.

    Prerequisite(s): PH-UY 3103 .
    Also listed under: PH-UY 3503 .
    Weekly Lecture Hours: 3 | Weekly Lab Hours: 0 | Weekly Recitation Hours: 0
 

Page: 1 <- Back 105 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15